Thursday , June 14 2018

Prison Life

Texas Could Shape Trump’s Proposals to Reform Federal Prisons

President Trump is pictured in front of the American flag during the 2018 State of the Union Address

Texas's reforms, including diversion programs for low-level drug offenders, increased attention to rehabilitation and work readiness, and other “second chance” measures, reduced recidivism and the incarceration rate. The federal Justice Department should take notice.

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Will Early Education Funding Reduce Future Crime?

the blue and red logo for Fight Crime Invest in Kids is pictured.

While policy changes and a move away from for-profit prison systems will go a long way in aligning America’s prisons with those of more progressive countries, education remains a key driver in preventing citizens from going to jail in the first place, in becoming more attractive prospects for hire, and in reducing recidivism.

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Healthy Cooking Program Feeds Female Prison Inmates Vital Skills

The simple act of learning what is good to put in your body and how to budget for the healthy food you need, along with how to prepare it, should be taught not only in every prison, but in every school and in every household in America. One Arkansas program for female inmates is lighting the way.

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Incarceration of Women on the Rise

The care of a family should not be a solo venture that falls on one woman's shoulders. In the best of circumstances, it should be shared among immediate and extended family and the greater community. If the burden were lightened and shared, the result might be that we'd see fewer women – and men – behind bars.

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America’s Mass Incarceration Problem by the Numbers

mass incarceration

For a democratic nation that's not even close to having the world’s highest population, there are a lot of people in jail. Non-violent drug offenders and people of color are disproportionally over-represented, and women are committing more crimes than ever before. Yet, thanks to the hard work of policymakers and organizations and individuals pressing for change, the dramatic decline in incarcerated youth is encouraging.

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