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“Censored news” and real news

Every year Project Censored puts out a list of what it considers the most censored important news stories of the year.

And apparently I’m not alone in wondering just how a story can be censored when the size of the media changes literally each time someone else starts a blog. The San Francisco Bay Guardian News has a good piece on this topic and the latest list.

One story which I don’t think we’ll see much coverage of – but we should – is this one, which may make me rethink whether I want to keep my Yahoo account:

Yahoo business ethics sorely lacking: The latest news that Yahoo turned over private emails to the Chinese government which led to the conviction and ten-year sentence of Shi Tao, an editorial department head at the Contemporary Business News in China’s Hunan province turns my stomach.

Does the fact that [Yahoo] operates under Chinese law free it from all ethical considerations?” asked a press advocacy group called Reporters without Borders.

Tao’s crime was sending an email to a New York-based Web site regarding the Chinese government warning to its governmental representatives to watch for dissident activity during the 15th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre.

If Yahoo, and there are plenty of other companies as well, are not expected to have a conscience when it comes to doing business with whomever, then should we believe that they have a conscience when it comes to dealing with us, right here in the U.S.?

The situation reminds me of the outcry a few months back when it became clear that Microsoft had assisted China with some of its dirty work.

I hope that same outcry now comes with this news about Yahoo.

About Scott Butki

Scott Butki was a newspaper reporter for more than 10 years before making a career change into education... then into special education. He has been doing special education work for about five years He lives in Austin. He reads at least 50 books a year and has about 15 author interviews each year and, yes, unlike tv hosts he actually reads each one. He is an in-house media critic, a recovering Tetris addict and a proud uncle. He has written articles on practically all topics from zoos to apples and almost everything in between.

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