Sunday , December 10 2017
Home / Jon Sobel (page 10)

Jon Sobel

Jon Sobel is a Publisher and Executive Editor of Blogcritics as well as lead editor of the Culture & Society section. As a writer he contributes most often to Culture, where he reviews NYC theater; he also covers interesting music releases.

Through Oren Hope Marketing and Copywriting at http://www.orenhope.com/ you can hire him to write or edit whatever marketing or journalistic materials your heart desires.

Jon also writes the blog Park Odyssey at http://parkodyssey.blogspot.com/ where he visits every park in New York City. And by night he’s a part-time working musician: lead singer, songwriter, and bass player for Whisperado, a member of other bands as well, and a sideman.

Theater Review (NYC): Sholem Asch’s ‘God of Vengeance’ from New Yiddish Rep

Just around the corner from where it first played, Sholem Asch's 'God of Vengeance,' challenging and controversial in so many ways since its debut in 1907, has opened at La Mama in its original Yiddish (with English supertitles). Upon its Broadway run in English in 1923, the play's cast and producers were arrested on obscenity charges. With its frank depiction of lesbianism and prostitution, it's no wonder.

Read More »

Music Review: Dropkick Murphys – ’11 Short Stories of Pain & Glory’

Every song is about something. Maybe not always real people or events, but stuffed to capacity with visceral language and imagery on top of Dropkick Murphys' trademark skull-rattling volume and unison shouts.

Read More »

Music Review: Jethro Tull – ‘Stand Up: The Elevated Edition’

Much of Jethro Tull's second album still stands up, so to speak. The bright nasality of the hyperactive mandolin on "Fat Man," the blues-rock/progressive fusion of "Nothing is Easy," and the dark psychedelia of "We Used to Know" are all of their time, yet in the new mixes they leap urgently from the speakers. A 1969 Stockholm concert and a booklet packed with reminiscences and commentary help make this new edition something Tull fans will value.

Read More »

Music Reviews: Holly Norman’s Bluegrass Tribute to Elvis Presley and Whitney Rose’s ‘South Texas Suite’

Don't let the cheesy cover art steer you away from this music, which is anything but. It's hard to go wrong with material this good, and Holly Norman and her fantastic backup musicians do right by it – and by Elvis – in a big way.

Read More »

Music Review: Laura Dubin Trio – ‘Live at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival’

On a fizzy mix of traditional jazz (mostly originals) and standards (Gershwin, Cole Porter, Fats Waller), bebop, and classical and romantic piano music by the likes of Mozart, Chopin, and Ravel, the pianist and her trio take enormous joy in finding surprising connections.

Read More »

Theater Review (NYC): ‘No Man’s Land’ by Melissa Moschitto and The Anthropologists

Inspired by the bizarre true story of a Virginia farmer who claimed a patch of land in Africa in order to make his daughter a real princess, the show is a frustrating jumble, with highly entertaining and materially noteworthy elements undercut by sequences that go down the drain.

Read More »

Music Review: Pianist Tania Stavreva – ‘Rhythmic Movement’

On top of a capacious talent, the Bulgarian-born, New York-based pianist has a distinctive sensibility evidenced by her choice of repertoire, which encompasses works by composers from her homeland as well as contemporary new music and her own compositions.

Read More »