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Our future is anything but rosy. But that's the irony of history.

The Irony of History: The NWO Revisited

Only a month ago, I wrote a two-part piece on the New World Order – an intellectual exercise, or so I thought, a thought-experiment, a what-would-happen kind of thing if and only if. The events since, not to mention the hidden implications of fellow Blogcritic Ms. Reidhead’s article, have convinced me beyond a doubt that what I was entertaining then as a remote possibility was quickly assuming the dimensions of an impending reality.

“Welcome to Star Trek: The Next Generation; it’s sooner than you think,” was the line I used. A catchy phrase, I was congratulating myself. Well, I no longer think it’s either catchy or funny, or any of the above. Which just goes to show the difference a month can make.

Since the Eighties, the hidden theme of American politics has been the growth of corporate power. The political responses were many and varied. Some looked the other way, taking the path of least resistance. Others, of more questionable moral ilk, viewed this development as an opportunity to enrich themselves through shady deal-making and exchange of quid pro quos —  the practice of lobbying, an integral part of American political landscape, providing the excuse. Others yet, the most sensible of the bunch, waited on the sidelines anticipating a showdown.

And a showdown it was going to be, since you can’t serve two masters at once; for as the global conglomerate was gaining in power, enabled  by crooked politicians and public officials, the power of the government to control the abuses and set the tone for the nation was quickly on the wane. The culture of corruption permeating all levels of business and government and the resulting collusion between public and private interest couldn’t continue indefinitely. Sooner or later, a sense of decency and moral outrage were bound to prevail. The corporation and business interests had to be made subservient if the government — the idea of polity — was to recoup its rightful authority in all matters affecting national interests. It was only a matter of time, I was certain, and I looked forward to this showdown with great hope and expectations.

Well, it never came to that. The corporations overreached, rendering the whole scenario null and void. A perfect opportunity, you might say, for the government to take over the reins and re-establish itself as the rightful master. Which is why I viewed the present crisis as a godsend: it produced the requisite kind of result by bringing the business world to its knees without bloodshed or ugly confrontation. Now I have second thoughts.

Drastic times call for drastic measures, so we're told. And in that spirit, we’ve seen the new administration set itself about the business of correcting the abuses and bringing order out of chaos. We’ve seen bailouts and bankruptcies, the capping of the executive pay, the firing of GM's CEO, the fury over AIG bonuses, the quiet takeover of major U.S. banks, the stimulus package and the pork. In short, all the right moves with full support of the public. And yet…

What we’re seeing, in effect, is the culmination of the Imperial Presidency concept, articulated by Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. in the Sixties. Heck, we’re seeing the beginnings of Imperial Government. And the scary thing is — there is no viable opposition as the public is all behind it. But that’s what you get when the opportunity knocks on the door. Since the corporate world has folded, the government took over. And given the absence of any foreseeable opposition — since the public sentiment is behind it — there’s no stopping it.

Either way, it doesn’t spell a rosy future. One way or another, we shall see the erosion of our freedoms and cherished way of life. And I don’t care whether it’s the U.S. or some other government in The Hague or Timbuktu that will be at the helm. Same difference to me. Sooner or later, mark my words, we’ll all be under the thumb.

It’s almost uncanny how our language foretells the future:

“Global problems demand global solutions.”

“What affects one, affects all.”

“We’re all in this together.”

Why, only a week ago, in the aftermath of the G20 meeting, Gordon Brown spoke openly of the NWO without any apology, as though it was the most natural order of things and, in a manner of speaking, preordained (see the video).

Uniform currency, uniform (international) law, uniform way of life — that’s what the future holds.

Enjoy while you can!

About Roger Nowosielski

I'm a free lance writer. Areas of expertise: philosophy, sociology, liberal arts, and literature. An academic at a fringe, you might say, and I like it that way.

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