Thursday , June 14 2018
Home / Culture and Society / Arts / Movie Review: ‘Goodbye to All That,’ Starring Paul Schneider, Melanie Lynskey
Playwright and screenwriter of 'Junebug,' the award winning Angus MacLachlan, has done it again with 'Goodbye to All That'

Movie Review: ‘Goodbye to All That,’ Starring Paul Schneider, Melanie Lynskey

(L to R) Melanie Lynskey, Paul Schneider and Ceilia Weston in 'Goodbye to All That.' Photo from the film.
(L to R) Melanie Lynskey, Paul Schneider and Ceilia Weston in ‘Goodbye to All That.’ Photo from the film.

Playwright and screenwriter of Junebug, the award winning Angus MacLachlan, has done it again! He has penned a funny, poignant, commonsensical and incredibly human film which will resonate with a wide swath of individuals if it is discoverable to them. And Goodbye to All That, also directed by MacLachlan should be imminently discoverable. After all, the age group that this clever, savvy movie should appeal to ranges from thirty-somethings to sixty-somethings, and includes men and women. If you enjoy Indie films that cut through the hype, shmoozy glitter, and intentional, self-conscious realism, Goodbye to All That is for you, especially if you like to laugh.

Though the film has a regional feel, its subject touches upon issues that city-folks can relate to, namely separation, divorce and reentering the hot dating scene using Social Media after years of a settled, somnambulant marriage. MacLachlan is a canny director. He knows how best to achieve humor with his comedic timing and knowledge of how to vary silence, a look and a glance, with pacing and rhythm. The result has brought about an award winning performance by the likeable, human and very funny Paul Schneider, who plays the everyman protagonist, Otto Wall. Schneider who won a Best Actor in a Narrative Feature award at Tribeca Film Festival is incomparably Otto.

Paul Schneider in 'Goodbye to All That,' directed by Angus MacLachlan. Photo from the film.
Paul Schneider in ‘Goodbye to All That,’ directed by Angus MacLachlan. Photo from the film.

With clear precision, from the outset, MacLachlan intimates that Otto’s and Annie’s (a fine performance by Melanie Lynskey), relationship is terminally ill. The humor is that Otto is the only one who is back at the alter thinking everything is going really well. The arc of the film is Otto’s dawning realization that he has to grow up and confront who he is and what he wants in a relationship with a woman and especially in his relationship with his daughter after he separates from his wife. As he juggles his priorities, he begins to understand where he has come from. But will he be able to resume an existence without the woman who was so comfortable in his life’s landscape that he forgot she was there?

This is a tall order for Otto, as it might be for many men who have grown into a dullard’s reality of walking through time with someone they don’t know, understand or are interested in, even if it is their wife. However, Otto is fortunate to receive help. It comes in the form of a number of beautiful, autonomous, independent-minded and intelligent women. It’s an interesting arrangement; he is interested in them sexually and they are interested in him sexually. This is the age of Social Media and women are approachable at the click of a button on Facebook and the same applies for men as both genders surf online dating sites and Facebook to see if there might be compatibility.

Paul Schneider and Ashley Hewitt in 'Goodbye to All That.' Photo from the film.
Paul Schneider and Audrey P. Scott in ‘Goodbye to All That.’ Photo from the film.

For Otto this is a kind of Mecca. What was once a deadening existence just moving through the continuum of space, now becomes a life that is thrilling and alive. After the first “date” he is invigorated and “rarein’ to go.” The painful jolt of being dumped (no spoiler alert…I will not ruin it for you as to the specifics),  has revived him from near brain death. And that electric current spurs him on to recognize that culturally “things have changed” after being out of the social loop for 15 married years. It’s a change for the better.

Otto works through gauging his priorities and begins to develop into a responsible, caring male. Some of this evolves because of the unique responses and reciprocation of feelings from the women he engages with- Mildred (Ashley Hinshaw), Stephanie (Heather Graham), and Debbie Spangler (Anna Camp). Their meet-ups and dates are hilarious, surprising and real. Otto also is guided by his daughter (11-year-old Edie), whom he attempts to please and who is not afraid to “get real” and censure him when/if he goes too far with his women friends.

Massaged by all of this female wisdom and the added preciousness of reestablishing a connection with an old girlfriend (Heather Lawless), he knew and cared for in high school (the classmates find each other via Facebook and hold a reunion), Otto finally gets to make a conscious decision about what he wants and who he is. He has landed on solid ground. He recognizes that he enjoys his life, for he is no longer sailing away on the wings of oblivion in an existence that will be over before it really begins.

Goodbye to All That, an apt title, is meaningful without appearing to be “profound.” Yet it is real, touching, powerful and extremely funny. How MacLachlan achieves all this in a concentrated work whose scenes are precisely edited so they are just enough, and the dialogue sufficient without any extraneous bits to reveal the characters’ wants and needs is an extraordinary achievement for a first time director. It would be a shame if the film didn’t get the recognition it deserves for the writing and directing and the women’s acting ensemble in support of Schneider’s performance. All sync seamlessly to make an enjoyable and smart film.

You can see Goodbye to All That at the IFC Center in NYC, starting December 17, Wednesday, and will be there for one week. It is also opening in Winston-Salem, NC, Santa Fe, NM, Monterey, CA, and Pittsburg, PA. After that it will be available on iTunes and VOD.

[amazon template=iframe image&asin=B00R497Y8Q,B000BYRCQU]

About Carole Di Tosti

Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D. is a published writer, novelist and poet. She authors three blogs: The Fat and the Skinny, All Along the NYC Skyline, A Christian Apologists' Sonnets. She contributed articles for Technorati on various trending topics. She guest writes for other blogs. She covers NYC trending events and writes articles promoting advocacy. She was a former English Instructor. Her published dissertation is referenced in three books, two by Margo Ely.

Check Also

Blu-ray Review: ‘Togetherness: The Complete First Season’

'Togetherness' is a quirky indie dramedy delightfully stretched out into a series with a wonderful cast.