Sunday , September 27 2020

Future of Music Policy Summit 2004

Hard to believe it’s already been a year since the last Future of Music Coalition Policy Summit, but it has. The cost is quite reasonable, the topics crucial, and the star power impressive:

    Now in its fourth year, the FMC Policy Summit is a forum for musicians, lawyers, academics, policymakers and music industry executives to come together to discuss and debate some of the most contentious issues surrounding digital technology, artists’ rights and the current state of the music industry.

    New for Summit 04!
    LOWER REGISTRATION PRICES
    $149 for two-day pass
    $99 for one-day pass

    DISCOUNTED RATE FOR STUDENTS
    $99 for two-day pass
    $66 for one-day pass

    CONVENIENT LOCATION
    GWU’s Lisner Auditorium is centrally located in the heart of DC, easily accesible by foot, taxi, car or Metro

    It is our continuing goal to bring the best and brightest people working in music and technology to discuss the most critical issues impacting our community. The Summit’s events direct the agenda towards guarding the value of music for musicians, and guarding access to music for music consumers. In addition, we look to the future and discuss the various models the music industry might adopt in coming years.

    It is our belief that by continuing to organize events such as this one we will help the media, citizens, creators and our elected officials and policy makers have a more sophisticated understanding of the opportunities and effects of these new technologies on the guarding the value of music for musicians, and guarding access to music for citizens.

    Saturday, May 1
    7:00 PM

    Join us for what’s becoming a tradition: a massive and raucous Pho Dinner over at Nam Viet in Arlington, VA. Details soon.

    Sunday, May 2
    7:30 – 9:00 AM

    Check-in/breakfast

    9:00 AM

    Welcome

    9:15 AM – 10:30 AM

    Panel 1: Numbers, Numbers, Numbers
    Good data is essential for both proper business planning and the creation of sensible policies. But who has the data? Who owns the data? How do musicians and citizens access data, and how does data influence business decisions and policy debates? This panel brings together representatives from collection agencies, academics and researchers who rely on data to compensate artists, or to illustrate the effects of current technologies, policies and business models on musicians and citizens. The impact of file sharing on the music
    industry, as well as musicians, will be discussed.

    Jim Griffin CEO, Cherry Lane Digital/Pho (moderator)
    Ron Gertz President and CEO, Music Reports
    Mary Madden Research Specialist, Pew Internet & American Life Project
    John Simson Executive Director, SoundExchange
    Koleman Strumpf Associate Professor, Department of Economics, UNC Chapel Hill

    10:45 AM – 12:00 PM

    Panel 2: The Business School of Rock
    Most artists would rather be plucking strings than plugging numbers into a Quicken file, but as the music landscape changes it’s more important than ever that performers take control of their own business affairs. This panel brings together managers, musicians, and label owners to talk about the benefits and drawbacks of treating your band, or your artistic self, as a business entity — from managing your catalog and keeping track of revenue, to getting your own health insurance policy.

    Kristin Thomson Organizer, FMC (moderator)
    Kim Coletta Desoto Records and band Jawbox
    Dave Frey Silent Partner Management
    Pat Irwin member of B-52’s, film/TV music composer
    Alex Maiolo Co-owner, Lee Moore Insurance
    Brian Austin Whitney Founder, Just Plain Folks
    Shoshana Samole Zisk Attorney and Business Affairs, George Clinton Enterprises

    12:00 – 12:30 PM

    Special Interview
    Will Poole Microsoft’s Windows Business Client

    12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

    Lunch
    We have no formal lunch plans this year because of space considerations, but there are plenty of options within walking distance of Lisner.

    Brown Bag It! 12:45 – 1:30 PM
    We’re organizing a couple of intimate brown bag sessions that will happen across the street from Lisner at GWU’s Marvin Center. Likely topics on Sunday:

    SoundExchange: what is it, how does it work, and why should musicians join?

    Broadcast and Indecency: an update about Congress and the FCC’s recent crackdown on broadcast “indecency.” What legislation is being proposed, and what could be the effect on musicians and performers?

    The sessions will be 45 minutes long and run concurrently in 40-capacity meeting rooms over at Marvin Center. First come, first serve seating.

    1:45 PM – 3:00 PM

    Panel 3: This Panel Kills Fascists
    Woody Guthrie was so convinced about the power of music to bring political change that he wrote “This Machine Kills Fascists” on his guitar. During the November 2003 Tell Us the Truth Tour, eight musicians took to the road to play music and educate audiences about media consolidation and American trade policy. In so doing they extended the rich history of music and politics, yet the first question they were asked by journalists was “why be political?” From the gospel fuel of the civil rights movement to the rock and roll psychedelia of the 60s anti-war movement, from the anti-commercialism of punk to the anti-racism and class consciousness of Rap and hip-hop … FMC knows music and politics go together like peanut butter and chocolate. This panel will remind us why.

    Jenny Toomey Executive Director, FMC (moderator)
    Danny Goldberg Chairman and CEO, Artemis Records
    Alexis McGill Political Director, Hip Hop Summit Action Network
    Dave Meinert PNW Chapter of Recording Academy, Owner/President of Blue Team Management
    Michael Muniz Director of Latin Organizing, AFM
    Jay Rosenthal Attorney, Recording Artists’ Coalition, Berliner Corcoran & Rowe, LLP
    Pat Thetic Anti-Flag/Punkvoter.com

    3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

    Special Interview
    Rob Glaser CEO, Real Networks
    will be interviewed by
    Walter Mossberg Wall Street Journal

    3:30 PM – 4:45 PM

    Panel 4: The Celestial Jukebox: Fact, Fiction, Future?
    2003 was another exciting year for legal digital downloads, with the launch of the iTunes Store (and its many imitators), Real’s purchase of Rhapsody, the rebirth of Napster and rampant rumors about the debut of Microsoft’s competing music store. 2003 also saw a revitalized critique of these emerging technologies, with some continuing to say that these legal stores will never be able to compete with the plethora of free music available on P2P networks, either on price or on sheer depth of catalog. This panel takes a look at the ups and down of music’s holy grail: the digital marketplace.

    Brian Zisk Technologies Director, FMC (moderator)
    Kevin Arnold Founder, IODA (Independent Online Distribution Alliance)
    John Flansburgh They Might be Giants
    Tim Quirk Executive Editor, Music, Real Networks and band Too Much Joy
    Derek Sivers CD Baby
    Holmes Wilson Downhill Battle

    4:45 PM – 6:00 PM

    Panel 5: Get In the Game (the Legislative Game, that is)
    We all recognize that the only way that artists are guaranteed to lose in the policy arena is if they fail to fully engage in the process. But what does that mean? What issues should artists and the music community be most concerned about in this critical year? And, most importantly, how can artists and music fans maximize their effectiveness in Washington, DC? A panel of advocates, policymakers and artists will explore both the policy challenges facing the music community and strategies for truly making a difference.

    Michael Bracy Government Relations, FMC (moderator)
    Ann Chaitovitz National Director of Sound Recordings, AFTRA
    Daryl Friedman Senior Executive Director, Washington DC Operations, Recording Academy
    Marcus Johnson Jazz Musician and CEO, Three Keys Music
    Vidya Krishnamurthy Legislative Coordinator, Free Press
    Hal Ponder Director of Governent Relations, AFM

    6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

    Cocktail Party hosted by ASCAP
    Grand Ballroom on the 3rd floor of the Marvin Center

    Monday, May 3

    7:30 AM – 9:00 AM

    Check-in/Breakfast

    9:00 AM – 9:15 AM

    Welcome

    9:15 AM – 9:45 AM
    Keynote Speech
    FCC Commissioner Michael Copps

    9:45 AM – 11:00 AM

    Panel 6: State of the Union
    At every Future of Music Policy Summit, we ask a panel of experts to address the fundamental question: What is the State of the Union? From peer-to-peer file sharing and the related lawsuits, to the emergence of legal download channels, to the media reform movement and the continued mobilization of musician’s rights organizations, artists, policymakers and industry are working overtime to adjust to a fluid marketplace. What accomplishments should be celebrated? Where is there work yet to be done? For the fourth year running FMC asks: what does 2004 hold in store for musicians, consumers, and the music community?

    John Nichols Writer, The Nation (moderator)
    Mike Dreese CEO and Co-Founder, Newbury Comics
    Peter Jenner Sincere Management and Chairman, AURA and Chairman, IMMF
    Gary Shapiro President and CEO, Consumer Electronics Association
    Cary Sherman President, Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)
    Tina Weymouth & Chris Frantz Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club

    11:15AM – 12:30 PM

    Panel 7: Alternative Compensation Systems
    Peer-to-peer file sharing is, technically-speaking, a simple and inexpensive way to distribute and share music. But since peer-to-peer emerged, many in the music/technology space have pondered this thought: Is there a way to transform this mechanism of open sharing into a mechanism of the open market? This panel looks at a number of developing proposals about how revenue could be generated, collected, and distributed to artists and rights holders from sharing on P2P networks.

    Joseph Gratz Law Student, University of Minnesota (moderator)
    Chris Amenita Senior Vice President, ASCAP Enterprises Group
    William Terry Fisher Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
    Jessica Litman Professor of Law, Wayne State University
    Neil Netanel Professor of Law, UCLA and University of Texas
    Sandy Pearlman Vice President, Media Development, Multicast Technologies

    12:30 PM – 1:45 PM

    Lunch
    We have no formal lunch plans this year because of space considerations, but there are plenty of options within walking distance of Lisner.

    Brown Bag It! 12:45 – 1:30 PM
    We’re organizing a couple of intimate, brown bag sessions that will happen across the street from Lisner at GWU’s Marvin Center. Monday’s likely topics to include:

    Low Power Radio/Webcasting update
    Copyrights and Copywrongs: what does the tension between copyright extension and the creative commons mean for musicians and creators?

    The sessions will be 45 minutes long and run concurrently in meeting rooms over at Marvin Center. First come, first serve seating.

    2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

    Panel 8: Synergies or Antitrust: How does consolidation help or hurt artist and citizens?
    The music industry is indicative of a broad societal paradox: even as new technologies decrease the cost of production and distribution of music, more and more of the music and entertainment business is owned by fewer players. On one hand, independent content flourishes in ways never before possible. On the other hand, millions of citizens have protested the current ownership structures where a handful of vertically integrated corporations already sell tickets, promote concerts, program radio, own newspapers, television stations, record labels and movie studios, and invest heavily in emerging technologies like satellite radio and the web. Has the increasing scale of these corporations allowed for the flowering of independent content? Or are we tilting dangerously toward a world where corporate control could stifle creativity, culture and political discourse?

    Thomas Frank Author and Editor, The Baffler (moderator)
    Wayne Crews Director of Technology Studies, Cato Institute
    Neil Glazer Attorney, Madison House/SCI Ticketing
    Thomas Hazlett Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
    Seth Hurwitz IMP/9:30 Club
    Chellie Pingree President and CEO, Common Cause
    Jim Winston Executive Director, National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters

    3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

    Keynote Speech
    Senator Norm Coleman (R-MN)

    3:45 PM – 4:45 PM

    Panel 9: Into the Grey
    During the “Illegal Imagination” panel at the 2003 Policy Summit, artists and copyright experts discussed the ways that extensions of copyright law and the prohibitive licensing fees might limit creativity. In February 2004, DJ Danger Mouse took Jay-Z’s Black Album and mixed it with The Beatles’ White Album to create … The Grey Album. The album, which the DJ created and released without seeking consent from the copyright owners, was barely made available before DJ Danger Mouse received cease and desist letters from the Beatles’ label, EMI. Clearly these laws are not limiting creativity, nor are they impeding circulation, but they are making it impossible to circulate this type of creativity legally. What is lost and gained in the mash-up phenomenon? Shouldn’t artists have the right to control the tracks they’ve created? Is there a way to harness the current smash-up enthusiasm to serve artists and culture?

    Walter McDonough General Counsel, FMC (moderator)
    David Carson General Counsel, US Copyright Office
    Barton Herbison Executive Director, Nashville Songwriters Association International
    Siva Vaidhyanathan Assistant Professor, Department of Culture and Communication, New York University
    Suzanne Vega ASCAP songwriter, performer

    5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

    Panel 10: Gazing Into the Crystal Ball
    At the end of our two days, we turn away from the question of what should happen to the question of what will happen. From the FCC’s efforts to address localism in media and expand Low Power Radio, to the widely accepted notion that a new Telecommunications Act is on the horizon, our panel of policy experts will share their perspectives on where these policy trends are heading and the impact that these decisions will have on the music community.

    Lee Carosi Majority Counsel, Senate Commerce Committee
    Representative Jim Cooper (D-TN)
    Adam Eisgrau Executive Director, P2P United
    Cheryl Leanza Deputy Director, Media Access Project
    Chris Murray Internet and Telecommunications Counsel, Consumers Union
    Gigi Sohn President, Public Knowledge

    6:00 – 8:00 PM

    Cocktail Party hosted by Microsoft
    Grand Ballroom on the 3rd floor of the Marvin Center

    Keynote Speakers

    Senator Norm Coleman (R-MN)
    FCC Commissioner Michael Copps
    Real Networks CEO Rob Glaser
    Will Poole Senior VP, Microsoft’s Windows Client Business

    Panelists

    Chris Amenita Senior Vice President, ASCAP Enterprises Group
    Kevin Arnold Founder, IODA (Independent Online Distribution Alliance)
    Michael Bracy Government Relations, Future of Music Coalition
    Lee Carosi Majority Counsel, Senate Commerce Committee
    David Carson General Counsel, US Copyright Office
    Ann Chaitovitz National Director of Sound Recordings, AFTRA
    Kim Coletta Desoto Records and band Jawbox
    Representative Jim Cooper (D-TN)
    Wayne Crews Director of Technology Studies, Cato Institute
    Mike Dreese CEO and Co-Founder, Newbury Comics
    Adam Eisgrau Executive Director, P2P United
    William Terry Fisher Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
    John Flansburgh Musician, They Might be Giants
    Thomas Frank Author and Editor, The Baffler
    Chris Frantz Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club
    Dave Frey Silent Partner Management
    Daryl Friedman Senior Executive Director, Washington DC Operations, The Recording Academy
    Ron Gertz President and CEO, Music Reports
    Neil Glazer Attorney, Madison House/SCI Ticketing
    Danny Goldberg Chairman and CEO, Artemis Records
    Joseph Gratz Law Student, University of Minnesota
    Jim Griffin CEO, Cherry Lane Digital/Pho
    Thomas Hazlett Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research
    Barton Herbison Executive Director, Nashville Songwriters Association International
    Seth Hurwitz IMP/9:30 Club
    Pat Irwin member of B-52’s, film/TV music composer
    Peter Jenner Sincere Management and Chairman, AURA and Chairman, IMMF
    Marcus Johnson Jazz Musician and CEO, Three Keys Music
    Vidya Krishnamurthy Legislative Coordinator, Free Press
    Cheryl Leanza Deputy Director, Media Access Project
    Jessica Litman Professor of Law, Wayne State University
    Mary Madden Research Specialist, Pew Internet & American Life Project
    Alex Maiolo Co-owner, Lee Moore Insurance
    Walter McDonough General Counsel, Future of Music Coalition
    Alexis McGill Political Director, Hip Hop Summit Action Network
    Dave Meinert PNW Chapter of Recording Academy, Owner/President of Blue Team Management
    Walter Mossberg Wall Street Journal
    Michael Muniz Director of Latin Organizing, AFM
    Chris Murray Internet and Telecommunications Counsel, Consumers Union
    Neil Netanel Professor of Law, UCLA and University of Texas
    John Nichols Writer, The Nation
    Sandy Pearlman Vice President, Media Development, Multicast Technologies
    Chellie Pingree President and CEO, Common Cause
    Hal Ponder Director of Governent Relations, American Federation of Musicians (AFM)
    Tim Quirk Executive Editor, Music, Real Networks and band Too Much Joy
    Jay Rosenthal Attorney, Recording Artists’ Coalition, Berliner Corcoran & Rowe, LLP
    Gary Shapiro President and CEO, Consumer Electronics Association
    Cary Sherman President, Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA)
    John Simson Executive Director, SoundExchange
    Derek Sivers CD Baby
    Gigi Sohn President, Public Knowledge
    Koleman Strumpf Associate Professor, Department of Economics, UNC Chapel Hill
    Pat Thetic Anti-Flag/Punkvoter.com
    Jenny Toomey Executive Director, Future of Music Coalition
    Siva Vaidhyanathan Assistant Professor, Department of Culture and Communication, New York University
    Suzanne Vega ASCAP songwriter and performer
    Tina Weymouth Talking Heads/Tom Tom Club
    Brian Austin Whitney Founder, Just Plain Folks
    Holmes Wilson Downhill Battle
    Jim Winston Executive Director, National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters
    Shoshana Samole Zisk Attorney and Business Affairs, George Clinton Enterprises
    Brian Zisk Technologies Director, Future of Music Coalition

More info and signup here.

About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: [email protected], Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.

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