Sunday , September 20 2020
Don't let this set escape you.

DVD Review: The Fugitive – Season One, Volume Two

The Fugitive follows the adventures of Dr. Richard Kimble, a man on the run after being convicted of murdering his wife. At the start of each episode in this set, the narrator informs the viewer that Kimble is innocent and was unable to prove “that moments before discovering his murdered wife’s body he saw a one-armed man running from the vicinity of his home.” On his way to Death Row, fate offered Kimble a reprieve in the form of a train accident, allowing him to escape his police escort, Lieutenant Philip Gerard.

Over the course of the series, Kimble travels the country searching for the one-armed man, following any lead no matter how slim, all the while trying to stay out of the clutches of the police, especially the determined Gerard. Kimble moves from town to town, taking odd jobs and false names, but since the case made national headlines, he runs into people who know or discover his identity. What keeps the viewer intrigued is never knowing how the characters are going to react to Kimble: do they believe he is a murderer and inform the authorities, do they believe he is innocent and try to help him, or do they believe they can take advantage of Kimble’s predicament for their own nefarious purposes?

The Fugitive is an all-time classic television drama and in 1993 was ranked by TV Guide as the best dramatic series of the 1960s. Produced by the legendary Quinn Martin, it ran four seasons from 1963 to 1967. The finale became the highest-rated dramatic program up to that time, bringing in 30 million viewers, which was then 72 percent of all households. It was unseated in 1980 by the revelation of who shot J.R. on Dallas.

The series has a number of assets, but its greatest is its writing. Kimble is compelling as a lead character because the audience roots for him to succeed. He’s an everyman wrongly accused, a successful plot device that Alfred Hitchcock used to great effect in a few films. The specter of Gerard and the law raises the stakes and creates tension. Kimble being a fugitive created infinite story possibilities for the writers because he could appear anywhere and alongside anyone, the only limitation being Kimble would have to move on by the episode’s end. “Come Watch Me Die” provides an interesting twist as Kimble is sworn in as a deputy and escorts a prisoner. The man-on-the-run formula became a successful template that many television shows have used over the years, both popular (The Incredible Hulk and The A-Team) and obscure (Run, Joe, Run and Two).

The cast is talented. David Janssen played Kimble and was nominated for an Emmy for his work this season. The only other actor to “appear” in every episode was series narrator William Conrad, a television icon for both his acting and voiceover work. Barry Morse played Lt. Phillip Gerard, an allusion to Inspector Javert from Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables. Like many old series, it is fun for TV buffs to see what actors appear. The most well known include Claude Akins, Lee Grant, Carroll O’Connor, Warren Oates, Telly Savalas, Bruce Dern, and Diane Ladd.  Lakers broadcaster Chick Hearn shows up in a small role as a television reporter.

This four-DVD set presents the final 15 episodes of season one in airdate order. The shows have been transferred from the original negative with restored audio and according to the liner notes “some episodes may be edited from their original network versions.”  The video looks crisp and clean, accentuating the beauty of the black-and-white footage.  The Fugitive is a quality series that deserves to be in the video library of any serious TV-on-DVD collector.

About Gordon S. Miller

Gordon S. Miller is the artist formerly known as El Bicho, the nom de plume he used when he first began reviewing movies online for The Masked Movie Snobs in 2003. Before the year was out, he became that site's publisher. Over the years, he has also contributed to a number of other sites as a writer and editor, such as FilmRadar, Film School Rejects, High Def Digest, and Blogcritics. He is the Publisher of Cinema Sentries. Some of his random thoughts can be found at twitter.com/ElBicho_CS

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