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This is poetry from a complex and gifted mind and also from the streets. It is not pretty but it is impressive and worthwhile for the reader.

Book Review: ‘Are There Zombies in Heaven?’ by Eric “The Moebius Kid” Morlin

For many years Eric “The Moebius Kid” Morlin was a fixture on the streets of Little Five Points in Atlanta. Little Five Points was for a long time a mecca for creative free spirits and homeless kids (and there still are a lot of those kids around the neighborhood). Morlin was one of those street kids. He supported himself by reciting poetry and selling books on the street. This poetry springs from that period.  It is raw and honest and often uncomfortable and painful. But out of that pain and honesty comes something extraordinary.

zombies

This poetry if full of violence, love. despair, and tentative hope. It is littered with mythological figures and the search for the core of identity. Many of the poems deal with a complicated and rocky relationship.

Through it all Morlin lets you into his wildly intelligent mind and further into his experiences than you might feel you should go, but hey, you were invited when he put these words on paper. So prepare yourself and dip in. You will find something extraordinary and yes, ultimately often beautiful.

Morlin ultimately left the streets for college and gained a degree in history. These days he goes by Moebius Machiavelli on Facebook. For full disclosure, as a native of metro Atlanta I was familiar with him to a certain extent before I read his book, and we have mutual friends. although I do not know him personally outside of social media. He did send me this book to review but my review would be exactly the same if I had acquired the book in any other fashion.

About Rhetta Akamatsu

I am an author of non-fiction books and an online journalist. My books include Haunted Marietta, The Irish Slaves, T'ain't Nobody's Business If I Do: Blues Women Past and Present, Southern Crossroads: Georgia Bluesand Sex Sells: Women in Photography and Film.

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