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Tim Gebhart

After 30 years of practicing law to provide shelter for his family, books and dogs. Tim Gebhart is now perfecting the art of doing little more than reading, writing and sleeping.

Umberto Eco Revisits His Adolescence

Umberto Eco is one of those authors who frustrates me. I truly enjoyed The Name of the Rose. I liked Foucault’s Pendulum as much, if not more. On the other hand, I gave up on Baudolino after about 100 pages. I did not give up on Eco’s new work, The …

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Science, Faith and The God Particle

Advanced particle physics may not seem the vehicle for popular fiction to address the conflict between science and religion. Yet Richard Cox uses the subject successfully in The God Particle. On the surface, The God Particle tells the stories of two men. Steve Keely is a California businessman who suffers …

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SF’s Own Star Wars

It appears a brushfire is heating up amidst science fiction writers over the direction of the genre. Disputes between and among SF fans as to what types of stories and novels fit within the genre and/or deserve recognition are nothing new. Take, for example, the debate over whether J. K. …

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Nam-A-Rama No Laugh-a-Rama

World War II has Catch-22 The Korean War has MASH I’m not sure what book will ultimately serve as the satirical insight to the Vietnam War. I do know it isn’t Nam-A-Rama. Nam-A-Rama is a farce about “Almost Captains” Armstrong (first name Jack, of course) and Gearheardt, two Marine helicopter …

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Walking in the Literary Clouds with Cloud Atlas

Cloud Atlas is a novel perhaps unlike any other. In essence, British author David Mitchell links six novellas together in one fashion or another and, thus, seeks to form a whole. The novel starts with the diary of an American traveling on a schooner in the South Pacific in the …

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The anachronism of The Knack and Blow-Up

When I first discovered the joy of foreign films, I decided a salutary mission would be to see all the films that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film and the non-US winners of the Golden Palm (Palme d’Or) Award at the Cannes Film Festival. The venture teaches a few …

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Getting Up-Close and Personal with the Black Death

John Kelly’s The Great Mortality is one of those works that proves history can be a wonderful read and not merely a dry recounting of events and dates. The Great Mortality is subtitled “An Intimate History of the Black Death.” Intimate accurately describes how Kelly tells the story. In Kelly’s …

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Footprints: The Life and Music of Wayne Shorter

To a certain extent, Wayne Shorter is one of the guideposts on my way to becoming a jazz fan. A two-CD retrospective, Footprints: The Life and Music of Wayne Shorter, served as definitive confirmation of that fact. Back in the late 70s, through a mutual acquaintance I ended up with …

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Foop!

Time travel, dystopias, robots, other planets, aliens. All these archetypes of science fiction — along with cigarette-smoking monkeys — make their appearance in one fashion or another in Foop!, the debut novel by Chris Genoa. Foop! is a comedic and at times scatological look at where the Earth may be …

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Penile humor and the First Amendment

Well, at least Michigan is safe from televised jokes told by a human penis. The First Amendment doesn’t protect that penis according to a decision (PDF file) by the Michigan Court of Appeals. Seems Timothy Huffman produced a program called “Tim’s Area of Control” on a public access cable channel …

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