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For Those Who Dare to Think Differently

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According to a recent article in The Wall Street Journal, Israel’s Dan Shechtman knows how difficult it can be to think differently from a consensus of scientists.

quasicrystal pattern In 1982, Shechtman discovered the patterned but nonrepeating atomic structures of quasicrystals.  Members of the scientific community ridiculed Schectman, calling his discovery nonsense, a physical impossibility and denouncing him as a “quasi-scientist.” Yet, last week Shechtman’s discovery won him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry!  The opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal noted,

“Today, Mr. Shechtman’s observations have been fully validated and quasicrystals are beginning to have commercial applications. But his story is a reminder that a consensus of scientists is no substitute for, and often a bar to, great science. That’s especially so when the consensus hardens into a dogmatic and self-satisfied enterprise.
Isn’t there another field in which a similar kind of consensus has taken hold, with similarly unpleasant consequences for those who question its core assumptions?”

What about healthcare?

Is it nonsense to question if health and illness are totally physical in nature, and therefore all therapies should be physical ones?

I’ve noticed a growing acceptance of alternative approaches to conventional Western medicine. U.S. News recently reported some of the surprising findings of the 2007 National Health Interview Survey.  The report noted that three out of four health care workers turn to some form of complementary or alternative healthcare option. Doctors and nurses were even twice as likely to do so than non-clinical health workers. 

I believe the beneficial effect of spiritual thinking–seeing ourselves as more than a physical body and keeping our thoughts in tune with an all-loving divinity–can bring about favorable health outcomes.  Many may be skeptical of this approach, but as Shechtman’s experience proved, what’s outside the box today may be tomorrow’s Nobel Prize.  

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About Bill Scott

Professionally, I'm a licensed architect in both Washington and California State. I love architecture, but when it comes to priorities, it’s hard to top good health. That’s why I’ve shifted my interest from the physical to the mental environment that we abide in. My articles focus on presenting helpful ideas regarding the important connection between what we think and our health. I’ve been writing for Blogcritics and other online and print publications since 2011 and I was published in the international medical/science journal, "Global Advances in Health and Medicine" in 2012. I also serve as the media and legislative liaison for Christian Science in Washington State. Feel free to contact me at: washington@compub.org or on Twitter @WilliamEdScott.
  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/dr-dreadful/ Dr Dreadful

    “Is it nonsense to question if health and illness are totally physical in nature, and therefore all therapies should be physical ones?”

    No, but it is logical to deduce that since 100% of the organs in which ailments manifest themselves are contained within the physical body, there ought to be physical remedies for all of them.

    There’s absolutely no evidence to suggest, for example, that depression is caused by an affliction of the soul, and plenty of it to suggest that it’s caused by a chemical imbalance within the brain.

    The “they all laughed at Galileo” argument (in its various guises including the one that appears here) is fallacious. Certainly the history of science is replete with theories that went against the accepted mainstream and were scorned by the “establishment”. That doesn’t mean they were all correct.

    Some, like Shechtman’s quasicrystals, have been validated by subsequent observation, experimentation and testing. (Good science in action.) The vast majority of them, including most “alternative” health claims, were and have subsequently been proven to be nonsense.

  • Brian aka Guppusmaximus

    @ Dr. Dreadful,

    “…there ought to be physical remedies for all of them.”

    I agree,but, now that there is some “evidence” that suggests that Schizophrenia might be a disease based on time that might also suggest that the cure could come in a form without any physical traits.
    Not to say that it has anything to do with a “divine” being(?) or spirituality.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/dr-dreadful/ Dr Dreadful

    Hi Brian,

    The research cited in the blog post you linked to suggests that schizophrenia sufferers have an impaired perception of time, not that time is somehow causing their illness. Perception is based in the brain and the nervous system, so as such, schizophrenia is still a disease of the physical body.

  • Brian aka Guppusmaximus

    @ Dr. Dreadful,

    True. I stand corrected. I guess I was thinking more about the cure being not as physical.

  • http://www.lunch.com/DrJosephSMaresca Dr Joseph S Maresca

    “I believe the beneficial effect of spiritual thinking–seeing ourselves as more than a physical body and keeping our thoughts in tune with an all-loving divinity–can bring about favorable health outcomes.”

    Response: A positive mental attitude can help to prevent excess stress, depression and bodily sweat. This alone is not curative
    although it is preventive in nature. Minimally, a positive mental attitude helps all of us cope with life, as well as illness and loss.

    Over a lifetime, we see many images, read hundreds or thousands of books, hear millions of words spoken and conceive of thousands of ideas or notions. Where does all of this stuff go ultimately? Is the content lost or does it remain on some physical or spiritual level that we haven’t yet been able to replicate independently or by the scientific method ?

    We live in at least 3 dimensions but there are more. Are the yet to be discovered dimensions places where our thoughts and experience during life reside after death occurs?

    We know that death is an iterative process best described in the agonal phase; wherein, the body slowly but surely shuts down until the physical body itself becomes virtually all acidic with a pH value approaching zero.

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