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Home / Music / Music Review: Tokyo Police Club – ‘Melon Collie and the Infinite Radness (Part 1)’ EP
Overall, there's some good tunes here worth checking out on TPC's latest release.

Music Review: Tokyo Police Club – ‘Melon Collie and the Infinite Radness (Part 1)’ EP

Tokyo Police Club

Canadian-based Tokyo Police Club have long been a bright shiny example of radio-ready mainstream power pop, with a series of catchy guitar anthems reliably embedded into each album. The band is getting cheeky with its too-hip title Melon Collie and the Infinite Radness (Part 1), an obvious dig on the Smashing Pumpkins. And like most TPC releases, we have a winning danceable rock tune opening things up with “Not My Girl.” Next, the passable “PCH” is a descriptive song that leans a little more on the synths and drums than guitars.

“The Ocean” is a crisp pop song that’s almost too smooth, where lead singer David Monks croons, ”I had a little too much to drink/It goes down a little faster than I think/Is it really gonna be ok?” I expected a big chorus and got a light piano fill instead. “Losing You” is a little more in the ballpark with its bouncy chorus and goofy synth break. “Please Don’t Let Me Down” is a pure power pop single with Josh Hook’s guitar leading the way, making it a keeper. Overall, there’s some good tunes here worth checking out.

Amazon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptcAdSpWp-o

About The Power Popaholic

The Power Popaholic (aka Aaron Kupferberg) is a music blogger that focuses on the genre of power pop and melodic rock. I also report on live shows, tour dates, gossip, MP3′s, videos and just about anything a power pop fan could want. Reviews have been featured in The Rock and Roll Report, The Christian Science Monitor, Virgin Top Music Blogs and The Seattle Post-Intelligencer. To read past reviews visit www.powerpopaholic.com

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