Tuesday , December 4 2018
Home / Books / Book Reviews / Book Review: ‘Bossypants’ by Tina Fey
A witty, humorous take on Tina Fey by Tina Fey.

Book Review: ‘Bossypants’ by Tina Fey

It seems like Tina Fey became a household name when she parodied Sarah Palin in a now infamous series of sketches that were aired the same year Palin ran as John McCain’s vice-president. She was, of course, on the scene for much longer than that, slowly building her brand, her name, and her voice, but those sketches are what made my friends go from “Tina who?” to “Oh yes, she’s the Saturday Night Live newbie!”

Which she wasn’t.

Tina Fey goes on to cement her voice in Bossypants, a book that could be loosely coined as an autobiography. We get to know the real Tina – or at least, the real Tina she wants us to know. She seems like a normal, busy, at times conflicted human being who happens to be working at her dream job. It’s a fun read that gives you some insight into who she might really be as a person. It also at times makes you think about certain important issues – such as the judgments we seem to hold against mothers for their work choices, the breastfeeding choices, or any other choice for that matter – but I found they got lost a little amidst the side jokes and the one-liners.

Then again, this is not a feminist book; this is a book about Tina Fey, and you do find out more about her than the kind of information you find on her Wikipedia page. It’s a book that made me smile oftentimes, but not laugh outright. At times I felt it was a little convoluted, but when I realised that it read more like the answer a friend might give to a certain question, or like a speech she might be giving, it became a whole lot enjoyable. But ultimately, she is a funny woman whose unique view of the world shines through in her book, as do her wit and humor.

[amazon template=iframe image&asin=B00DWYPFME]

About Sahar

Check Also

Graphic Novel Review: ‘Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman’ by Box Brown from First Second

A peek into the mystery of one of comedy's most complex performers