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‘The Flash’ (2014) Pilot Screened at Comic-Con

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After two appearances in the second season of Arrow, Barry Allen/The Flash (Grant Gustin) has been spun off into his own CW television series set to make its network debut on October 7, 2014. The pilot, written by Arrow co-creators Greg Berlanti and Andrew Kreisberg, Arrow pilot director David Nutter, and Geoff Johns, was one of many that screened at Comic-Con. Since I had only ever seen the Arrow pilot previously, this was my first introduction to this iteration of the Flash.

The episode begins 14 years in the past, on the night at the Allen home when 11-year-old Barry’s mother was killed. Although young Barry and the audience witness an inexplicable electrical storm of some sort within the house, his father was convicted of the crime. Detective Joe West (Jesse L. Martin),an officer at the crime scene that evening, adopts Barry. In the present they work together for the Central City Police Department, with Barry working as an assistant forensic scientist. Barry also strives to prove his father’s innocence by finding his mother’s killer. There’s a slight clue provided about who else was there that fateful night, which those familiar with The Flash comic books will recognize.

Dr. Harrison Wells’ (Tom Cavanagh) S.T.A.R. Labs plays an integral role in the series. A freak accident with a particle accelerator not only gives Barry his superspeed and the abilities that comes with it, like the ability for his body to heal quickly, but it has also affected a number of others, referred to as “metahumans,” like the villain this episode who has the ability to control weather.

While there’s no denying its a CW show and at times it comes across like Central City 90210 with its many good-looking actors and melodramatic moments, there’s a lot to like about the series. The script was interesting and delivered some very good plot twists, particularly a revelation about a major character that had me curious about what was to come. As a young actor having to step up to be the lead in a TV series, Gutsin fit the part well of a young man coming to grips with his new responsibilities and having to step up and be a hero. The special effects team did a very good job. Arrow fans will likely be excited by the scene the heroes share, and there’s more subtle DC Comics Easter eggs for those paying attention, like a “Ferris Air” sign (Green Lantern reference) at the airfield they test Barry’s abilities.

With the success of Smallville and Arrow, I imagine The Flash will find a similar audience and do just as well. Possibly even better since I am going to add it to my queue. Recommend for superhero fans.

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About Gordon S. Miller

Gordon S. Miller is the artist formerly known as El Bicho, the nom de plume he used when he first began reviewing movies online for The Masked Movie Snobs in 2003. Before the year was out, he became that site's publisher. Over the years, he has also contributed to a number of other sites as a writer and editor, such as FilmRadar, Film School Rejects, High Def Digest, and Blogcritics. He is the Publisher of Cinema Sentries. Some of his random thoughts can be found at