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Movie Review: Wild Horses & Renegades

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A few years back I wrote an article about the threat to America’s wild horses in general and the small herd of Mustangs on the Blackjack Mountain preserve in Oklahoma in particular. At that time I laid the blame for the mismanagement of one of America’s greatest natural resources at the feet of the Bureau Of Land Management (BLM) and their close ties to corporations buying leases on public land to run livestock. The BLM is supposedly responsible for the stewardship of all wild lands not currently national parks owned by the federal government in trust for the people of the United States. The acts which govern the terms of their stewardship spell out they are supposed to treat them in manner sensitive to the existing ecosystems. One of the pieces of legislation which applies to these territories is the Wild Free-Roaming Horse And Burro Act passed in 1971 that was designed to preserve existing populations of wild horses and burros on all government owned lands.

Unfortunately it seems the BLM have an awfully interesting interpretation of the terms of their remit and have done everything in their power to reduce the numbers of horses in the wild and find as many ways as possible to contravene not only the spirit of the law, but the letter as well. In my article of 2008, I mistakenly blamed agribusiness as the biggest co-conspirator in this effort to defraud the American public. However, while it is true they have quite a bit of pull within the BLM, they at least aren’t actively destroying the environment which the horses depend on for survival. After all, they too need the pasture land and clean water the horses require. It turns out the real problem is the fact the BLM have been hard at work selling off the last of America’s wilderness to oil, gas and mining companies.

Nothing says wildlife preserve quite like uranium tailings, polluted water, radioactive waste, pools of sulphuric acid, strip mining, oil wells and a night sky light up by the flames from natural gas stand pipes. Yet while everyone’s backs are turned that’s what is happening all across the American West. From Colorado through Montana, Utah down through to Nevada and New Mexico the land is being doled out to responsible environmentalists like BP (remember the Gulf oil spill?) and their friends in the Oil and Gas business. Disappointment Valley in Colorado has a new crop – survey spikes staking out claims for Uranium mines. (There’s still a law on the books that dates back to the gold rush days that allows prospectors to lay claim to any land not privately owned in order to set up a mining operation. Once they’ve laid a claim all they need do is apply to the BLM for permission to “lease” the land and they can begin mining operations. Of course once their lease is expired the country gets it back, but unfortunately these tenants aren’t required to return the property in the same shape they found it and nobody else seems to want to clean up after them.)

It would be nice to say I’m just making this up off the top of my head and there’s no proof to substantiate any of what I’m saying, but the truth of the matter is the picture is actually a lot worse than the one I’ve been painting. All you need do is watch the soon-to-be released documentary Wild Horses And Renegades (It will have its premiere May 12  at the International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula Montana at the Wilma Theatre at 7:00pm.) to find out not only the depth of the BML’s duplicity when it comes to their management of America’s wild lands, but the seriousness of the situation facing the few remaining horses and burros in the wild. I have to warn you though, I’ve recommended to my wife that she not watch the movie, and if you are at all easily upset by scenes of blatant cruelty to animals either be prepared to close your eyes at short notice or to have your heart broken and your stomach turned periodically. While director James Kleinert has done his best to make this movie an homage to the horses he so obviously loves, he has made the decision not to hide the truth of their situation from the viewer.

The ugly truth includes footage from slaughter houses just across the border Mexico where supposedly protected animals somehow end up, the repulsive manner in which the animals are “humanely” rounded up for removal and their treatment by BLM employees rounding them up. While not as visually ugly, truths obtained through the freedom of information act regarding the BLM’s aims and objectives for the wild horse herds, are equally disturbing as they talk about how they can best circumvent the laws meant to preserve the horses. Not only do these documents reveal an orchestrated campaign of disinformation they outline possible ways of removing animals from the wild and subsequently selling them to slaughter. You see in 2004 an amendment (The Burns Amendment, named for its sponsor Senator Conrad Burns of Montana) to the Wild Horse And Burro act was tagged onto the appropriation bill in the Senate that once again allowed for the slaughter of wild horses where it had been originally prohibited. Any animal the BLM considers excess they can now sell for slaughter no matter if its healthy or not.

What makes the movie so powerful are not just the images, too many shots of abuse and they’d lose their power to shock us. Kleinert has very wisely divided the movie up between testimony from a mixture of experts, celebrities and even interviews with BLM mouthpieces and employees, footage of wild horses on the range, images of how the West is being lost to industry and the way the BLM treats the horses under their stewardship. The experts range from former BLM employees who had the gall to believe their job was to protect the areas under their stewardship and were let go, members of Congress from the affected regions – Democrats – who want to see changes made to the way the BLM operates, people working to preserve both the horse and burro population and the wild lands, to ranchers who have seen the lands they used to run cattle on destroyed by pollution. Each of them peel away another layer of the carefully constructed skin of lies spun by the BLM of how everything they do is for the good of the animals and the land.

Of the celebrities, Viggo Mortensen, Sheryl Crow, Willie Nelson, author Scott Momaday and Raul Trujillo make intelligent and impassioned pleas based on facts and the need to conserve something supposedly precious and unique to America. So many pay lip service to the idea of the wide open spaces and how the West is emblematic of the spirit of America, yet most have no problem standing by and letting it be destroyed. The BLM position, as expressed by employees and those who support their policies, of looking at everything in terms of whether or not it is useful is not one conducive to preserving the wild intact. In fact it’s a philosophy which puts them at odds with their directive of stewarding the land and its inhabitants as any horse they deem not “useful” is now slated for slaughter.

The smartest thing director Kleinert has done in this movie is to simply let the BLM condemn themselves through their own actions and words. Listening and watching their high handed behaviour in dealing with public complaints, hearing about the repeated cases of conflict of interest and mismanagement documented by the government’s internal auditors, the number of ex-oil company officials who lobby and work in the Department of the Interior under whose auspices the BLM fall and then watching footage of their safe and humane roundups tells the viewer all we need to know.

Right from the start Kleinert makes no bones about his own personal bias – this film is pro-wild horse and preserve the wild lands and doesn’t care who knows it. It is an impassioned plea to his fellow citizens to do something about preserving a part of their country’s heritage and a warning that those who have been entrusted with that responsibility are failing them badly. Movies like this one are important as they expose ugly truths we might never find out otherwise. It’s one thing to listen to people talk about something, it’s another thing all together to see it with your own eyes. I seriously doubt you’ll come away from watching this movie unmoved. Hopefully it can motivate enough people to make their voices heard and help preserve the American wild horse and the land it needs for survival.

(Those wishing to reserve a copy of the DVD of this movie when it is released can do so by filling out a form at the film’s web site.)

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About Richard Marcus

Richard Marcus is the author of two books commissioned by Ulysses Press, "What Will Happen In Eragon IV?" (2009) and "The Unofficial Heroes Of Olympus Companion". Aside from Blogcritics his work has appeared around the world in publications like the German edition of Rolling Stone Magazine and the multilingual web site Qantara.de. He has been writing for Blogcritics.org since 2005 and has published around 1900 articles at the site.
  • http://www.horsesavers.us Frank Mancuso

    100 years ago we had no oil and horses 100 years from now we will have no oil or horses.

  • jackie parsons

    I am a UK citizen and have been watching helplessly & with horror the scenes of roundups, holding pens and likewise that are available on the internet. The American people need to wake up and stop what is happening not only to their heritage (America was born on the back of the horse) but to their homeland as well. I applaud everyone who has had a hand in the making of this film and hope it is enough to shock the people into stopping the terrible destruction of the wild mustang and the beautiful country in which they live that we, the rest of the world, perceives as ‘America’

  • nicole Thomson

    I also am in the UK and like Jackie watch these terrible injustices and barbaric treatment of wild horses and burros, my God is this really 2011. USA wake up dont let history repeat itself ..this is a genoside on a collosal scale. Thank goodness for this film, and Madelaine Pickens and Laura Leigh and all the people striving to help this most wonderful animal.

  • http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/237422647/wild-horses-and-renegades-saving-americas-wild-hor elizabeth slagsvol

    We can stop this policy of eradication. You can help us make your voices heard…. it’s easy and it feels good. We are half way to our goal.