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TV Review: Freeform’s ‘The Fosters’ on Netflix

Are you a cord cutter, like my household is? But do you miss watching many TV series available only on cable?  My wife and I are the same way. Streaming services like Hulu and Netflix are great ways to find those gems of series otherwise missed. While it can be annoying to wait for an entire cable season to run, it has its advantages, because you can watch as many episodes, as you wish, binge–or not. On Netflix, my wife and I discovered the Freeform (formerly ABC Family) series The Fosters.

The show is described as an offbeat drama that chronicles the ups and downs of an interracial lesbian couple and their multiethnic group of biological, adopted and foster children.  While my upbringing in the church, screams in disgust at the thought of such a situation, my entertainment-craved side cannot get enough of the show. “The Fosters” Stef  Foster (Teri Polo) a San Diego police officer, and Lena Adams (Sherri Saum) a Charter School Vice-Principal are a couple raising their own children along with an entire crew of adopted and foster children.

The children include Stef’s biological son Brandon Foster (David Lambert) from her previous marriage to Mike Foster (Danny Nucci), their adopted children Mariana (Cierra Ramirez), Jesus ( Jake T. Austin in Seasons 1-2, and by Noah Centineo in Seasons 3-5), Jude (Hayden Byerly), and Callie Adams-Foster (Maia Mitchell). In addition, Stef and Lena foster Poppy Sinfuego (Nandy Martin), the younger sister of Callie’s friend, Ximena Sinfuego (Lisseth Chavez), and (in the second half of Season 5) are currently fostering Corey (Dallas Young), whom they plan to adopt.

Throughout the four and half seasons already available on Netflix, there have been many ups and down. Some of the kids find their real parents; the Stef and Lena have marital issues, and even almost lose their house. The series explores the normal everyday situations that we all face at one time or another. The only difference is the added pressure of dealing with the dual prejudices that go alone being both gay and interracial.

I personally find the series intriguing and cannot get enough of it.  When I reached the final available episode, “Prom” (season five, episode nine), I was disappointed that I’d have to wait for next crop to be released on Netflix.  That was just before Christmas of 2017. However, I was excited when I received the notice from Netflix announcing the July release dates. Come July 6, 2018, season five, episodes 10 through 22 will be available on the streaming service. You can say I did a little happy dance, as I eagerly await the rest of the fifth and final season of The Fosters, and just in time for my birthday.

Reviewers Rating 4.5 Stars

About Kevin Surbaugh

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