Tuesday , May 21 2024
The sharp poignancy of Ibsen's classic comes through strongly in a flawed but sincere new production by the young company The Instigators. The tragic story of an unhappy young wife whose hopes of a glorious future of social ascendancy are being dashed before her eyes rings as true today as it did when Ibsen wrote it 125 years ago.

Theater Review (NYC): ‘Hedda Gabler’ by Henrik Ibsen

The sharp poignancy of Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler comes through strongly in a flawed but sincere new production by the young company The Instigators. The tragic story of an unhappy young wife whose hopes of a glorious future of social ascendancy are being dashed before her eyes rings as true today as it did when Ibsen wrote it 125 years ago.

The staging’s main trouble is an inconsistency of tone. Under Fergus Scully’s sly direction Dana Saffran gives us a brash and very American Hedda who jibes well with Laird Reghenas’s dissolute, tattooed Eilert, and with the colloquialisms of the adaptation (“Me and her can never have a future.” “Wow!”). Their interpretation also makes the play’s humor more broad, less subtle, an acceptable choice in itself.

On the other hand, this Hedda’s larger-than-life sarcasm and petulance don’t mesh as well with Taylor Petracek’s milquetoasty and much more European George. It makes it awfully hard to believe that over months of honeymooning, he hasn’t seen through her facade of contentment, scholarly distractions or no.

Jenna Sander as Thea Elvstead in The Instigators' production of 'Hedda Gabler' at The Secret Theatre
Jenna Sander as Thea Elvstead in The Instigators’ production of ‘Hedda Gabler’ at The Secret Theatre

Jenna Sander’s mesmerizingly overwrought Thea seems especially of another world. Or rather, she brings her own with her, devolving Hedda and George into mere characters whenever she’s on stage. She comes across as achingly real, thoroughly in the moment.

Some of the production’s supplemental elements are less than artful. Ineffective sound cues and unsubtle mid-scene lighting changes distract from the story and mood rather than reflecting them.

But the production mostly does right by the tale’s inexorable development, which centers on the unfolding of Hedda’s deadly frustration. Her coldness thaws as she and Eilert sit back-to-back, hot and cold at the same time, and reminisce: “You were just like me, starving for life.” We feel for George when he confesses to being “green with envy” of the intellectual brilliance in Eilert’s fateful new manuscript.

Judge Brack (Mark Couchot) doesn’t bring quite enough presence to make the menace the character presents fully believable. But Thea is again transfixing when Eilert casts her off despite her tireless help with the manuscript. Eilert himself captivates as he confesses to having lost it. And in the climactic scene when Hedda urges him to kill himself and “do it gloriously,” his despair is almost palpable. So is hers as she faces the realization that, at least in her limited reality, her own dreams of glory have died.

The Instigators are presenting Hedda Gabler in repertory with The Importance of Being Earnest, an equally foundational work of modern theater. Despite its rough edges, this production suggests a serious future for the young, evolving company. They are at The Secret Theatre in Long Island City, Queens, through October 16.


About Jon Sobel

Jon Sobel is Publisher and Executive Editor of Blogcritics as well as lead editor of the Culture & Society section. As a writer he contributes most often to Music, where he covers classical music (old and new) and other genres, and Culture, where he reviews NYC theater. Through Oren Hope Marketing and Copywriting at http://www.orenhope.com/ you can hire him to write or edit whatever marketing or journalistic materials your heart desires. Jon also writes the blog Park Odyssey at http://parkodyssey.blogspot.com/ where he is on a mission to visit every park in New York City. He has also been a part-time working musician, including as lead singer, songwriter, and bass player for Whisperado.

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