Wednesday , January 19 2022

Tag Archives: Science

Little Dead Dudes Messing Up Paleoanthropology

We mentioned at the end of October the fascinating discovery of a new species of little humans on the Indonesian island of Flores. Now, inevitably, controversy has erupted over whether Homo floresiensis is descended from an archaic human species, Homo erectus, or from modern humans, Homo sapien. The knives are …

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Tiny Terrors of the Tropics

Remains of a 3 1/2 tall archaic human species, Homo floresiensis, have been found on an island 370 miles east of Bali – the species may have survived into the 16th century: Despite their stature, they were mighty hunters. They made stone tools with which they speared giant rats, clubbed …

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Up 3-0, 86 Years

Sox up 3-0 – if they blow this they will be the only team in MLB history to have collapsed worse than the 2004 Yankees. And the Sox aren’t just up 3 games to none: they have never been behind in the three games. They have won with the bat, …

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Curt Schilling: Frankenstein

Curt Schilling’s performance in game 6 for the Red Sox was the real nail in the Yankee’s coffin. I had a gut feeling of soothsaying certainty after the Sox, behind Schilling’s stunning performance, won another nail-biter 4-2 that game 7 would be a blow out – just ask my wife. …

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Sobering Bono

U2 has a new album coming out in November (Brendan Creecy reviews the single “Vertigo” here, Damon Muma here), was just nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but Bono has other things besides music on his mind – he spoke at the UK Labour Party Conference yesterday: …

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Ancient Bodybuilders Harold Zinkin and Jack LaLanne: One Gone, One Going Strong at 90

I love these crazy old bodybuilders and fitness freaks – they carved out a niche in the culture when bulging muscles and a serious fitness regimen was considered freakish and obsessive, and they were inventors and entrepreneurs as well. The first “Mr. California” and inventor of the Universal exercise machine, …

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Pushing the Envelope: More Thoughts On the Olympics

Watching a large block of the Olympics last night yielded a few semi-random thoughts: The men’s and women’s gymnastics apparatus finals: I can understand why these incredibly strong, flexible, tough, determined, fearless, crazed little freaks of nature (in the best possible sense) dedicate their (mostly) young lives to their sport: …

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Pain Killer by Barry Meier

Politics play a critical role in how medical patients are treated. Cultural norms and the politics that implement those norms determine even what is considered a treatable medical condition in the first place. Nowhere has the politics of medicine been more evident over the last century than in the treatment …

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