Tuesday , August 14 2018

Sonny’s Boner

I have a certain amount of affection for Sonny Bono: his self-deprecating personality was appealing (I met him once at his restaurant in Palm Springs), I liked Sonny and Cher as recording artists and entertainers, and I was sad when he skied into a tree.

But the other side of Bono, the politician/songwriter who wanted to see copyright extended FOREVER, has done great harm to our culture through the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, which passed through Congress in 1998 and was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court earlier this year. That guy sucks sphincter.

Illegal Art has a new our compilation project, “Sonny Bono Is Dead”:

    This act diminished the public’s ability to access older works while granting more control to corporations anxious to preserve a few copyrights from the 1920’s. Copyright law continues to expand and defeat its original purpose of promoting advances in the arts and sciences. These excesses damage the evolution of our culture and only serve corporate interests.

    We encourage artists to liberally sample from works that would have fallen into the Public Domain by the year 2004 had the Sonny Bono Act failed. Artists are also encouraged to create new works by sampling Sonny Bono’s output (or other artists who embraced the notion of copyright lasting forever). Please email [email protected] to receive updates on this project and additional instructions on participating.

    This project will be released as part of our theme-based compilation series (past projects include Deconstructing Beck, Extracted Celluloid, and Commercial Ad Hoc, with others smaller open-submission projects being presented on the web and on the compilation Bricolage #1). Although we generally only release audio CDs, we remain open to other media. We’d particularly be interested in appropriations of the Mickey Mouse character who should have gone into the Public Domain in 2004.

Peruse this list of songs that whose copyrights would have expired without the Bono Act:

    Anything copyrighted from 1923-1928 should have entered the Public Domain by the year 2004. A great list of works has been researched by ASU law professor Dennis S. Karjala and can be found on his Subverted Public Domain List. We have added the following recordings for later years. Feel free to send us further additions.

    1928
    Popular Hit Recordings

    “Is There Anything Wrong In That?” by Helen Kane
    “I Wanna Be Loved By You” by Helen Kane
    “Jazz Holiday” by Ted Lewis & His Jazz Band
    “(Goodbye, Broadway) Hello, Montreal!” by Ted Lewis & His Jazz Band
    “My Man” by Fanny Brice
    “That’s My Weakness Now” by Paul Whiteman & His Orchestra featuring Bing Crosby
    “Because My Baby Don’t Mean Maybe Now” by Ruth Etting
    “Let’s Misbehave” by Helen Kane
    “Mississippi Mud” by Paul Whiteman’s Orchestra
    “Makin’ Whoopie” by Eddie Cantor
    “Let’s Misbehave” by Irving Aaronson & His Commanders
    “Little Orphan Annie” by the Coon Sanders Nighhawks
    “Diga Diga Doo” by Duke Ellington & His Cotton Club Orchestra
    Other Important Recordings
    “West End Blues” by Louis Armstrong
    “Pinetop’s Boogie Woogie” by Pinetop Smith
    “The Mooche” by Duke Ellington
    “Muggles” by Louis Armstrong

    1927
    Popular Hit Recordings

    “Sweetheart Of Sigma Chi” by Ted Lewis & His Band
    “My Blue Heaven” by Gene Austin
    “Mine, All Mine” by the Coon-Sanders Nighthawks
    “Mary (What Are You Waiting For?)” by Paul Whiteman & His Orchestra
    “Changes” by Paul Whiteman & His Orchestra
    “Blue Skys/Falling In Love With You” by Jesse Crawford
    “Fifty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong” by Sophie
    Tucker with Miff Mole & His Little Molers
    “Shaking The Blues Away” by Ruth Etting
    “Varsity Drag” by Ruth Etting
    “It All Belongs To Me” by Ruth Etting
    “In A Little Spanish Town” by Carson Robison
    “My Pretty Girl” by Jean Goldkette & His Orchestra
    “Back Water Blues” by Bessie Smith
    “I’m Coming, Virginia” by Bix Beiderbecke
    “Lucky Lindy” by Nat Shilkret
    “I’m Gona Meet My Sweetie Now” by Jane Green
    “Black and Tan Fantasy” by Duke Ellington & His Orchestra
    “Honky Tonk Train Blues” by Meade Lux Lewis, first boogie woogie hit

    Other important recordings
    “Singin’ The Blues” by Frankie Trumbauer’s Orch., with Bix & Lang
    “Potato Head Blues” by Louis Armstrong
    “Stardust” by Hoagy Carmichael

This sounds like fun – I may even whip something up.

About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: [email protected], Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.

Check Also

Interview: Karyn White on Returning to Music: “Unfinished Business”

People come and go in the tough world of music; however, when a true star rekindles their illumination in such a powerful way, you just know it’s destiny.