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March 16, 2010 is Blue Bella day...

Nick Moss, Kilborn Alley Blues Band, Matthew Stubbs, Cashbox Kings Albums Due March 16

Elgin, Illinois-based independent label Blue Bella Records, home to some of the biggest names on the contemporary blues circuit, has announced its spring 2010 release schedule, with four albums slated for release on March 16, 2010.
Nick MossLabel founder Nick Moss is releasing his eighth album through the label, Privileged, alongside Killborn Alley Blues Band whose Better Off Now is their third release for the label.  The other two albums come from artists making their Blue Bella debuts: Cash Box Kings will release I-94 Blues and Matthew Stubbs is releasing Medford & Main.

Moss has been nominated for 16 Blues Music Awards — the highest honor in blues — over the course of his career and al0ng with his band, The Flip Tops, is up for Band of The Year at this year's BMAs.  He's also won "Song Of The Year" and "Band Of The Year" from the Blues Blast Music Awards the past two years, respectively.

Killborn Alley Blues Band has been nominated for BMAs after each of their first two records and won the "Sean Costello Rising Star Award" at the Blues Blast Music Awards last year.

Matthew Stubbs is another artist who embodies that "up-and-coming" label, gaining attention as a budding solo artist while continuing to tour and perform with the legendary Charlie Musselwhite.  He was nominated for a Boston Music Award as "Best Blues Act."

Cash Box Kings not only recorded the bulk of their 15-track album live in the studio with minimal overdubs, they did it in one day.  In fact, they recorded 17 songs during the session.  Without hearing a note, that gives some indication about the way these guys approach their work.  I-94 Blues marks their first album without Travis Koopman.

Artwork and tracklisting for all 4 records are expected to be released soon.

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