Sunday , September 27 2020
It is this simple: consumers should be able to make copies of their own DVDs. Period.

New DMCA-Based Suit

Why all of the activity regarding DMCA exemption requests? Because it is an egregious denial of consumer’s basic rights that they cannot make copies of their own DVDs or copy-protected CDs. How can this possibly be justified?

321 Studios says it can’t:

    Hollywood fought back against a maker of DVD copying software, saying the company is allegedly trafficking tools of digital theft.

    Seven major motion picture studios filed a counterclaim Thursday in U.S. District Court, Northern District of California against 321 Studios, makers of DVD Copy Plus and DVD X Copy.

    The software sold at stores nationwide allows the user to make a copy of a DVD to a blank CD or DVD by defeating the copy protections encoded onto the original movie disc — activity the studios say is a legal no-no.

    The movie studios say the software contains the power of digital piracy, and asked the court to enjoin 321 Studios from selling it or distributing it further. The studios also seek damages from any proceeds derived from the company’s software sales.

    “It’s like somebody selling a digital crowbar. It’s like breaking into the castle if you will,” said Patricia Benson, an attorney for the studios. [AP]

Actually no, it isn’t. My daughter is 3 and she plays either Shrek, The Wizard of Oz, Snow White, Toy Story 1 or 2, or The Emperor’s New Groove EVERY FREAKING DAY OF THE WEEK. Because she is 3 and doesn’t have the dexterity of a jeweler yet, these DVDs tend to wear out rather quickly. I should be able to make a copy of a new DVD when I first get it in defense against the predations of little fingers. Hollywood can shove my lawfully obtained smudged, scratched and unplayable copy of Shrek sideways if it thinks otherwise.

    The studios still hold that both 321 Studios products violate the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, which makes illegal the distribution of any technology or device that allows the user to circumvent copy protections put in place by the content owner.

    Elizabeth Sedlock, a spokeswoman for 321 Studios, says the company has sold about 150,000 copies of both software titles combined. The software titles may offer the user a hotly debated solution to making back-up copies of “Shrek,” but it’s not illegal, she said.

    “We allow consumers to make a back-up copy of their DVDs,” Sedlock said.

As this campaign against consumers and their enablers becomes more widely known and people realize what the stakes are, the public reaction will force the craven politicians who have sold their souls to the copyright industry to buy their souls back or be cast upon the scratched-DVD heap of history.

A law suit like this forces the public’s attention upon this malfeasance – why do you think the studios waited until now?

Buy them up below – they make great Christmas presents.

About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: [email protected], Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.

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