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Blogcritics interivew 'I Am Evidence' Directors Trish Adlesic and Geeta Gandbhir

Interview: ‘I Am Evidence’ Directors Trish Adlesic and Geeta Gandbhir – Part I

I Am Evidence, Trish Adlesic, Geeta Gandbhir, Directors, HBO, untested rape kits
(L to R) Geeta Gandbhir, Trish Adlesic, ‘I Am Evidence,’ Director Interview at HBO (photo Carole Di Tosti)

Tribeca Film Festival held the World Premiere and screening of I Am Evidence, (directed by Trish Adlesic and Geeta Gandbhir), a compelling documentary which follows the story of four survivors of rape as they attempt to gain justice over a period of many years. During the process that they contact and work with law enforcement, they and filmmakers highlight the fate of what at one point amounted to 400,000 untested rape kits filled with evidence that various police departments left forgotten on storage unit shelves because rape is a low priority, high complexity crime. Behind each of the 400,000 + kits is the DNA of a woman who was sexually assaulted and who waits for her perpetrator’s DNA to be cross-matched with known criminals, serial rapists, murderers, through the federal database, CODIS.

Rape victims often hear nothing from police departments for years. Oftentimes, departments obviate working on such cases. This often leads to miscarriages of justice and an unfettered crime spree. Research has shown many rapists are serial rapists. Some serial rapists murder. In one example in the film a serial rapist raped 10 women until he was picked up. The egregious negligence of  various police departments across the nation who allow criminals to run free is one of the many issues directors Trish Adlesic and Geeta Gandbhir examine and explore during their journey shadowing selected women survivors.

I Am Evidence, Trish Adlesic, Geeta Gandbhir, untested rape kits, end the backlog, serial rapists, rape, sexual assault, TFF
A sealed rape kit that must be tested, ‘I Am Evidence,’ TFF World Premiere (photo courtesy of the film)

Filmmakers show there is hope as the backlog of rape kits is slowly being addressed. More states are passing laws to enforce the testing of the kits. The film focuses on the backlog issues, the causes and solutions and the heroes in the fight, like Kym Worthy, Detroit prosecutor, whose untiring work to test Detroit’s 11,000 kits is resulting in prosecutions that get rapists off the streets. The shining moments of the film reveal the survivors who are overcomers: they remain unapologetic about the miscarriages of justice that have occurred and have become advocates to change the laws so that every rape kit is tested, matched up in the criminal data base nationwide and followed up so perpetrators are caught and tried. They inspire hope as they encourage other women to come forward and join the fight to end this systemic, institutional injustice of backlogged, untested rape kits..

 

I met with directors Trish Adlesic and Geeta Gandbhir at HBO offices a few days after the film screened. 

I loved the film. Could you speak to what the title refers and what the film is about?

Trish: Well, the title came very organically through the process of understanding the journey for women who have been through this violence of sexual assault. In pursuing subjects for the film, I wanted to find someone who had not had their rape kit tested yet in Detroit, Michigan because Detroit had a backlog of over 11,000 untested rape kits. I thought that it would be incredible to find someone who was still looking for their kit and still looking for justice. There was an organization called The Sasha Center which is geared toward the needs of African American women because the church is predominately African American. The Sasha Center (it provides sexual assault services for holistic healing and awareness), had someone they were working with who was still looking for her rape kit. She agreed to speak with me. When she walked into the room, she had this phenomenally beautiful pink hair and this beautiful skin. I looked down to see, “I Am Evidence” on her T-shirt. I immediately got chills. I thought, I’m about to have a profound experience.

Ericka?

Ericka Murria, Trish Adlesic, I Am Evidence, TFF World Premiere Q & A
(L to R): Ericka Murria and Trish Adlesic, TFF World Premiere Q & A, ‘I Am Evidence’ (photo Carole Di Tosti)

Geeta: Yes. And what is interesting is that Ericka is deeply involved in her church. That statement is used in her church and it is sort of a traditional saying, “I Am Evidence,” a profound statement. So she took it and basically we reprised it in the sense of talking about her rape kit. It’s a powerful statement. And she makes statements about this in the film. She says that she is evidence that a rape kit is not just a rape kit. It’s not just DNA, there’s a person behind it. It’s also evidence of being able to overcome the struggle that goes along with the violence she experienced as her personal experience. So this background about Ericka was a big part of the decision for I Am Evidence to be the title.

Trish: Yes. It’s incredible because it’s a double entendre. The body is a living, breathing crime scene. We are evidence. But the poetry around her is that we are the evidence that we can heal and grow and we can get beyond this, because this kind of violence is so debilitating for people. I found it so inspirational that she had the ability to say those words. I mean anyone can relate to the fact that we are evidence of the lives we live and how we handle trauma and challenges in our lives. I thought that would be something everyone could relate to.

Did she help to evolve the film’s uplifting tone? Could you talk about the extent to which she may have influenced that?

Geeta: I think she did. But there’s an arc, is there not Trish? I think with the subjects that we follow, the women that we follow have an arc. Over a period of time, this was her organic journey. Obviously, her journey was ultimately uplifting. She’s a powerful person.

Trish: Yes, she is very spiritual and that’s the case. She did have challenges. Her kit was found. It was tested and there were really hard days for her to undergo in that process. Ultimately, she came to a place of acceptance characterized by the word that she uses for it in the film: “unapologetic.” In other words we don’t have to apologize for the things that have happened to us. It’s OK to feel that pain and to want to have some satisfaction out of being hurt, and you really have justice. And the arc is the unapologetic moment and the moment of acceptance that, while I may not get a victory in court, I was heard. That’s what matters most to all of the victims of this kind of violence: the fact that they actually are given that opportunity for justice.

Geeta Gandbhir, Helena, I Am Evidence, rape, sexual assault, untested rape kits, end the backlog,
(L to R): Geeta Gandbhir and Helena (film subject) TFF World Premiere Q & A ‘I Am Evidence’ (photo Carole Di Tosti)

You helped in that arc. You helped to inspire her journey. Could you talk a little bit about that and how long the process was as she really was at the forefront of your expose.

Trish: It was about two and one-half years from the moment I interviewed her. I began to contact the prosecutor to find out if there could be some way in which they could try to locate her kit. She simultaneously had met with Ms. Worthy at a fund raising event for the backlog through an organization called the 490 Group. It’s a group of African American women in Detroit who are raising funds to test the kits. Both efforts converged and her kit was located. I think that certainly her participation in the film brought this opportunity. Eventually, her kit would have been found because they are continuing to test all the kits, but it wouldn’t have happened necessarily in the timeline that it did.

Geeta: I have to say that the film had a profound experience on the women because of Trish. Trish is the producer and co-director, and Trish had a profound impact on the women because she was there from the inception. I came onto the film a little bit later, but Trish was there from the beginning. I think that the idea, the thought that someone is working with you, that someone wants to hear your voice, gives you a sense of empowerment. That’s not to decry the fact that these women in their own right are very powerful. But I think that when someone holds out their hand to support you, it makes a big difference.

In our presence at the World Premiere after the film screening in the Q and A, Ericka sang to a packed audience in the theater, which takes courage. And she announced that she’s running for office.

Trish: Yes. City Council. How about that? (Trish laughs). She’s smart, she’s very smart.

Geeta: She’s an incredible force, I mean with or without us and the film.

Ericka Murria, Trish Adlesic, Geeta Gandbhir, Helena, Mariska Hargitay, Kym Worthy, TFF World Premiere Q & A, I Am Evidence
(L to R): Ericka Murria, Trish Adlesic, Geeta Gandbhir, Helena, Mariska Hargitay (Producer with Trish Adlesic, Nancy Abraham), Kym Worthy, Q & A after World Premiere screening ‘I Am Evidence’ (photo Carole Di Tosti)

So there was a convergence of events which reveals a kind of synchronicity. This leads me to ask this question. Did this project choose you or did you choose it? How did the film evolve?

Trish: That’s a great question and it’s a question we’re always asked. I want to give the backstory so it’s clear. I had worked on the television show Law and Order: SVU for 14 years with Mariska Hargitay, and we became friends through that work together. I began to produce documentaries because I was potentially going to be affected by the issue of fracking in my community in upstate New York. That led me to do these films that had a profound effect on my life (Gasland and Gasland II). I saw the power of the medium and I thought, well, I’m not getting any younger. How do I want to spend my time? I feel like for me this opportunity has been a dream come true to do this work. It’s honestly gratifying.

Mariska saw that journey for me and I knew that the backlog was at the forefront of her focus for her foundation (A Joyful Heart Foundation), and we kept saying let’s do a project together. Let’s do something. And it led to doing this film. You know it’s her first documentary. I was excited to do everything I could to give it its best shot and bring it into the light and to bring in all the best people I knew in the documentary world to help complement the work we were doing. So that’s how the film came about.

I brought Geeta on the project. I knew Geeta from working with her before. I trust her work and knew that Geeta would understand and care greatly as I do, and so she was someone that I really wanted to bring in on the film.

I Am Evidence, untested rape kits, end the backlog, Trish Adlesic, Geeta Gandbhir, rapist, sexual assault, serial rapists
Untested rape kits, ‘I Am Evidence,’ (photo from the film)

Geeta: It was such an honor for me when Trish and I worked together. Obviously, I really respect her and what she’s done. We were talking about doing this film for a long period of time.

Trish: I was serenading her. (Trish laughs)

Geeta: I wasn’t able to. I had other things. Then finally there came the time. So it was Trish who brought me on. Also, I had worked with HBO for a long time; I started with them when the levees broke in New Orleans. That was when I became hooked on Social Justice issues similar to Trish, and I realized that these documentaries gave my life meaning. With this work you feel like you’re making some kind of impact, some kind of a difference.

Then, finally, it felt like the time was right. I think Trish and the project and Sheila Nevins (President of HBO Documentary Films), had something to do with it. Once they all say, it’s time…

Trish: She’s the Goddess (referring to Sheila Nevins).

Geeta: …you come on board. Honestly, it’s been incredibly rewarding and meaningful.

You knew through Mariska that there was a problem.

Trish: I did. We had done an episode at SVU about an untested rape kit. One of the women who actually is in our film, Helena, had an episode written for her. It’s called Behave. That’s when I first learned about the rape kit backlog. I saw what she he had been through with law enforcement and how she was being re-victimized by not being heard.

I think for a lot of the women whom I’ve spoken with, that very re-victimization almost felt worse for them than the assault itself. These were the very people who had been set up to be there for them. Yet, these very people in fact were blaming them and not believing them. Rape survivors felt so violated by that. First, it’s incredible that they have the ability to come forward to discuss such a traumatic experience. It is so hard to tell your story. Then for them to go through the re-victimization with the police?

So I learned about the untested rape kits that way and learned more and more when news about Detroit’s untested kits broke in 2009. And I saw the heroism of Kym Worthy and thought, this has got to be a documentary. It’s amazing to be in this moment at this time.

Part II of the interview with I Am Evidence directors to follow.

For my review of the film, CLICK HERE.

For the link to I AM EVIDENCE the website, CLICK HERE.

To see how your state is dealing with the backlog of untested rape kits CLICK HERE.

 

About Carole Di Tosti

Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D. is a published writer, novelist and poet. She authors three blogs: The Fat and the Skinny, All Along the NYC Skyline, A Christian Apologists' Sonnets. She contributed articles for Technorati on various trending topics. She guest writes for other blogs. She covers NYC trending events and writes articles promoting advocacy. She was a former English Instructor. Her published dissertation is referenced in three books, two by Margo Ely.

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