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FTC

FTC is the abbreviated name assigned to the Federal Trade Commission, the federal government agency charged with making sure all is fair in love and trade as relates to the American consumer. The agency was established in 1914 by the Federal Trade Commission Act to promote consumer protection and combat anti-competitive practices, such as monopolies.

More recently, the FTC has represented three letters striking fear into the hearts of bloggers everywhere, as the agency has begun to take steps towards regulating the wild, wild west world of the blogosphere.

Specifically, as of December 2009, the FTC will begin requiring full disclosure of any payments made to bloggers in exchange for product endorsements.

Such payments would include not only monetary compensation, but also products bloggers often receive for review purposes — which in theory could mean anything from cars, trips, and the like, to the CDs, DVDs, and books thousands of bloggers routinely write about at sites such as Blogcritics Magazine.

As could be expected, bloggers have a lot to say about the FTC — and you'll find them talking about it at sites like Google Blog and Huffington Post.

About Glen Boyd

Glen Boyd is the author of Neil Young FAQ, released in May 2012 by Backbeat Books/Hal Leonard Publishing. He is a former BC Music Editor and current contributor, whose work has also appeared in SPIN, Ultimate Classic Rock, The Rocket, The Source and other publications. You can read more of Glen's work at the official Neil Young FAQ site. Follow Glen on Twitter and on Facebook.

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Fête Galante: The Anatomy of Melancholy with soprano Sherezade Panthaki and the Four Nations Ensemble with illustrated talks by Tav Holmes at the Italian Academy in New York on May 17, 2018. (COPYRIGHT: Benjamin Chasteen for ASPECT Foundation for Music & Arts)

Concert Review: Four Nations Ensemble and Sherezade Panthaki – ‘Fête Galante’ (NYC, 17 May 2018)

The music of the Fête Galante-era composers like Jean-Marie Leclair counteracted the grand style of their predecessors, just as Watteau's paintings of regular people enjoying simple pleasures in the outdoors contrasted with the heavy subject matter of the art he'd grown up with.