Tuesday , September 22 2020

Double Standards On Racism?

I find it fascinating that some blacks aren’t defended by the civil rights establishment or other advocacy groups if they do not happen to hew to a designated set of political positions, as if taking political positions outside of this designated dogma somehow renders them fair game for racism. It’s rather astonishing and breathtakingly hypocritical, as pointed out by Project 21, “the national leadership network of conservative African-Americans”:

    Over the past few months, and peaking this week with her appointment, cartoonists have been using Dr. Rice’s race as a point of ridicule. Demeaning political cartoons by Pat Oliphant and Jeff Danziger accentuate Dr. Rice’s black features and feature her speaking in rural southern dialect. Garry Trudeau called her “Brown Sugar” in his “Doonesbury” comic strip. Earlier this year, cartoonist Ted Rall questioned Dr. Rice’s race in a comic suggesting she was President Bush’s “house nigga” and needed “racial re-education.”

    …On November 17, radio host John “Sly” Sylvester called Dr. Rice “Aunt Jemima” and secretary of state Colin Powell “Uncle Tom” on his WTDY (Madison, Wisconsin) radio show. Sylvester, who also is the station’s program director, is refusing to apologize, but has said, “I will apologize to Aunt Jemima.” The station’s owner, the Mid-West Broadcast Group, is declining to discipline him.

    In late October, a conservative host at WISN in nearby Milwaukee was suspended for a week for calling an illegal Mexican immigrant a “wetback.”

    While some local leaders have condemned Sylvester’s comments, the Madison chapter of the NAACP has so far declined to make a statement. Project 21 asked the NAACP’s national leadership to condemn Rall’s racist cartoon in July, but no action was taken. Jesse Jackson and the National Association of Black Journalists were also contacted at the time. They took no action.

    “To hear the leftists tell it, conservative blacks have become the new ‘trash class’ of American society,” said Project 21 [and Blogcritics] member Michael King. “And with the continued cricket-filled silence from the professional civil rights crowd, the Jesse Jacksons and Al Sharptons give tacit permission and acceptance of such language and tactics.”

    King’s comments are echoed by Project 21 member Mychal Massie: “The recent racist attacks and mimicry of Condoleezza Rice are infuriating and despicable. Even more insufferable is the deafening silence of the elite liberals. I believe their silence is proof positive of their personal racist attitudes. Obviously condemning racist attacks against a man and woman who are conservative and black is not a worthy undertaking for them.”

Racism is racism regardless of the political orientation of those involved: one does not somehow “deserve racism” by choosing to be a conservative, does one? Are black Republicans less “black” than their Democratic counterparts? If so, why? If not, why the deafening silence from the civil rights establishment?

About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: [email protected], Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.

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