Saturday , September 19 2020

Bush Wins, Barely – Edwards 2008?

Okay, so Bush wins. What should have been a cakewalk — a sitting president mid-war — was very close because no weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq, because the insurgency has been more potent than we had hoped, because the administration didn’t plan very well for the “peace” there, because Bush did quite poorly in the debates, because Kerry proved more tenacious and appealing than most expected, because the get out the youth vote — though still the same 17% as 2000, was certainly a “success” because turnout across the board was massive — heavily favored Kerry, and because the cumulative effect of the press, in particular print, heavily favored Kerry and the cry of “failed presidency” rang out from so many pens. But he, Bush, won nonetheless.

I voted for Bush for reasons stated here, but I have all kinds of reservations about another Bush presidency — the Supreme Court, environment, erosion of the separation of church and state, civil rights, ie, virtually his entire crappy social agenda — and assuming some measure of success in the war on terror, I could very well return to the Democratic fold in four years.

How might that be accomplished, given the clear conservative social agenda of much of the nation as expressed by the citation of “moral values” as the primary issue of so many voters?

William Saletan has some keen observations in Slate:

    I think this is the answer: Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity.

    Bush is a very simple man. You may think that makes him a bad president, as I do, but lots of people don’t—and there are more of them than there are of us. If you don’t believe me, take a look at those numbers on your TV screen.

    Think about the simplicity of everything Bush says and does. He gives the same speech every time. His sentences are short and clear. “Government must do a few things and do them well,” he says. True to his word, he has spent his political capital on a few big ideas: tax cuts, terrorism, Iraq. Even his electoral strategy tonight was powerfully simple: Win Florida, win Ohio, and nothing else matters. All those lesser states—Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, New Hampshire—don’t matter if Bush reels in the big ones.

    This is what so many people like about Bush’s approach to terrorism. They forgive his marginal and not-so-marginal screw-ups, because they can see that fundamentally, he “gets it.” They forgive his mismanagement of Iraq, because they see that his heart and will are in the right place. And while they may be unhappy about their economic circumstances, they don’t hold that against him. What you and I see as unreflectiveness, they see as transparency. They trust him.

    Now look at your candidate, John Kerry. What quality has he most lacked? Not courage—he proved that in Vietnam. Not will—he proved that in Iowa. Not brains—he proved that in the debates. What Kerry lacked was simplicity. Bush had one message; Kerry had dozens. Bush had one issue; Kerry had scores. Bush ended his sentences when you expected him to say more; Kerry went on and on, adding one prepositional phrase after another, until nobody could remember what he was talking about. Now Bush has two big states that mean everything, and Kerry has a bunch of little ones that add up to nothing.

    If you’re a Democrat, here’s my advice. Do what the Republicans did in 1998. Get simple. Find a compelling salesman and get him ready to run for president in 2008. Put aside your quibbles about preparation, stature, expertise, nuance, and all that other hyper-sophisticated garbage that caused you to nominate Kerry. You already have legions of people with preparation, stature, expertise, and nuance ready to staff the executive branch of the federal government. You don’t need one of them to be president. You just need somebody to win the White House and appoint them to his administration. And that will require all the simplicity, salesmanship, and easygoing humanity they don’t have.

    The good news is, that person is already available. His name is John Edwards. If you have any doubt about his electability, just read the exit polls from the 2004 Democratic primaries. If you don’t think he’s ready to be president—if you don’t think he has the right credentials, the right gravitas, the right subtlety of thought—ask yourself whether these are the same things you find wanting in George W. Bush. Because evidently a majority of the voting population of the United States doesn’t share your concern. They seem to be attracted to a candidate with a simple message, a clear focus, and a human touch. You might want to consider their views, since they’re the ones who will decide whether you’re sitting here again four years from now, wondering what went wrong.

    ….Give Edwards a job that will position him to run for president again in a couple of years. Clear the field of Hillary Clinton and any other well-meaning liberal who can’t connect with people outside those islands of blue on your electoral map. Because you’re going to get a simple president again next time, whether you like it or not. The only question is whether that president will be from your party or the other one.

If Edwards dumps the protectionist crap, he doesn’t look all that bad to me four years from now – I will not go for another hard core social conservative.

About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: [email protected], Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.

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