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Home / Books / Book Reviews / Book Review: ‘The Rabbit Who Wants to Go To Harvard’ A Parody by Zeldar the Great With Help From Diana Holquist and Christopher Eliopoulos
"The Rabbit Who Wants to Go To Harvard" by Zeldar The Great with help from Diana Holquist and Christopher Eliopoulos is interactive and witty. While the work is fun and zany, almost more for an adult reader, the way it is written is fun for a child.

Book Review: ‘The Rabbit Who Wants to Go To Harvard’ A Parody by Zeldar the Great With Help From Diana Holquist and Christopher Eliopoulos

9780399539282The Rabbit Who Wants to go To Harvard by Zeldar The Great With Help From Diana Holquist and Christopher Eliopoulos is a fun poke at the concentrated effort some families use on children to overachieve at a young age, when friends and fun should be more important.

Interactive and witty, the work is fun and zany, almost more for an adult reader, although the way it is written is fun for a child. Leaving blanks to fill in the child’s name is one way it works to involve younger readers. Anyway, who couldn’t love the bunny family. However there is certainly enough humor to entertain an adult as well.

Ronald Rabbit wants to be normal, but he can’t. His mom wont let him. She harbors an obsession with Harvard. While she’s pushing him in every direction she works her way through her own issues. The rest of Ronald’s siblings seem to be overlooked in this strange yet fascinating dive into his mom’s obsessive and compulsive push for achievement. But he won’t let her down, even if it means giving up his own fascination with Peter Rabbit, after all his mother assures him that Peter will never go to Harvard with his background.

The Rabbit family is somewhat dysfunctional, but there is a strong push for the little rabbit to begin preparing himself for greater achievement while mom does her own form of encouragement. If you are looking for a book that is fun to read and can challenge your youngster, this may be the very one. By involving them with the use of their name and with all the various ways of encouraging the adult to follow the vocal cues required this is a great book for a parent to read with their child.

This would be an interesting book for a reading group, one full off fun and discussion, especially about obsessions and how they affect others.

About Leslie Wright

Leslie Wright is an author and blogger in the Northwest.

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