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Carole Di Tosti

Carole Di Tosti, Ph.D. is a published writer, novelist and poet. She authors three blogs: The Fat and the Skinny, All Along the NYC Skyline, A Christian Apologists' Sonnets. She contributed articles for Technorati on various trending topics. She guest writes for other blogs. She covers NYC trending events and writes articles promoting advocacy. She was a former English Instructor. Her published dissertation is referenced in three books, two by Margo Ely.

New York Film Festival (Revival): ‘The Color of Pomegranates’

'The Color of Pomegranates' by Sergei Parajanov, is a masterwork by a director of genius who was blacklisted and then served 5 years in a Soviet Gulag in 1973. His films ran contrary to Soviet standards. Parajanov's innovations stand today as a hallmark of vision and experimentation. A maverick ahead of his time, Parajanov's minimalism created visual poetry that was and still is unique to the craft of cinema.

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New York Film Festival: Ethan Hawke’s ‘Seymour, An Introduction’

In 'Seymour, An Introduction' Ethan Hawke shows his chops as a first time documentary filmmaker using a surprising subject in a unique and intuitive process. The film is excellent for what and how it reveals a real and human portrait of friend and mentor of Hawke, former concert pianist, teacher, and composer, the incomparable Seymour Bernstein.

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New York Film Festival: ‘La Sapienza’

How does one break through the emptiness of a life and relationship that has lost meaning? How long must one have to experience the void before there is movement and growth? Sometimes change can happen in the "twinkling of an eye" when one least expects it. It is then that "sapience," wisdom opens the doors of one's heart to receive renewal and forward movement. Such is the experience of Alexandre and Aliénor in 'La Sapienza.'

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Theater Review (NYC): ‘Bauer’ by Lauren Gunderson

Rudolph Bauer's work was not shown for many years where it should have been shown, in the Guggenheim Museum. How was this modernist painter and influential Abstract Expressionist overlooked and silenced? The mystery is revealed in Lauren Gunderson's fine play in which she re-imagines Hilla von Rebay visiting with her lover Bauer long after his marriage to his maid Louise and von Rebay's release from the Guggenheim Museum project.

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