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Woody Allen – Should We Judge Art by the Artist’s Personal Life?

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Dylan and Mia Farrow

I want to start by saying that I am a father and have a daughter; I find the accusations against legendary film director Woody Allen by his adopted daughter Dylan Farrow quite disturbing. In Ms. Farrow’s letter published in The New York Times, the young woman goes into gruesome details about the alleged abuse. Most everyone will find the letter’s contents upsetting; however, we must also state that Mr. Allen has long denied the claims of this abuse, and he has never been charged in regards to this situation.

You can read a good deal more about the case’s details and why the prosecutors in Connecticut did not bring charges against Mr. Allen, but there remains the element of doubt, yet we also must recognize that we need to use “alleged” here because nothing has been proven.

Which gets us to the matter of art and the artist. As long as I can remember, there has been a debate about whether we should judge a work of art by the artist who created it. For example, if William Shakespeare had been a convicted murderer, would that detract from his body of work? Should it matter to us at all what happens in an artist’s personal life? Does not the work in and of itself exist and therefore should please or displease us based on its own merits?

This reminds me of the movie star Rock Hudson. My mother loved Rock and was a great fan. She enjoyed all his movies, and when he started appearing on the TV series Dynasty she was thrilled, though she noted he looked “very thin and like he is not well.” We know now that Mr. Hudson had the AIDS virus, which he died from in 1985. When stories were published afterwards, it was claimed that he was gay and the star machine that operated in Hollywood conspired to keep that information from the public. I will never forget that Mom said, “I don’t care what they say; I still love his movies.”

I bring up this case because Mom was not judging Rock by anything he did behind closed doors. All that was important to her was the work Rock did, and that endured for her even after she learned the truth about him. In her mind the “work” mattered much more than the real life the actor lived when not on screen.

In Mr. Allen’s case, what has caused all this to surface again since the event of alleged molestation occurred over 20 years ago? The answer is Mr. Allen’s lifetime achievement honor at this year’s Golden Globes, and there is also the matter of Cate Blanchett and Sally Hawkins, two actresses in his latest film Blue Jasmine, being nominated for an Academy Awards in the Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress categories and Mr. Allen for Best Screenplay. Since Mr. Allen is in the news once again, does that make him fair game for renewed accusations, and you may ask why hasn’t this happened sooner?

Mr. Allen has worked steadily since he and Mia Farrow broke up in 1992 due to her discovery of a romantic relationship with her adopted daughter Soon Yi Previn, who was 19 at the time. Shortly after this the accusations about Allen’s abuse of Dylan surfaced. We could question why Ms. Farrow has waited until now or why her mother did not press the issue continuously over the years. Of course, child abuse is such a horrendous matter, and also something a family may choose to keep private in respect to the child. We could imagine that Ms. Farrow (now 27 and married) found the courage to speak out when she saw Mr. Allen receiving accolades, and I respect her right to express herself and her outrage.

Still, I recently saw Blue Jasmine and it is an amazing film, mostly because of the performances by its nominated stars. Blanchett is so transparent, so totally believable in the role of a lifetime. Playing the disgraced wife of a former big Wall Street Bernie Madoff type (Alec Baldwin), Ms. Blanchett allows every emotion to register on screen as she slowly comes to grips with her dismantled former life of wealth and privilege. Moving in with her down and out sister (the equally amazing Hawkins) in San Francisco, she tries to reconstruct her life with less than satisfactory results.

About Victor Lana

Victor Lana has published numerous stories, articles, and poems in literary magazines and online. His books In a Dark Time (1994), A Death in Prague (2002), Move (2003), The Savage Quiet September Sun: A Collection of 9/11 Stories (2005) and Like a Passing Shadow (2009) are available online and as e-books. He has won the National Arts Club Award for Poetry, but has concentrated mostly on fiction and non-fiction prose in recent years. He has worked as faculty advisor to school literary magazines and enjoys the creative process as a writer, editor, and collaborator. He has been with Blogcritics since July 2005, has edited many articles, was co-head sports editor with Charley Doherty, and now is a Culture and Society editor. He views Blogcritics as one of most exciting, fresh, and meaningful opportunities in his writing life.
  • bliffle

    You do a disservice to Woody Allen and the reading public by assuming (seemingly) that the charges are valid. There are any number of people who could tell you of false charges against them by manipulators that are almost impossible to discharge. Especially from children. Sometimes such false charges are to gain a propaganda advantage against someone that the manipulator has wronged. I can’t believe that any grownup has not experienced that kind of setup. You’ve got to look at the evidence, not make assumptions.

  • templestark

    The Daily Beast article on this subject is instructive as well. some facts that make you wonder. Mia Farrow is friends with Roman Polanski for one – she seems very selective in her outrage. It’s a deeply complex family on both sides.

  • Victor Lana

    The difficulty of this case is time and space between then and now. Dylan writes from memory, and Bliffle mentions what Allen’s supporters have noted that the child could have had a story planted. Perhaps over time and with much repitition, this could be a story that becomes real to the person. If you read Dylan’s letter, the details are the devil to be sure. It is so vivid and personal it is very easy to be drawn in and sympathetic to the writer.

    As I have done even more research since writing the above piece, I came across an interview on 60 Minutes that is fascinating and captures Woody’s thoughts much closer to the event. Anyone who is accusing him of something should watch this video to have a better understanding of Mr. Allen.

    Whatever happened back then is really not the point of what I have written. I was thinking about his work, his many wonderful films. There are no answers for me and I pose none in this case, but I do wonder about art and people’s need to connect the artist’s personal life to it. The speaker of Shakespeare’s Sonnets is not necessarily Shakespeare. Hemingway’s Nick Adams or Jacob Barnes are not him. Most readers do not get this even part of the time.

    I can only compare it to being in a play. I played an evil prison guard who stole the prisoners things from visitors. I beat a prisoner in the play. After the show outside the theatre people were screaming at me as I left. In their minds I was the prison guard, not the actor playing him. This is some of what the issue is here.

    The problem too is that of association. Alec Baldwin, who starred in Blue Jasmine rightly expressed outrage when someone on Twitter said that he should apologize to Dylan (for being in Allen’s film). Mr. Baldwin was an actor in Allen’s project and has nothing to do with what happened 22 years ago. Why would anyone think he, Cate Blanchett, or any other actor or actress that appeared in Allen’s films have any responsibility (or culpability) for the alleged action?

    The discourse about this will continue for as long as Woody and Mia live, and perhaps even after both are gone. I neither condemn nor absolve Mr. Allen of anything in the above article. I merely mention that his work can and should be appreciated, for it is a significant and memorable part of film history.

  • bliffle

    I’m not a fan of Woody Allen, and I don’t care much about high-falutin’ talk of ‘art’. It matters not to me what Allens fortunes are or what develops from this. But I DO have a considerable experience dealing with determined liars and I will tell you that they ALWAYS have terrific stories to tell, just loaded with details. They get better and better with time, too!

    Most ordinary people are very poor judges of truth. Many psychological studies of this have been done. Ordinary people think there are cues and behaviours that will help them identify truth vs. falsehood, and that’s why so many innocent people are sent to prison and death falsely by sincere prosecutors and juries. Perhaps the husband giggled when told of his wifes gruesome murder. Such Inappropriate Affect (the result of hysteria) is responsible for many false convictions.

    There are many of those pathological liars walking around in society and they are very dangerous. Maybe there are even more liars than pedarists. Maybe they do even more damage, too.

  • bliffle

    Here’s a contrary opinion from Moses Farrow:

    http://www.cnn.com/2014/02/04/showbiz/woody-allen-dylan-farrow-letter/

    Moses Farrow said it never happened. “Of course Woody did not molest my sister,” he told the magazine, which said he is estranged from Mia Farrow and close to Allen. “She loved him and looked forward to seeing him when he would visit. She never hid from him until our mother succeeded in creating the atmosphere of fear and hate towards him. The day in question, there were six or seven of us in the house. We were all in public rooms and no one, not my father or sister, was off in any private spaces. My mother was conveniently out shopping. I don’t know if my sister really believes she was molested or is trying to please her mother. Pleasing my mother was very powerful motivation because to be on her wrong side was horrible.”

  • bliffle

    IMO all the happy hoohah about art is immaterial. What counts is the facts, and we can start by creating a baseline of facts. According to Robert Weide who did a documentary on Allen:

    “Following are the top ten misconceptions, followed by my response in italics:

    #1: Soon-Yi was Woody’s daughter. False.

    #2: Soon-Yi was Woody’s step-daughter. False.

    #3: Soon-Yi was Woody and Mia’s adopted daughter. False. Soon-Yi was the adopted daughter of Mia Farrow and André Previn. Her full name was Soon-Yi Farrow Previn.

    #4: Woody and Mia were married. False.

    #5: Woody and Mia lived together. False.
    Woody lived in his apartment on Fifth Ave. Mia and her kids lived on
    Central Park West. In fact, Woody never once stayed over night at Mia’s apartment in 12 years.

    #6: Woody and Mia had a common-law marriage. False. New York
    State does not recognize common law marriage. Even in states that do, a couple has to cohabitate for a certain number of years.

    #7: Soon-Yi viewed Woody as a father figure. False. Soon-Yi saw Woody as her mother’s boyfriend. Her father figure was her adoptive father, André Previn.

    #8: Soon-Yi was underage when she and Woody started having relations. False. She was either 19 or 21. (Her year of birth in Korea was undocumented, but believed to be either 1970 or ’72.)

    #9: Soon-Yi was borderline retarded. Ha! She’s smart as a whip, has a degree from Columbia University and speaks more languages than you.

    #10: Woody was grooming Soon-Yi from an early age to be his child bride. Oh, come on! According to court documents and Mia’s own memoir, until 1990 (when Soon-Yi was 18 or 20), Woody “had little to do with any of the Previn children, (but) had the least to do with Soon-Yi” so Mia encouraged him to spend more time with her. Woody started taking her to basketball games, and the rest is tabloid history. So he hardly “had his eye on her” from the time she was a child.”

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/01/27/the-woody-allen-allegations-not-so-fast.html

  • Victor Lana

    To continue the discussion seems like being caught between Scylla and Charybdis. We now have been subjected to Mr. Allen’s lengthy letter in the New York Times in which he not only responds to but breaks down the accusatins from adopted daughter Dylan’s previous letter in the publication. He says at the end that this will be the last we hear from him on the subject.

    However, Dylan shoots right back a rebuttal in The Daily Beast.

    This ping-pong match of “he said, she said” could go on indefinitely, unless Mr. Allen keeps his word. As it is there is less clarity for all concerned, and victims of child abuse must be as equally shaken by this as those people who have ever been falsely accused.

    To quote Charles Dickens from Hard Times (how apropos that title seems here) , “”Tis a muddle” and then some.