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Who’s “Stuck on Stupid”? Lt. Gen. Russel Honore’s Phony Candor

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Wednesday night I saw U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Fox News telling reporters — and one reporter in particular — that they were “stuck on stupid” and fighting “the last hurricane,” for asking him why he would want to use the New Orleans Convention Center as a gathering point for people escaping Hurricane Rita, after all of the problems that had arisen there following Hurricane Katrina.

Now, a lot of Republicans surely got their jollies seeing a military man tell off leftwing reporters; I didn’t. It’s no accident that Gen. Honore is black; if a white general spoke that way to reporters, he’d have to publicly apologize for it, or put in his retirement papers. And Gen. Honore has a lot to answer for, regarding the hell that broke loose in the Convention Center and the “Terrordome.”

The National Guard troops who were at those sites, but who refused to restore order, were under Gen. Honore’s command. Lt. Gen. Russel Honore’s hands are covered in blood, and all the bluster and insults in the world won’t wash that blood away.

The same September 3, a CNN article that reported that Gen. Honore had “[made] it clear that it was a humanitarian relief operation,” as opposed to an operation restoring order, quoted New Orleans’ black Democrat Mayor Ray Nagin calling the general a “John Wayne dude.”

Unfortunately, John Wayne was an actor, not a general. Gen. Honore has also been compared to Gen. George Patton Jr., America’s greatest field commander in World War II’s European Theater of Operations. Patton’s Third Army steamrolled the Wehrmacht in France in the summer of 1944. About the only thing that Honore has in common with Patton is his distaste for reporters, and that merely puts him in the company of every other American general since the Civil War.

Patton really was a general; he didn’t just play one. Can you imagine Patton showing up somewhere in battle fatigues, announcing: “This is a humanitarian relief operation”?

If New Orleans was a “humanitarian relief operation,” why were soldiers marching around in uniform with rifles, and authorities claiming that the soldiers were restoring order? Last I heard, you couldn’t drink a rifle butt. And why were armed soldiers under Gen. Honore’s command permitting thugs to hit them over the head with blunt objects and to shoot them, and rather than kill their attackers, running away?

You do not deploy soldiers on humanitarian relief operations, and you do not put soldiers in harm’s way, while ordering them not to defend themselves.

I realize that such deployments are becoming the rule. Hell, even when we go to war now, we feel the need to call it a god-damned “humanitarian relief operation.” Yet such perversions of the military’s function cause nothing but grief. Had a Guardsman shot and killed one of the attacking thugs – assuming he had even been issued live ammunition — presumably he would have been court-martialed for disobeying orders. But that would have opened up quite a can of worms. Since Kent State, the demonization of National Guard troops has been a media ritual. But for a commanding officer to put Guard troops in harm’s way and command them not to defend themselves, could be grounds for his being court-martialed, not to mention his being the defendant in a multimillion-dollar lawsuit.

As CNN reported on September 3,


Hundreds of National Guard and active duty troops are carrying weapons in the city. But the way they carried those guns was a concern to the general.

He ordered all he encountered to point their weapons down, said CNN Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr, who was with the general. Honore repeatedly went up to military vehicles, National Guardsmen standing sentry and even to New Orleans police officers, telling them to please point their weapons down and reminding them that they were not in Iraq.

Which was it — did he order them or ask them, “pretty please”? By the way, in news footage, I see our troops in Iraq pointing their weapons down all the time.

(Ten years ago, when I was researching my first major article on crime, I came across a police blotter entry in a Brooklyn community newspaper about a mugging. The entry said that the mugger had “requested” that the victim hand over his money. I thought to myself: That’s not a mugging. If someone asks you for your money and you give it to him, that’s voluntary.

Only much later, did I realize that the reporter or editor had misrepresented what had transpired. Muggers don’t say, “Please give me your money.” They say things like, “Gimme your s—t!” as a would-be robber said to me one night in early 1992 on a deserted subway platform in Brooklyn, as he reached into his jacket for his weapon. As I immediately threw my newspaper in the air and ran away, shouting “Help!,” I never saw the weapon.

The contemporary media are anti-democratic and authoritarian to the bone, and yet they insist on misrepresenting authority relations, whether legal or illegal. Thus, they report an order as a “request,” be it from a mugger or a general, and refer to a businessman’s employees as his “co-workers.”)

Given that, for better or worse, New Orleans was not under martial law, what was Gen. Honore doing, ordering around police officers? The same geniuses who have criticized me, claiming falsely that posse comitatus precludes using state National Guard troops to restore order, have no problem with a military man bossing around – read making mischief with — civilian law enforcement. (My critics are blissfully unaware that posse comitatus applies only to federal troops. They also see no problem with armed Guardspersons marching around and imitating soldiers in the Terrordome and Convention Center, and on the streets of New Orleans. Some have defended the Guard’s refusal to do its job, claiming “they were outnumbered.” But it is a given that the Guard will be outnumbered; one of its jobs is to restore order against much larger mobs. Based on the “they were outnumbered” rationale, how many National Guard troops should have been dispatched to Los Angeles in 1992 — 100,000? 1,000,000? To ask the question is to see the absurdity of the “they were outnumbered” talking point.)

And that restraint and show of “respect” really impressed New Orleans’ looters and shooters and rapists and carjackers and murderers.

At the time, Gen. Honore did a photo op, helping out an exhausted mom who had been carrying two baby twins through the streets of New Orleans. He didn’t call the reporters who indulged him with that propaganda op “stuck on stupid.” He enjoyed being presented as a hero, without having done anything heroic. And now he’s mad, because reporters are no longer sticking to the “John Wayne dude” script. Live by propaganda, die by propaganda.

The good general needs to do his job, which includes imposing order, protecting and respecting the troops under his command, and leaving civilian personnel alone, rather than trying to intimidate reporters for noting his failure to get the job done last time.
Ed/Pub:NB

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About Nicholas Stix

  • http://cranialcavity.net/wordpress/index.php marc

    As the good Lt. Gen. Russel Honore said, your stuck on stupid.

  • http://musical-guru.blogspot.com Michael J. West

    Marc, given the number of completely reasonable points presented in this article that you completely ignore, I can only assume that you have no argument for them and just repeating “stuck on stupid” is the best you can do.

  • http://mindblender1618.blogspot.com/ JELIEL

    Yeah Comment 1 really showed us the truth…

  • Taloran

    My impressions of Gen. Honore are quite different from yours. Maybe I got the news reports wrong in the aftermath of Katrina – there was a huge, confusing whirlwind of images, voices, and conflicting information coming out of my television set that first week. But it seemed to me that the relief forces were hamstrung and milling around without direction while Harry Connick Jr. and television reporters were able to get to the starving and thirsty people at the convention center, until Gen. Honore arrived on the scene.

    It seemed that Gen. Honore took over, and that within a few hours thereafter the trucks started rolling in with food, water and medical supplies for the people who were stuck there. I was under the impression that he had not previously been on the scene until that day (was it Friday?), and that when he got there, things started flowing more smoothly.

    I’ve been pretty anti-military most of my adult life, but Gen. Honore struck me as very sharp, no-nonsense, and totally in charge of the operation. Once he arrived on the ground in New Orleans, the previously desperate situation at the convention center was relieved in short order, and the looting and mayhem that had been going on thoughout the city quieted down rapidly. I was under the impression that Gen. Honore was one of the few bright spots in a sea of high-level incompetence in the aftermath of Katrina.

    It also seemed to me that his “stuck on stupid” comments to the reporters the other day were pretty much on target – they were worried about Katrina, and he wanted them to shift gears to Rita.

  • Craig Alan

    It’s about time someone stands up to reporters and tell them the truth. Most reporters are “stuck on stupid”. They don’t report, they push their agenda.

    One quick example: The reporters had a field day trying to push the blame on Bush and not on Nagin and Blanco. I’m not a reporter, but in less that 5 minutes searching the internet, I found the entire offical evacation plan for the State of Louisiana and The City of New Orleans. In reading these plans, the state and city DIDN’T DO ANY OF IT. None …

    Why haven’t any of the main steam liberal medial brought these. Why hanven’t CNN and CBS show these.

    I rest my case.

    The General is right, the media is “stuck on stupid”.

    Craig

  • Mark

    Uh, no.

    The National Guard was never under the command of General Honore. They were activated under their respective state governor’s authority, and therefore were under the command of their state governors through their respective Adjutents General.

    Secondly, if you believe the National Guard could have prevented the problems at the convention center and the Superdome, then you admit the National Guard, (and therefore the federal response) were there very quickly.

    You cannot believe the federal response was late, but also believe they were in time to respond to problems at the Superdome.

    The Superdome evacuation began Wednesday 31 August two days after Katrina’s landfall in New Orleans on 29 August.

    You are definately stuck on stupid.

  • Don

    Your reciting of the “facts” are not accurate. As another poster has mentioned, Lt. Gen. Lt. Honore was not in command of the NG troops. There was some discussion of swearing him into the LA Nat. Guard to give him that authority, but the state government balked at that idea. They didn’t (and don’t) know how to use the power available to them and refused to give it to someone who did.

    Lt. Gen. Russel Honore is the one bright spot in this whole affair. Nagin, Blanco & company are inept at best and criminally negligent at best.

    You are definitely “stuck on stupid” in your assessment.

  • http://www.geocities.com/nstix/ Nicholas

    Comment 1 posted by marc on September 23, 2005 09:39 AM:

    As the good Lt. Gen. Russel Honore said, your stuck on stupid.

    It’s bad enough that you can only echo another man’s insult, but you mispelled his insult. A good life project for you would be to try and rise to the level of an echo, by the time you die. I’m afraid that becoming a rational, unique human being is not an option for you.

  • http://geocities.com/nstix Nicholas

    Comment 6 posted by Mark on September 26, 2005 09:52 PM:

    Secondly, if you believe the National Guard could have prevented the problems at the convention center and the Superdome, then you admit the National Guard, (and therefore the federal response) were there very quickly….

    You are definately stuck on stupid.

    Another courageous wannabe echo who can’t even properly cut and paste insults. Why do the logically and honesty-challenged always insert a dramatic “therefore,” where there is no logical connection? Oh, yeah, because they’re full of crap, and want to distract people from that fact.

    The Guard is state, not federal. There is no logical problem with my believing that the state response was in time to restore order, and that as head of the Joint Task Force, Gen. Honore bears responsbility for their failure to restore order.

    Therefore, there’s no “therefore” there.

  • Mike Eller

    Seems that all we want to do is point fingers when we have no idea of the complex situation this area is going through. Everyone wants to be Monday morning quarterbacks but lack the real information that is out there. Before long, everyone will be “stuck on stupid” because that’s what the media wants to do to the American people!

  • Jim

    >>>>> Well, now, there are a lot of problems with this line of thought.

    Wednesday night I saw U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Fox News telling reporters — and one reporter in particular — that they were “stuck on stupid” and fighting “the last hurricane,” for asking him why he would want to use the New Orleans Convention Center as a gathering point for people escaping Hurricane Rita, after all of the problems that had arisen there following Hurricane Katrina.

    >>>>> And he was right. The convention centre was the right place; it was part of the plan for Katrina. The fact that someone else messed up the execution last time is no reason for him to mess up the plan this time.

    Now, a lot of Republicans surely got their jollies seeing a military man tell off leftwing reporters; I didn’t. It’s no accident that Gen. Honore is black; if a white general spoke that way to reporters, he’d have to publicly apologize for it, or put in his retirement papers. And Gen. Honore has a lot to answer for, regarding the hell that broke loose in the Convention Center and the “Terrordome.”

    >>>>> I’d rather not speculate on what gives Republicans (or anyone else) their jollies. I’m not a but sure that the comments on race are appropriate. Certainly caucasian generals have had well-earned reputations for frankness. Schwartzkopf comes to mind.

    >>>>> I’m not sure how General Honore can be held responsible for the mess he found when he arrived. It’s fairly fundamental to the concept of democracy that the army does not leave barracks without specific orders to do so. It would appear that the mess was well advanced before 1st Army was called in.

    The National Guard troops who were at those sites, but who refused to restore order, were under Gen. Honore’s command. Lt. Gen. Russel Honore’s hands are covered in blood, and all the bluster and insults in the world won’t wash that blood away.

    >>>>> Well, now, that’s just flat wrong. As others have pointed out, the National Guard belongs to the state government until the President “nationalises” them. Bush never did. Honore had no authority to give orders to them, any more than he could to FEMA or the Red Cross. I have no doubt that his force of personality could have influenced their actions on occasion. I do not have a real problem with that, as long as he knows what he’s doing. It would seem from the general response that he does.

    The same September 3, a CNN article that reported that Gen. Honore had “[made] it clear that it was a humanitarian relief operation,” as opposed to an operation restoring order, quoted New Orleans’ black Democrat Mayor Ray Nagin calling the general a “John Wayne dude.”

    Unfortunately, John Wayne was an actor, not a general. Gen. Honore has also been compared to Gen. George Patton Jr., America’s greatest field commander in World War II’s European Theater of Operations. Patton’s Third Army steamrolled the Wehrmacht in France in the summer of 1944. About the only thing that Honore has in common with Patton is his distaste for reporters, and that merely puts him in the company of every other American general since the Civil War.

    >>>>> I do not think that Mr. Nagin was referring to occupation or vocation in his comparison. He did seem to be commenting on the force of personality displayed by Honore. There is nothing wrong with that. A larger-than-life persona is not uncommon among operational commanders, be it MacArthur’s “El Supremo” or Slim’s “Uncle Bill.” It can be a very valuable leadership tool, when correctly used.

    >>>>> The comparison to Patton may be appropriate in terms of charisma or personality, but it does not seem terribly apt in terms of talent. Certainly nothing in Honore’s past suggests that his duty has ever taken a back seat to his ego, which was arguably the case on several occasions in Patton’s career.

    Patton really was a general; he didn’t just play one. Can you imagine Patton showing up somewhere in battle fatigues, announcing: “This is a humanitarian relief operation”?

    >>>>> Patton had his difficulties in humanitarian relief situations. Even disregarding the questions about his treatment of German PW’s after the end of hostilities, his tenure as military governor of Bavaria regularly demonstrated that he had a very limited grasp of the requirements of anything other than high-intensity warfare.

    If New Orleans was a “humanitarian relief operation,” why were soldiers marching around in uniform with rifles, and authorities claiming that the soldiers were restoring order? Last I heard, you couldn’t drink a rifle butt.

    >>>>> What the “authorities” claim may often have a tenuous connection with the reality. (Brief pause for a mental review of the first five years of Bush’s administration.) The soldiers were in uniform because that’s what they wear at work. They were carrying weapons because the inconvenience of carrying them when you don’t need them is minimal compared to the inconvenience of needing them when you don’t have them.

    And why were armed soldiers under Gen. Honore’s command permitting thugs to hit them over the head with blunt objects and to shoot them, and rather than kill their attackers, running away?

    >>>>> Reference, please? It’s hard to imagine that this kind of thing would happen without the MSM jumping all over it. I have seen no references to anything like this at all.

    You do not deploy soldiers on humanitarian relief operations, and you do not put soldiers in harm’s way, while ordering them not to defend themselves.

    >>>>> Actually, soldiers are regularly deployed on humanitarian relief around the world, for the same reason that they were deployed in NOLA: They are capable, efficient, organized and able to deal with hardship and surprise without undue difficulty. As someone once said in another context, “When you care enough to send the very best . . .”

    >>>>> There is no evidence, as far as I am aware, that any soldiers failed to defend themselves as needed. I am not aware that self-defence was a problem, for that matter. It would be a brave little looter indeed who would pick a fight with 1st Army.

    I realize that such deployments are becoming the rule. Hell, even when we go to war now, we feel the need to call it a god-damned “humanitarian relief operation.”

    >>>>> I am not aware of any instance in which a war has been called “humanitarian relief.” Of course, over the last thirty years, the nature of armed conflict has changed dramatically, giving rise to situations in which armed conflict and relief operations occur in very close proximity.

    >>>>> The last paragraph makes me wonder whether you have an antipathy to humanitarian actions or whether you simply prefer that they be left in the capable hands of Michael Brown. Neither is very attractive.

    Yet such perversions of the military’s function cause nothing but grief.

    >>>>> Once again, I am not sure that there is any basis for this. Certainly Mr. Nagin does not seem to regret the arrival or Gen Honore. The use of soldiers and sailors in operations ranging from fighting forest fires to managing evacuations is not a new concept. They get called on when the job is too big or too hard or too dangerous for other groups to do.

    Had a Guardsman shot and killed one of the attacking thugs – assuming he had even been issued live ammunition — presumably he would have been court-martialed for disobeying orders. But that would have opened up quite a can of worms. Since Kent State, the demonization of National Guard troops has been a media ritual. But for a commanding officer to put Guard troops in harm’s way and command them not to defend themselves, could be grounds for his being court-martialed, not to mention his being the defendant in a multimillion-dollar lawsuit.

    >>>>> I woud respectfully suggest that none of this has any basis in fact or law. The reference to Kent State in a discussion of self-defence is either seriously mistaken or disingenuous.

    As CNN reported on September 3,

    Hundreds of National Guard and active duty troops are carrying weapons in the city. But the way they carried those guns was a concern to the general.

    He ordered all he encountered to point their weapons down, said CNN Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr, who was with the general. Honore repeatedly went up to military vehicles, National Guardsmen standing sentry and even to New Orleans police officers, telling them to please point their weapons down and reminding them that they were not in Iraq.

    Which was it — did he order them or ask them, “pretty please”? By the way, in news footage, I see our troops in Iraq pointing their weapons down all the time.

    >>>>> Leaving aside the question of whether the reporter understood the difference between an order and a request, the general was right. The last thing that the situation needed was the appearance that the army was edgy or aggressive or feared for their safety. Whether the people he was talking to were subject to his authority or merely impressed by his grasp of the situation, the general was right.

    And that restraint and show of “respect” really impressed New Orleans’ looters and shooters and rapists and carjackers and murderers.

    >>>>> It’s not about respect. It’s about projecting an atmosphere of control, confidence and good will. All three were in short supply. And for every violent criminal in NOLA who needed a “show of force” there were about a thousand citizens who needed the exact opposite.

    At the time, Gen. Honore did a photo op, helping out an exhausted mom who had been carrying two baby twins through the streets of New Orleans. He didn’t call the reporters who indulged him with that propaganda op “stuck on stupid.” He enjoyed being presented as a hero, without having done anything heroic. And now he’s mad, because reporters are no longer sticking to the “John Wayne dude” script. Live by propaganda, die by propaganda.

    >>>>> It’s interesting that you assume that this action was propaganda. Why? Is it because there is no other way to attack an act of kindness than to attack its sincerity? Nothing else that Honore did seems calculated for the benefit of the media. Why conclude that this was? Is it a case of simply refusing to accept that he might have done a good thing?

    The good general needs to do his job, which includes imposing order, protecting and respecting the troops under his command, and leaving civilian personnel alone, rather than trying to intimidate reporters for noting his failure to get the job done last time.

    >>>>> Last I saw, he was doing his job, and doing it well. There was no suggestion in any of the news reports that his troops were in need of protection. The mutual respect between the commander and his people was pretty obvious.

    >>>>> As for the reporter, this is the crux of the matter. Honore had a plan to deal with the second hurricane. The reporter did not seem to understand the plan. This is relevant to Honore because the mass media are ana essential part of the plan. It cannot function unless the popluace is told where to go to get help, food, water, evacuation, etc. If the reporter frames his story (as there will be a great temptation to do) along the lines of “the army’s plan is a disaster,” not only will he have failed in his task to report the facts, but he will dissuade some people from going where help is to be found. That would annoy me about as much as it did the general.

    >>>>> I have a real problem with this post. There is so much hostility and so little basis for it. Is this just attacking a target of opportunity? Is the poster genuinely concerned that humanitarian operations are wrong? Would he prefer that the only effective group in the disaster be confined to attacking and shooting American citizens? Is he upset because he perceives that Gen Honore is getting special consideration because of his race? Does he just like to attack people? What’s the real purpose of the post?

  • pete

    You know I wonder since speaking of general Honore “over” and his ability to command in a way that says i’m here and now it’s going to be done by the book and with ever property of dignity and justice added in that… And my thinkings are wouldn’t it be nice to have a general like this in iraq or in aghganistan….. Wow imagine that…….

  • marcial

    wow bro .. your a fuckin jackass

  • Patrick Simon First Sergeant Retired

    “If he was white” he could not say this???

    Wow I think you are way off base here. General Honore simply said the things that needed to said to motivate the population (entire to include) reporters to desimnate complete and accurate information to help save lives and relive suffering. This is Army Civil affairs and remember we kick other peoples butts, take over the country and run the show. Read your history….

    I said things fare worst than that during the San Francisco 1989 earthquake. I was awaarded for saving a live and I was in the Army as well.

    The General said and did exactly what he has been trained to do and if he did anything less he is robbing the taxpayers. Look at it this way, sometimes you get your money’s worth. In this case you got something extra… in Louisiana we call it “Lanippe” french for something extra.

    Nothing wrong with red pepper…Creoles can say that and i am a proud one too!

  • http://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com Nicholas Stix

    #11 — November 14, 2005 @ 20:53PM — Jim
    Jim: Well, now, there are a lot of problems with this line of thought.

    Stix: And why were armed soldiers under Gen. Honore’s command permitting thugs to hit them over the head with blunt objects and to shoot them, and rather than kill their attackers, running away?

    Jim: Reference, please? It’s hard to imagine that this kind of thing would happen without the MSM jumping all over it. I have seen no references to anything like this at all.

    Stix: You do not deploy soldiers on humanitarian relief operations, and you do not put soldiers in harm’s way, while ordering them not to defend themselves.

    Jim: Actually, soldiers are regularly deployed on humanitarian relief around the world, for the same reason that they were deployed in NOLA: They are capable, efficient, organized and able to deal with hardship and surprise without undue difficulty. As someone once said in another context, “When you care enough to send the very best . . .”

    Jim: There is no evidence, as far as I am aware, that any soldiers failed to defend themselves as needed. I am not aware that self-defence was a problem, for that matter. It would be a brave little looter indeed who would pick a fight with 1st Army.

    I missed “Jim’s” post at the time, and there is so much wrong with it that it would take hours to correct all of his nonsense. I am not going to waste that sort of time on a slob who was either too lazy to do his homework, or who simply lied about matters. But one thing does stand out: His insinuation that I made up a story about an assault on two National Guardsmen. Since I wrote on that story at length, I have done a copy-and-paste from my 9,600-word exposé on the New Orleans Times-Picayune’s late September, 2005 reverse reporting campaign, in which the Times-Pic acted as though it had never reported on the savagery in Katrina’s wake, and as though other media outlets had done such reporting based only on “rumors,” when in fact the Times-Pic had done the most such reporting, and very little of such reporting, by it or anyone else, had been based on “rumors.” The Times-Pic lied, pure and simple. And for its lies, it was rewarded with two Pulitzer Prizes, and I gave it the Duranty-Blair Award.

    Seven at New Orleans Times-Picayune Win Duranty-Blair Award.

    The “Non-Crime” and “Exaggeration” Strategies

    The September 26 team also “disappeared” crime via two other major tactics: Re-defining violent crimes as non-crimes, and through quotes from officials, claiming that the level of violence was greatly “exaggerated.”

    On September 1, the AP’s Adam Nossiter (“Anger and Unrest Mount in Desperate New Orleans,” exists on the Web only in cached form, which may expire at any time, at message boards), reported,
    “A National Guard military policeman was shot in the leg as the two scuffled for the MP’s rifle, police Capt. Ernie Demmo said. The man was arrested.

    “These are good people. These are just scared people,” Demmo said.

    Capt. Demmo’s bizarre rationalization notwithstanding, other initial reports said that the military policeman was accompanied by a female comrade, and that when a man appeared in the dark, and hit each of them over the head with a metal rod, the female comrade, rather than defend her partner, ran away.

    Later, the media, which had since “forgotten” the assaulted and cowardly female “soldier,” identified the assaulted military policeman as Louisiana National Guardsman Chris Watt, of the 527th Engineer Battalion. (Just as racial taboos forbid honest descriptions of black people behaving badly, sexual taboos forbid honest reporting on women who, while working in sexually inappropriate jobs – as police officers, military combat positions, “fire fighters,” etc. – prove themselves physically incompetent or show cowardice under fire.)

    In 9/26, citing Watt’s commander, Thevenot, Russell, Duncan and Filosa told readers that the Guardsman’s wound was “self-inflicted,” because it came from his own rifle.

    But that’s legally (not to mention, morally) irrelevant. If someone assaults a police officer, and the officer draws his weapon to defend himself, and during the struggle, his weapon fires and wounds him, the wound does not count as “self-inflicted,” because it was not accidental or the result of his intention, but rather the direct result of the assault.

    Legally, the same would apply to the case of a National Guardsman keeping order. Thus, assuming the officer (soldier) survives, his attacker will be charged with first degree assault, assault with a deadly weapon, or attempted murder on a police officer (in Watt’s case, simply attempted murder). Thus, to attempt to turn the near murder of a National Guardsman into a “self-inflicted” wound is a case of sophistry in the service of evil. It also tells you what the Duranty-Blair winners think of the Guardsmen who risked their lives to save others during the savagery.

    “Soldier shot – by himself

    “Inside the Dome, where National Guardsmen performed rigorous security checks before allowing anyone inside, only one shooting has been verified. Even that incident, in which Louisiana Guardsman Chris Watt of the 527th Engineer Battalion was injured, has been widely misreported, said Maj. David Baldwin, who led the team of soldiers who arrested a suspect.

    “Watt was attacked inside one of the Dome’s locker rooms, which he entered with another soldier. In the darkness, as he walked through about six inches of water, Watt was attacked with a metal rod, a piece of a cot. But the bullet that penetrated Watt’s leg came from his own gun – he accidentally shot himself in the commotion. The attacker never took his gun from him, Baldwin said. New Orleans police investigated the matter fully and sent the suspect to jail in Breaux Bridge, Baldwin said.

    “As for other shootings, Baldwin said, ‘We actively patrolled 24 hours a day, and nobody heard another shot.'”

    Shame on Maj. Baldwin.

    By the way, outside of science fiction and horror movies, “metal rods” do not attack people; only people and animals attack people. Talk about newspeak!

    One year after Katrina, the Times-Picayune has been publishing its own propagandistic retrospectives, which apparently seek to bury the reader in so much revisionistic disinformation, that he never finds his way back to the truth.

    In an August 30, 2006 revision by 9/26 team member, Jeff Duncan, the assault with the metal rod and the cowardly female comrade have both been sent down the memory hole, and all that is left is a “scuffle” Guardsman Watt had with an assailant, who though arrested, has never been named. One wonders what the civilian could have been charged with: Third-degree scuffling? Being a material witness to a self-inflicted wound?

    If one would do violence to the English language, one must be consistent. Thus, if one would define out of existence a violent crime, one must also define out of existence the ensuing arrest for said crime.

    At least we no longer have to worry about violent, lone metal rods on the prowl.

    Maj. Baldwin notwithstanding, we also know of numerous cases in which people in the Superdome fired on rescue helicopters.

    At the time of the attack on Guardsman Watt and his female comrade, some of their comrades in the 527th complained to Army Times reporter Joseph R. Chenelly.

    An incensed Spc. Philip Baccus said, “I never thought that at [sic] a National Guardsman I would be shot at by other Americans. And I never thought I’d have to carry a rifle when on a hurricane relief mission. This is a disgrace.”

  • http://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com Nicholas Stix

    #14 — April 23, 2008 @ 17:32PM — Patrick Simon First Sergeant Retired

    Simon: “If he was white” he could not say this???

    Stix: No, he couldn’t.

    Simon: Wow I think you are way off base here. General Honore simply said the things that needed to said to motivate the population (entire to include) reporters to desimnate complete and accurate information to help save lives and relive suffering. This is Army Civil affairs and remember we kick other peoples butts, take over the country and run the show. Read your history….

    I said things fare worst than that during the San Francisco 1989 earthquake. I was awaarded for saving a live and I was in the Army as well.

    The General said and did exactly what he has been trained to do and if he did anything less he is robbing the taxpayers. Look at it this way, sometimes you get your money’s worth. In this case you got something extra… in Louisiana we call it “Lanippe” french for something extra.

    Nothing wrong with red pepper…Creoles can say that and i am a proud one too

    Stix: With all due respect for your service, Sergeant, I stand by my column. If anything, I should have put more emphasis on the fact that Gen. Honore was breaking the law in giving orders to non-military law enforcement personnel.

  • K. Kojei

    One of the wonderful things about the Internet version of the free press is that just about anybody can express their opinion about just about anything. Stix, give it up. You blew it on this one. The more you talk, the more experienced people realize you have no clue. Of course those soldiers were commanded to point their guns down. Would you point a gun at your boss? Those were American citizens. Did you forget that? I served with Russell Honore some years back. His candor is not phony. It’s not about race. I know this from personal experience because he relieved my section sergeant of duty while reaming him for not being on point in a matter and put me, a PFC in charge of the matter because he knew I would get the job done. I have the highest regard for the man. There is no duplicity in him. Thank God for that.

  • A soldier

    General Honore first off is not black, he’s creole. Second he is one of the best generals there has been in my time and in my eyes. He speaks the truth no matter what you wanna hear and gets sh*& done. Get over it.

  • http://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com Nicholas Stix

    “17 – K. Kojei

    “Aug 21, 2008 at 11:01 am

    “One of the wonderful things about the Internet version of the free press is that just about anybody can express their opinion about just about anything. Stix, give it up. You blew it on this one. The more you talk, the more experienced people realize you have no clue. Of course those soldiers were commanded to point their guns down. Would you point a gun at your boss?”

    K. Kojei, [Personal attack deleted by Comments Editor] How many lies you told, only you know, but you certainly lied, when you switched the reference to, “Of course those soldiers were commanded to point their guns down.”

    I never criticized Honore for commanding SOLDIERS to point their guns down, idiot! I criticized him for unlawfully ordering civilian law enforcement officers to do so. That you had to tell a bold-faced lie, in order to try and make me look bad, shows you to be a complete fraud. On that basis, all of your other claims, e.g., to have served with Gen. Honore, must also be called into doubt. [Personal attack deleted by Comments Editor]

  • http://nicholasstixuncensored.blogspot.com Nicholas Stix

    @A soldier:

    The media presented him as black, or rather, they simply presented him. They didn’t get into any legalistic distinctions between “black” and “creole,” and over 90% of the American people would have no idea what you’re talking about. After all, they’ve been propagandized for 50 years that the distinction you made does not exist. Do the media refer to “Obama” as a “creole” President? And do you run around lecturing everyone who refers to “Obama” as “black,” that he isn’t?

    Those were rhetorical questions.

    As for the rest of your vacuous post, I just re-read my essay, and found that you addressed nothing in it.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    “Those were rhetorical questions.”

    Good thing considering you apparently don’t know what “creole” means

  • BSBSBSandMoreBS

    Katrina. Next to the bailout, (& Vitenam) it was the biggest government fuck-up in history. I’d like to see somebody address the conspiracy involving the media & government during Katrina. Media falsely claimed that there was murdering, looting, rapes, shooting at rescuers, etc, which gave the government an excuse as to why relief was so slow.