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Whiny Republitards! Just what New Orleans Needs…

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What in the hell does it take? The Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced its plans to use New Orleans as its venue for strategizing, and while they’re at it they plan to take the opportunity to help clean things up a bit, literally. They are gonna put the “suits” on the streets with shovels and trash bags etc., to clean and restore. And all the Republicans can say is:

“I’m not sure what the Democrats hope to gain except cheap political points at the expense of Louisiana and the White House,” said Glen Bolger, a GOP strategist and pollster.

What are they thinking? “The expense of Louisiana”? Like the DNC is going to charge for the cleanup effort? This is a simple and beautiful gesture.

[ADBLOCKHERE]Yes of course politically motivated (they are a political organization, if you did not know), but why are the GOP talking heads calling this an expense? Maybe it weighs in on the debit ledger for them, but Louisiana? I would think that the GOP have the budget and the means to answer this with actions of their own, instead of needless sour grapes. OK, so Bush et al have blown it in the Gulf recovery so bad that a token gesture by a few hundred politicists can rattle their cage? Who is to fault here?

“For the American people, Katrina is one of the biggest symbols that this government doesn’t work for their interests,” said Jenny Backus, a Democratic consultant.

The strategists also said that meeting in New Orleans injects tourist dollars into a fragile economy, sends an important message that the city is open for business and allows the party to identify with part of its base.

Can anyone tell me in an intelligent conversation how several hundred volunteers lending a cleaning hand, spending private funds, and helping to promote the recovery of a badly affected region can be an expense? Please do.

“While President Bush maintains an unwavering commitment to rebuilding the Gulf Coast, Democrats remain just as committed to political posturing for short-term gain,” said Tracey Schmitt, a Republican National Committee spokeswoman.

I don’t know about you, but where I come from, actions speak much louder than words. Just a thought.

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About Paul Jordan Sr

43 comments

  1. This is just more of the typical GOP distort, deny, etc. They got caught with their pants down when the Dems announced something that, had any of the GOP actually been public-service-oriented instead of ME-service-oriented, they themselves should have thought of long ago – but didn’t. Of course they’re whining, carping, & criticizing. What else?

  2. Though you have a good point here, I have to object to using “Republitards” as a term of slander–honestly, I have the same reaction when I see “libtards,” which is disappointment at lack of verbal acuity. We can do better than that.

  3. If the Democrats were truly sincere here they’d be inviting Republicans to join them in the trenches and make it something more than just a partisan photo-op, which is basically what the Republicans are complaining about.

    Dave

  4. Dave: 1. Politicians are sincere? 2. Getting in the trenches and doing something is a photo-op? Must be more of that sophist-icated US politics you’re so fond of!

  5. LOL, Dave, the Repubs don’t need an invitation; that’s just an excuse for why they WON’T join in at getting their precious white hands dirty: can’t possibly work with those damned Dems, after all, and we weren’t invited, blah blah blah. There’s nothing in the world stopping them, if they TRUELY want to help, from pre-empting the Dems & simply going down there & holding a workfest. Nothing. Except, of course, their distaste for actual poor people & real work. Which is why it surprises me that the Dems are doing it. Brilliant PR move, IF they do it & don’t just talk it, but the Dems I’ve seen aren’t any more interested in actually being within a football stadium of an actual working wage earner than the GOPs are, and they’re just as fond of honest labor – not!

  6. I’d have to disagree with the comment in your article from Jenny Backus. She says that katrina is a symbol that gov doesn’t work for us.

    I say it’s a symbol that Ray Nagin is an idiot and that a lot of people in this country just don’t understand who is responsible for what when it comes to government. It’s a symbol that some people are to damned stupid to get out of their home when the water gets up to their necks, that some people are two lazy to fend for themselves and lastly, that some people just believe that the government is supposed to do EVERYTHING for them.

    The one picture I remember more than any other from Katrina…that lot full of buses…must have been a hundred of them…sitting their in the water while Nagin bitched about the federal government not doing anything.

  7. Getting in the trenches and doing something is a photo-op? Must be more of that sophist-icated US politics you’re so fond of!

    Always, Christopher. If you don’t know this you don’t know US politics.

    And another rule is that once the Democrats have initiated something like this the Republicans can’t imitate it or ask to join in because it shows weakness and acknowledges the cleverness of the other party and that’s not politically an option.

    As for actually, truly helping people out, that’s not happening here. This is all symbolic. What real help there is will come from private citizens of both parties pitching in without sending out a press release or holding a press conference.

    Dave

  8. Dave: serious question – are political parties actually bad for politics?

  9. I think the real question is whether political parties are good for the people. They’re clearly good for politics. They are politics. Parties are one of the strange things where they suck, but the more you have of them the less they suck individually.

    Dave

  10. Dave,
    The invitation was sent via “Airmail”, with 150 mile an hour wind velocity, to everyone in the world. Both parties are having these strategy meetings, and both are equally capable of holding them wherever they choose. Of course there is going to be little real cleanup done, point is, the money will flow into the economy, awareness re-kindled, and obviously a flame lit under the GOP in general.
    As for party politics, they are the unquestioned, unbridled scourge of this political system! That sai, they are the core of this political system, and seem to have worked pretty well up to this point. As the sponsoring book from Amazon up top says, ‘people powered politics” is going to be the deciding factor if change is to come.

  11. So… Are political parties bad for we the people? Are they now failing us? If so, what can or ought to be done? What’s the answer?

    Inquiring minds want to know!

  12. The current 2-party system as it stands now in the US is the single biggest detriment to actual competence & fairness in government, and the single biggest threat to it, that has ever existed, IMO. Between the two of them, they have created a lock on politics in this country, period, yet both are opposite sides of the same ugly, self-serving, arrogant, money-grubbing, lying, corrupt coin. We desperately need a 3rd party, or a 4th & 5th. I am SO envious of places like Germany or even England, where even if there are 2 majority parties, they still have other viable parties that keep the big two on their toes & relatively responsive.

  13. Andy Marsh wrote:
    “I say it’s a symbol that Ray Nagin is an idiot and that a lot of people in this country just don’t understand who is responsible for what when it comes to government.”

    Ray Nagin was a fool among many, no doubt, but after all is said and done, the damage is done. The floods came. The levies broke. Our tax dollars were allocated. This administration blew it, dropped the ball, got caught with it’s pants down, and unlike Clinton… they did not even have a cigar!

    Andy also wrote:
    “It’s a symbol that some people are to damned stupid to get out of their home when the water gets up to their necks, that some people are two lazy to fend for themselves and lastly, that some people just believe that the government is supposed to do EVERYTHING for them.”

    Myself, having lost everything I own to Hurricane Charlie, and I mean quite literally everything except my life and family, I find the 2nd part of this statement to both callous and truly ignorant. Andy, not everyone in these glorious United States has a car, cash reserves for an evacuation, or even the where with all to execute any type of plan. That is why they are called the needy. They need us, and we usually respond in kind from the stance of ‘there but for the grace of God go I’. I do not know where you live, but rather than call you out as an arrogant, omnipotent, coldhearted elitist, I will simply say that I truly and sincerely hope that you or yours never have the closest misfortune of experiencing total and complete devastation. Be it from Hurricane, Wild Fire, Flood, or Terrorist attack, I pray that you never come to know 1st hand what I and other victims of Disaster know.

  14. “I’d have to disagree with the comment in your article from Jenny Backus. She says that katrina is a symbol that gov doesn’t work for us.”

    Well of course it works for us, just ask any of those millions who’ve never drawn anything BUT a government paycheck…

  15. Paul, what Andy said may have been callous, but it wasn’t ignorant. The truth is that a great many people were offered the opportunity to evacuate and refused it. Sure, there were also some who lacked the means, but many of them when given the opportunity cooperated with authorities and got out. The fact remains that many others just plain refused to leave.

    As for political parties, the two party system has NOT served us well. It is designed to promote mediocre demagogues to positions of power and discourages diversity of opinion and belief. A 3 or more party system which forced coalition building would be far more productive and positive.

    Dave

  16. Amen to what you just said, Dave. There were too many interviews afterwards featuring idiots admitting that they didn’t think it would be that bad, so they stayed. Not that they couldn’t go; just didn’t ‘think’ they would need to move their lazy butts.

  17. I was one of those people with no place to go and no way to get there. I lost everything in Katrina. Like Andy, I do mean everything except me, my cat, and a small suitcase of essentials. My house was utterly destroyed and I would have been destroyed with it if my neighbors hadn’t decided to take me with them. Bless them, they saved my life.

    In the days preceding Katrina I tried to:

    1. Rent a car, but none were available.
    2. Get a plane ticket out of there, to anywhere, ditto the above.
    3. Get a hotel room so I would be in a sturdier building. Most were booked and those that weren’t were not staying open.

    I was desperate, afraid, and by the time my neighbors got to me, drunk and in tears. I would not go to the shelter at the superdome (and SO glad I didn’t) because pets were not allowed. My cat is my family, and I was not going to leave her behind.

    So you callous bastards who think that remaining in that hell-hole was an easy choice, one made out of laziness, screw you. I’m sick and tired of the criticism of people whose shoes you cannot possibly stand in. In the face of a disaster like that, decisions are not made out of laziness. Such decisions can be heartbreaking. Believe me I know.

  18. Che, not one person here made a qualitative judgement of the people who chose to stay behind. I certainly didn’t address the reasons, just that it was a choice many people ended up making. You sound like you didn’t have a choice, assuming you have no car – which you didn’t say clearly.

    Certainly no one said it was a matter of laziness. I know many stayed behind to protect their property and belongings, and I can’t argue with that as a reason.

    Dave

  19. Certainly no one said it was a matter of laziness.

    except for: Not that they couldn’t go; just didn’t ‘think’ they would need to move their lazy butts.

    not one person here made a qualitative judgement of the people who chose to stay behind

    except for: There were too many interviews afterwards featuring idiots admitting that they didn’t think it would be that bad, so they stayed

    and: It’s a symbol that some people are to damned stupid to get out of their home when the water gets up to their necks, that some people are two lazy to fend for themselves and lastly,

  20. Ok, change everything in my post to ME not other people. I apparently missed the comments of those who said particularly stupid things. Perhaps I have some sort of idiocy filtering wetware installed in my brain.

    Dave

  21. #20 sez…
    *Perhaps I have some sort of idiocy filtering wetware installed in my brain.*

    then how can you read what you type?

    couldn’t resist…

    {8^P~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Excelsior!

  22. truly dave, that was a softball lobbed in gonzo’s direction if there ever was one.

  23. Good lord, gonzo. You think I actually READ what I type?

    Dave

  24. Actually, Nancy said: Not that they couldn’t go; just didn’t ‘think’ they would need to move their lazy butts., which implies people stayed out of laziness.

    If there were people with such attitudes they were very few, and to point them out as representatives of all the people who stayed is doing an injustice to those who hadn’t the means to leave. People weren’t stupid. We knew what was coming. Most people felt like I did, frightened and stranded. And most of those people that remained behind, if given adequate transportation, a place to go, and an option that included their pets, would have gone.

    I wasn’t bitching at you Dave, for a change (hehe).

    And no, I didn’t have a car, which is why I tried to rent one. I had just enough money in my bank accout at the time to get out, if I could only have gotten a way. Screw the bills, they could wait, I wanted out. But I wouldn’t have gotten out if I hadn’t been helped by my neighbors.

    Also, I meant to say like Paul I lost everything, not like Andy.

  25. “I apparently missed the comments of those who said particularly stupid things.”

    Finally, after a year-and-a-half, I agree with something Dave Nalle says…

  26. Wow, take a nap and all hell breaks lose! LOL

    I cannot believe what I am hearing from well educated writers and bloggers who KNOW that the MSM is biased. The main stream guys will show you any “news” which sells airtime. Supposed “majorities” of victims who made a “choice” to stay behind during Katrina, or Charlie in my case, is just plain bull crap.

    We as a World saw maybe a hundred or so interviews of whacked out idiots who stayed behind because they believed they were bullet proof, we all know there were Thousands afflicted, yet we are going to be Lemmings and follow CBS,FOX, etc into believing the tiny percentage as the representing norm?

    Come on folks, I am here to tell you this was no “get rich at the government’s expense” scheme. I miss my stuff. I miss my lifestyle as I am sure Che and others do. To assume what you saw on TV is the truth is an ignorance I did not think I would see here.

    PS
    The statement above by ANDY
    “It’s a symbol that some people are to damned stupid to get out of their home when the water gets up to their necks, that some people are two lazy to fend for themselves and lastly, that some people just believe that the government is supposed to do EVERYTHING for them.

    Is very much a callous and personal affront to anyone involved, not to mention just plain wrong.

  27. Now that I’m feeling calmer (and yes I do sometimes get very emotional talking about Katrina, especially when I see ignorant and vicious comments about the issue) just want to say interesting article Paul and no napping. I’ve only been here a short time with BC but I’ve come to the conclusion that blogcritics never nap. Ever.

  28. Thanks Che, and no, we don’t sleep, hence the napping thing!

    I got this comment from my cross post from ‘Jaime’

    “Being a resident of New Orleans area I tend to wander the Internet looking for “chat” about us. In reference to this story – I am grateful that the DNC is coming to New Orleans – period. They will be staying in our hotels, eating our food and listening to our music. It is a cash injection that is indeed sorely needed. I hope they will also be treated to wide variety of the things that make this place so unique.

    While they are here they will take the opportunity to actually work in a house (which is like straightening up a couple of straws on a haystack but at least it’s a gesture) and take a tour of the rest of the city. GREAT!

    Less than 50% of the lawmakers in Washington have come here or to any of the affected regions at all. Unless you come on down and take a good look you really don’t have a clue as to what things are really like or what we are even talking about.

    A few months ago, while gutting my mothers house (which is still not finished – we are waiting for a fair insurance settlement and can’t lose evidence) I stated that I thought that all members of the senate and the house should be forced to come here for one day. During the morning they would be charged with cleaning out someone’s middle class life and dumping it in the front yard while the resident was present to note items of significance (great-grandmothers tablecloth, children’s hospital coming home outfit, ect…). They would then get a grand lunch (but not a shower) and spend the rest of the afternoon riding around getting a glimpse of just how many other houses are in the same shape.

    What they are planning on doing is kind of like that – good – they need it!”

  29. I do think Jaime highlighted the most important thing. It’s not whatever mostly symbolic lifting and repairing they do that really matters, it’s the hotel rooms they rent and money they spend in restaurants and in stores that will really help out.

    BTW, all sorts of relatively conservative groups have conventions scheduled for New Orleans in the coming year, including the Lions International, the National Association of Realtors, the Public Choice Society, Independent Petroelum Association of America and the one all of your lefties love to hate, the National Defense Industries Association.

    Dave

  30. “…and the one all of your lefties love to hate, the National Defense Industries Association.”
    - Dave Nalle

    There might be a few “righties” who, behind the facade of flag-waving and spouting macho war slogans, also hate national defense, considering their draft-dodging when they had the chance to serve. The list includes the likes of Dick Cheney, Karl Rove, John Ashcroft, Newt Gingrich, Paul Wolfowitz, Bill Bennett, Dick Armey, Phil Gramm, Rush Limbaugh, Bill O’Reilly, Ted Nugent, etc.

    Oh, they SAY they “support” national defense…as long as someone else goes…

  31. Just for the record, since I am new here and not well known by you, I am neither a leftie nor a righty. I was raised “left”, leaned “right”, and landed somewhere in the middle with the vast majority of Americans. I do have a slight list to the left, I will admit, but I fervently believe each and every subject on the political forefront today needs a seperate evaluation and stance.

  32. I’m going to go down this road one last time. MCH, why don’t you tell us why having the wisdom to protest against and avoid serving in a foolish and incompetently run war makes you opposed to national defense in general? You are essentially saying that peoplel who felt in the 1960s and 1970s about Vietnam the same way that you and your cohorts feel about Iraq are criminals for expressing their opposition to the war. Can you honestly say that you would volunteer today to serve in Iraq when you are personally totally opposed to the war? Are you a criminal for not choosing to serve now when so many others with military service backgrounds have been called up, even some who are in their 70s.

    If not, stop being hypocritical and find something constructive to do with your time.

    Dave

  33. I am definately going to have to agree with Dave on this, MCH, you can’t be ‘anti-one-bad-war’, and ‘pro-another-bad-war’. Sometimes a person’s zeal to discredit the perpetrator’s of a perceived evil can lead him into a hypocracy just as bad. As I said in my peice today, “Open Mouth….”, foul politics are just, well, foul!

  34. Nalle, I notice your back to your immature, hateful personal attacks, instead of explaining this:

    “…and the one all of your lefties love to hate, the National Defense Industries Association.”

  35. I’m pretty sure he addressed that.

  36. Here’s an idea, MCH. Rather than calling my straightforward, factual description of your personal hypocrisy an “immature, hateful personal attack”, why don’t you take a moment to explain it?

    As for your repeated question, what is there to answer? Are you claiming that the left wing LIKES the defense industry? Hell, even Ike didn’t like them.

    Dave

  37. I thought this thread was in response to party politics, and New Orleans?

  38. “Paul, what Andy said may have been callous, but it wasn’t ignorant.”

    I disagree, Nalle. I think it was ignorant.

  39. MCH – one of these days you’ll figure out that I’m not a gov employee. I work on gov contracts, but I’m not a gov employee. Just because a draw a check from the gov every month, does not make me a gov employee. I’ve told you enough times, according to you, why I draw a gov check every month.

  40. I never said all people, I said some people…all of you saw the same interviews on TV…those interviews of people that ALWAYS stay when a hurricane hits. They live in FL, LA, AL, MS, and even here in VA. For you people to deny that there aren’t ALWAYS people that tough it out in these storms is straight up BULLSHIT! I’ll bet you can still find big pieces of plywood that say something along the lines of “Bring it on Katrina!” And I bet you can find pieces that have the names of several different storms with the same kind of message.

    Around here when a hurricane threatens the biggest purchase is usually generators and bottled water. Sorry, that’s not a purchase that tells me you’re gonna leave town.

    I do understand that not everyone has transportation, but I also understand that moving them all to one or two buildings to fend for themselves couldn’t have been the brightest idea on the planet either.

    Why was it good for Nagin to move everyone to two locations and then not supply them with even drinking water? How is that the fault of the federal government?

  41. I guess the deal is that the rest of the world is supposed to ignore what we see. OK, I didn’t see any of the stuff that makes me believe that SOME people in this country are down right stupid. I’m sorry if you feel it’s callous to point out stupidity in the world. I’m not politically correct. For some reason it leaves a bad taste in my mouth.

    You think I don’t know that there are people down there hurting. People that couldn’t get out. I saw the stories about the hospital patients left to drown or starve. Those aren’t the people I’m talking about and I’d bet that most of you already knew that! You like to pretend that all your neighbors are as bright as you…go ahead…you pretend that there are no extremely stupid people in the world…look up darwin awards.

    I know ya’ll are hurting down there. You were BEFORE Katrina. Alot of the area was anyway…I used to live down there…I still have friends down there…

    the problem is, I keep reading stories about portable housing being turned down or fighting over where it’s gonna be placed after agreements had been made. It sounds to me like people and gov are trying to help and they’re being faught!

    And what made me comment on this in the first place was the statement that said that Katrina was a symbol that gov doesn’t work for us.

    Sorry…not to me.

  42. Che – re #17, thanks for writing that, I believe as well that people do make assumptions based upon the images shown on TV–which were, naturally, the most sensational available.

    Andy, you do write in #6 using qualifiers like “Some,” and I have to agree with you to a point. Many–not nearly all, however–of the victims did actively make the choice to stay, and I suspect at least a third of those thought that since they’d been through so many “false alarms” before, this would be no different. I grew up in NOLA, and must have evacuated 7 or 8 times in my childhood with nothing happening. But after awhile, people start to think of it as “crying wolf,” and that it might not be worthwhile to leave.

    This doesn’t justify the action, of course, but it helps explain it. Others, like Che, tried to escape but weren’t able to. Due to the extreme poverty, I suspect there are many more like her. But I bet if you surveyed all those people before Katrina, not a one would have stayed had they recognized that the levees built to protect them (and reinforced after Betsy) could give way again.

    People who have been in a neighborhood for generations, protected by a levee for 40 or 50 years, are going to have a hard time *taking action* as if the levee isn’t there–and as if they hadn’t evacuated before for something that didn’t happen. That’s almost like me leaving my house and looking for shelter in the next thunderstorm because my roof “could” collapse, though it’s a perfectly stable house.

    In an area such as this, protected by (9/5/05; PDF warning) “the Lake
    Pontchartrain and Vicinity Project being constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of
    Engineers and maintained by local levee districts,” people assume that since the Federal government had taken responsibility, that the project was well built. Faulty assumption.

    But it’s part of an implied social contract, and expecting a population which might be among the least educated to understand that concept alone, much less the ways in which it is not accurate, is asking alot. Meanwhile, you have a government being run by people who do not *like* government, which to me leads to people not caring terribly much about doing it well. Put both pieces together, and you’ve got a catastrophe.

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