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Two More Examples of Congressional Insanity

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Congress must be stopped! The evidence keeps coming in and can no longer be ignored. Congress poses a greater threat to this nation than all the terrorists or rogue nations in the world. In a word, their behavior can only be described as insane.

Remember the hodge-podge mess that was the immigration bill? Well, now that it's failed, the issue is back in the hands of the House of Representatives, and they've decided to get their revenge for the defeat of the earlier version by putting together a new version which takes out the few, small positive aspects of the old bill and instead puts all of the focus on police-state style enforcement programs which include ramming through the Real ID act so that they can have biometrics on every citizen, issuing new birth certificates which can be digitally validated, a nationwide identity database, and draconian penalties for businesses which use illegal immigrant labor.

They've settled on a solution to the immigrant problem which relies on the government being able to track the actions of every citizen so that they can tell who isn't a citizen by process of elimination. The problem is that this means monitoring the actions of citizens and maintaining a database to track them. It means that in a few years the US will be eerily reminiscent of the old Soviet Union where government officials could stop you at any time and ask to see your government issued ID card. It means a huge increase in the power of the federal bureaucracy and the potential to monitor every citizens activities and restrict or control the movements of citizens within our borders as well as internationally.

But wait, it gets better. While one hand is fitting us for slave collars, the other hand is picking our pockets.

Everyone knows that farm subsidies are a bloated festival of pork for big agrobusinesses, hurt the small farmers they were supposed to protect, and cause problems for our international agricultural trade. They're also enormously expensive and serve no necessary purpose. Farm subsidies are always on the top of the list of what fiscal responsibility advocates want to cut. Plus they're also opposed by the organic farming industry, family farmers and just about everyone with an ounce of common sense. They're also seen as protectionism which is causing problems for some of our international trading partners and pricing our produce out of international markets. The free market would give everyone a better deal and we could easily cut $15 billion a year from the budget just by eliminating them.

Representatives of the White House and the Department of Agriculture came to the House Agriculture Committee with some reasonable proposals to trim some of the excess spending on subsidies, redirect some of the money away from giant agrobusinesses to small farmers, and use some of the money to promote production of renewable biofuels. Seems pretty reasonable, right?

Well, not only did the committee reject these proposals and other ideas from within the Congress for even larger cuts, but they literally shouted down testimony and held a preemptive vote to continue subsidies at the current levels for 5 more years, and went on to add a huge additional subsidy for cotton producers. And don't think this is a partisan issue. The vote to continue and expand the subsidies was unanimous and included all the Democrats and all the Republicans on the committee. Not one of them showed a single ounce of responsibility or a tiny shred of shame.

Farm subsidies have been a controversial budget issue for decades. They've played a large role in the decline of the small farmer and our growing reliance on agrobusinesses which produce and inferior product and foreign imports which come at higher cost and hurt our balance of trade. The problem is that the agriculture committee is packed with representatives from farm states who get huge donations from agrobusinesses and now that the Democrats are in power it's payback time, even for Republicans who now think they can get away with anything and blame it on the dominant party. It's like the foxes watching the henhouse.

Do they think we're blind? Do they think we can't see the greed, hypocrisy and lust for power which drives these actions? The media lets them get away with these outrages with near impunity, giving scant coverage to budgetary issues or the more negative aspects of immigration proposals. We have to go and find the truth for ourselves, and then make our outrage heard. The outrage which swept Democrats into office in 2006 was clearly misdirected. We only traded one pack of corrupt fools for another. It's time for a complete purge to take our Congress in a new, more responsible direction.

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About Dave Nalle

  • http://www.politicsforumpoliticalworld.com/ Sergei

    I don’t think it’s very helpful to just say “OK, this congress sucks as bad as the last one, let’s replace them in 2008.” Everything happens for a reason. The Dems were elected due to Iraq (and the recent corruption and unitary legislative-executive branch). They were not elected to get rid of farm subsidies, nor to begin mass deportations of illegal immigrants.

    We should probably be talking about good policies rather than just saying the Congress sucks.

    My political forum

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    Sergei, in case you haven’t noticed, they’re not getting us out of Iraq or impeaching the president either. And frankly I’d rather have them make some show of competence at just legislating – the main part of their job – than pursuing the partisan witchunts and mindless isolationism they were supposedly elected to carry out.

    EDave

  • STM

    Mate, don’t let the buggers have every citizen’s biometric details on file. That’s starting to smack of Orwell. Geez, this is the United States we’re talking about … not the old Soviet Union.

    As an Aussie, one of the drawbacks of travelling to the US these days is that upon entry, all a non-citizen’s biometric details go on file, including iris images (eyes) and fingerprints.

    I’m buggered if I’d let the Australian Govt do that, let alone a foreign government. I don’t trust the US to do the right thing with those details, simply because there’s always a risk they can go astray, and I certainly don’t want it to have mine on file. Its own citizens should feel the same way if they’ve got half a brain.

    You have to get out in the streets and let the bastards know how you feel. It’s the only way they’re going to listen.

    Nothing a foreigner can do about it if they want to enter the US, but I believe it’s an infringement of your constitutional rights as US citizens so don’t stand there and let them do this.

  • http://www.taureandevi.blogspot.com Danielle

    Man, you summed up and eloquently voiced my disregard for this Congress. The Democrats are showing their greed, playing games with nonbinding resolutions, all the while “blaming” us with “America has spoken”. Each and every single member of the Democratic Party needs to check their hearing checked because I said no such thing.
    Not in my name.
    An excellent, informative, well written and easily readable article.
    For more of my Modern Musings http://www.taureandevi.blogspot.com

  • Clavos

    I’m with Stan. The biometric ID is the most Orwellian idea I’ve EVER heard proposed in the USA.

    It’s implementation could force me out of here…

  • troll

    Clavos – where would you go – ?

  • Clavos

    If they’d take me, Oz would be my first choice.

    If not, Mexico, because I have dual (US & Mexico) citizenship, so they HAVE to take me.

  • Nancy

    Unfortunately, the ruling class (which is whence most maggots in congress stem, since it costs beaucoup buck$ to buy a congressional seat) has ensured that no one gets elected that is not a member of their own, or vetted & approved by them as being willing to throw in with them. I’m with Dave in urging a complete overthrow/overhaul of congress. Ideally, it would involve hanging all of the bastards & leaving their remains swinging in the winds from the trees on the mall, thereby serving fair warning to wannabe future congressmaggots to keep it clean, honest, & get to work. Howsomever, I’m not sanguine, as these same elites also control the military & police.

    We’re already a police state; BushCo has ensured that, & congress has followed meekly, like good little maggots, while the MSM busies itself reporting on really essential, earthshaking news like Anna Nicole Smith & Paris Hilton for the vast majority of sheeple, most of whom are too stupid, too illiterate, or too lazy to think for themselves.

    Maybe I’ll move to New Zealand, altho I’ve always had a yen for Tahiti ….

  • http://adreamersholiday.blogspot.com Lee Richards

    Excellent article in all regards, Dave, although their actions aren’t at all caused by insanity. They are calculating, unprincipaled, power-hungry, self-serving hypocrites.

    They have one goal:to stay in office as long as possible in order to rip off everything they can for themselves and their friends. And a number of these would-be tyrants are running for president!

    Instead of a donkey and an elephant, they would be more accurately represented by a hog and a hyena–and it doesn’t matter a bit which is which.

    Term limits anyone? And how about some Vietnam war-type street demonstrations and protests to get their attention?

  • Dr Dreadful

    I’d probably have to go back to England, although they’re considering a similar scheme there, I believe.

    Australia sounds good, though. Maybe Clavos and I can set up a sheep station…

  • moonraven

    One thing you all are conveniently forgetting: YOU are the ones who voted those sleazebags into Congress.

    They didn’t go there to do anything except open their hands and bank accounts to bribes and create earmarks for themselves and their compinches in the federal operating budget.

    Clavos, The only good thing about your moving to Mexico is that with your racist attitude you wouldn’t last long….

  • Clavos

    “Clavos, The only good thing about your moving to Mexico is that with your racist attitude you wouldn’t last long….

    Obviously, you haven’t noticed I’m one of the few on this site standing up for the Mexican immigrants?

    And since I am bicultural and have lived in Mexico and traveled there most of my life; since I own property and have businesses there, since I vote there, I don’t think I’ll have any trouble whatever living there full time again.

  • http://adreamersholiday.blogspot.com Lee Richards

    #11:
    It’s true they were voted into office, but let’s be honest. Both parties for more than a generation have grown very successful at deception, dishonesty, fraud, manipulation, misdirection, and corruption as far as rigging districts, trying to steal elections, attack ads, and vote-buying from special interests are concerned.

    They can work at it 24-7 with tons of money and lots of help, while the public has other necessary things to do for themselves. There can be no doubt we’ve been too trusting and gulible and have been taken advantage of at every turn. Power corrupts.

    Those who don’t vote are more to blame than those who do (although many voters do lazily and stupidly just vote a party line or for a manufactured image.) Are we all to blame? Yes, but let’s not make the victims seem just as guilty as the criminals.

  • moonraven

    Huh?

    We had a saying in the 60s: If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.

    Stop making excuses for yourself.

  • http://adreamersholiday.blogspot.com Lee Richards

    #15:
    I have learned to blame myself for my own stupidity. Have you?

  • Baronius

    Regarding the farm subsidies: there’s a rule in Washington that every Congressional committee has pro- and anti- members. The Armed Forces Committee has big DoD people and small DoD people. The Tax Committee has tax-raisers and tax-cutters. The Farm Committee is unique, in that it’s got pro-corn members, pro-soy members, pro-cattle members, et cetera. There’s no “anti”-anything congressmen.

  • Nancy

    I’m beginning to believe there isn’t any difference who or if anyone votes anymore. Both parties are the same people, all of them powerful & wealthy members of the same families & coalitions of wealthy & powerful people. In the past few days, in fact, someone pointed out in the MSM (how did that slip by?) that only a handful of families were hogging almost all the top positions in the US. Lee is right on target: they’re there purely for selfishness, greed, & corruption. Vulture & hyena would indeed be better symbols of our political parties, surrounded by their hordes of camp-following lobbyists & other influence-peddlers.

    MR, quit your holier than thou posing; it’s easy to hurl insults when you’re the one hiding out off somewhere in Mexico, among people you seem to have nothing but contempt for, from your previous comments.

  • Nancy

    I’m beginning to believe there isn’t any difference who or if anyone votes anymore. Both parties are the same people, all of them powerful & wealthy members of the same families & coalitions of wealthy & powerful people. In the past few days, in fact, someone pointed out in the MSM (how did that slip by?) that only a handful of families were hogging almost all the top positions in the US. Lee is right on target: they’re there purely for selfishness, greed, & corruption. Vulture & hyena would indeed be better symbols of our political parties, surrounded by their hordes of camp-following lobbyists & other influence-peddlers.

    MR, quit your holier than thou posing; it’s easy to hurl insults when you’re the one hiding out off somewhere in Mexico, among people you seem to have nothing but contempt for, from your previous comments.

  • Zedd

    Dave,

    You do realize that biometric ID’s consist of a finger print that can be scanned to ensure your identity. The way you right the article its as if you are talking about some sort of chip being installed into everyone.

    The change would be the speed at which your identity can be verified. We have social security cards, visas, and driver’s licenses including various permits. The visa and drivers license has your picture on it. A real fast way to verify your identity. When you get a ticket, it is inputted into a (hold your breath) DATA BASE, through a lengthy process. Why not scan your ID and get everything done right then? How is that an infringement of anything. Its just faster an more accurate?

    If you are worried about the government knowing where you are, the system should be rigged to only attain a certain type if info. However, KNOW that if you are a suspect for anything, the government can find out your purchases and link your paper trail, scans by tolls and light signal cameras, your cell phone, etc.

    Adjust, you old geezer :o)

  • Zedd

    Clavos

    I made some errors on my prev post (off course) so don’t start :o)

    Unless your smarty pants comment will be particularly clever and funny.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    Unfortunately, the ruling class (which is whence most maggots in congress stem, since it costs beaucoup buck$ to buy a congressional seat) has ensured that no one gets elected that is not a member of their own, or vetted & approved by them as being willing to throw in with them.

    I think your definition of the ‘ruling class’ has to be pretty broad to make this statement. What is the ruling class, anyone that owns a late-model car? Look at Tom Delay. He was at the top of the heap and his background was that he put on a jumpsuit and sprayed peoples roaches. Hardly elite.

    And while I appreciate that you like my article, Nancy, this kind of bullshit:

    We’re already a police state; BushCo has ensured that, & congress has followed meekly, like good little maggots,

    Really does nothing to advance the cause of reform. If we’re going to fix things we need to go after real problems, not fantasies and partisan hype like this. You need to learn the line between what’s real and what’s craziness.

    Dave

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    You do realize that biometric ID’s consist of a finger print that can be scanned to ensure your identity. The way you right the article its as if you are talking about some sort of chip being installed into everyone.

    Pretty sure I said nothing of the sort. And while currently no one is using anything more than fingerprints, Real ID is not in effect yet, and it does include provisions for retinal scans and ID cards which can be remote-scanned.

    The change would be the speed at which your identity can be verified. We have social security cards, visas, and driver’s licenses including various permits. The visa and drivers license has your picture on it. A real fast way to verify your identity. When you get a ticket, it is inputted into a (hold your breath) DATA BASE, through a lengthy process. Why not scan your ID and get everything done right then? How is that an infringement of anything. Its just faster an more accurate?

    I don’t want a government which is fast and accurate. I don’t want them to be able to identify me at all and I certainly don’t want them keeping track of any of my information in a database, especially my fingerprints or other biometrics. My fingerprints are private until I commit a crime – that’s the way it’s always been and should remain. This is a classic example of preemptively applying the measures we’d use on criminals to the entire population, and it’s unacceptable.

    If you are worried about the government knowing where you are, the system should be rigged to only attain a certain type if info.

    Fat chance of that.

    However, KNOW that if you are a suspect for anything, the government can find out your purchases and link your paper trail, scans by tolls and light signal cameras, your cell phone, etc.

    Without a warrant? Because this is where that’s leading to.

    BTW, good news – the SCOTUS just ruled that email cannot be obtained without a warrant.

    Dave

  • STM

    DD: “Australia sounds good, though. Maybe Clavos and I can set up a sheep station…”

    You could market it as a mail-order marriage set-up for lonely, single male New Zealanders.

  • STM

    I’m with Dave … why should a government have your fingerprints on file, along with images of your iris and a digital image of your head? The digital image is probably OK for a passport, but that’s about it.

    The taking of fingerprints should be reserved for people who have been charged with committing a criminal act. What’s next? DNA?

    It’s bollocks for a democratic government to insist that it needs this stuff. If you don’t want this to happen, you must agitate against it, or one day you’ll just wake up and boom, it’ll be there before you’ve even noticed.

  • Clavos

    Dave writes:

    “My fingerprints are private until I commit a crime – that’s the way it’s always been and should remain.”

    While I agree wholeheartedly with your justifiable wariness about the advent of biometric ID cards (as I stated upthread), I’m afraid I have to say that you’ve been unusually lucky in not having to have provided your fingerprints without committing a crime.

    Among those who have taken my fingerprints in my life:

    The Army. Not only when I was drafted, but again when I was required to obtain a security clearance for cryptography work.

    The United States Post office, when I worked as a Letter Carrier while in college.

    The Department of Veterans Affairs when I applied for disability and medical benefits.

    The state of Florida, when I applied for and received my Yacht Broker License.

    I’ve had a passport so long I can’t remember for sure, but I think the State Department also required prints the first time I applied for a passport.

    In any case, even though I’ve never been booked for a crime, the government DOES have numerous copies of my prints.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    I know, Clavos. The government’s got more than a few copies of my prints, including prints of my infant feet when I got my first passport as a toddler. But what troubled me was that I had to give my fingerprint for my drivers license when I renewed it earlier this month. There’s no justification for requiring it for a drivers license. What possible justifiable purpose does it serve?

    Dave

  • Clavos

    I see no justifiable reason for fingerprints on driver’s licenses, any more than i see a justification of ANY national ID card, much less a biometric one.

    I understand that there are elements in both Federal and state law enforcement agencies who are lobbying heavily for the biometric national ID cards to have magnetic stripes (similar to those on credit cards) with ALL the information the government has on the individual encoded thereon.

    Talk about Orwellian…

  • STM

    These really are serious issues guys, from my perspective at least. I wonder how many of your countrymen realise just HOW serious.

  • http://www.roblogpolitics.blogspot.com RJ

    Well, I for one can certainly see why farm subsidies are much worse and more dangerous for America than 9/11 or the government of Iran… :-/

    Seriously, I completely agree with Dave that the Congress is out of control and apparently doesn’t give a shit about the American people. But the hyperbole in the opening paragraph was just too much to ignore…

  • Zedd

    Gentlemen

    I fail to see the seriousness of a national ID card. We have social security cards. They are used for EVERYTHING including some our most private affairs our finances. What a more accurate and verifiable system does is make identity theft and fraud in general less likely. Are you afraid of the speed, or the precision of a modernized system?

    I am trying to come up with a problem with this and I seriously cant. We already have legal personal identifiers. Making the system more advanced technologically seems to make sense. Carrying a worn out social security card (that you cant even laminate) around, seems so antiquated. Especially at a time where everyone has good copying devices at home and can emulate this all important ID very easily.

    What the government can do with your information is protected by laws. Just as they cant search and cease your property without a warrant, they cant search your comings and goings without a warrant. The same laws would protect us from abuse.

    The real issues is whether the government can pull it off accurately. Government is big and dumb and I cant see something so precise and convenient ever working. Also there would be a tendency to give contracts to external businesses to carry out some of the tasks that would be required to perform this monumental feat and THAT to me is more problematic.

    If I am missing the scariness of this proposal, please enlighten me. I just don’t see it.

  • troll

    Nancy – beware your Kiwi dreams…

    I had a good friend who moved to New Zealand…the next time I saw her she was wearing oxfords and bobby socks – a pleated calf length skirt – a button up sweater with a poodle emblem – and was sporting a beehive dew

    worst of all I couldn’t check out her color coordination as she was in black and white

  • bliffle

    The feeble attempts the dems make at undermining the country are as nothing compared to the Really Horrible predations of the reps who slavishly authorized an illegal war which will cost us a trillion dollars, break the economy, worsen the mideast situation and end our world leadership role and weaken us to impotence. The they passed the so-called Patriot Act which ensures abject obedience by USA citizens to the will of secret organizations.

    the dems look absolutely puny in comparison.

    Leave the country. Give it back to the indians.

  • troll

    Mark – not to worry too much about the US leadership role in the world…there’s no one out there rich enough or dumb enough to give up the free ride provided by the US taxpayer

  • troll

    that would be bliffle of course – sorry

  • http://happyhunter.iblog.com SCFMH

    ID cards and cameras everywhere could be a good thing, but only as long as everyone has access to the images or data; not only agents of the state. Empowering, not represssive

  • moonraven

    Nancy,

    Wrong again–as usual.

    I am hardly “hiding out”–that’s for fatties who spend their lives in front of the t.v.–in Mexico, or anyplace else. At the moment I am in Caracas, Venezuela, enjoying eatching the Bolivarian process at work.

    As for having contempt for the Mexican people–hardly. I DO have contempt for the corrupt pols–but that’s for corrupt pols anywhere.

    I made a reasoned choice many years ago to leave the US and the obnoxious people in it–like you–for a place I love and which is my home. I fail to see how that is any of your business.

    Since I still carry a US passport, it IS my business to comment about the utter perversity of the US voters–whose only criteria for electing folks are that they are more stupid and more malevolent than the voters themselves.

  • moonraven

    WATCHING the Bolivarian process….

  • Clavos

    Nancy,

    As Heinlein wrote:

    “Never try to teach a pig to sing; it wastes your time and it annoys the pig.”

  • moonraven

    Is that why you are always so belligerantly offkey, clavos?

  • STM

    Lol.

  • Clavos

    belligerently

  • STM

    Troll: “worst of all I couldn’t check out her color coordination as she was in black and white”

    And doubtless claiming to have been an All Black triallist.

  • moonraven

    Oh, clavos is now spending his time checking folks’ typos and spelling errors in blogcritics posts.

    Great life you got there, bucko.

  • Arch Conservative

    Two words.

    Term limits.

  • Clavos

    “Oh, clavos is now spending his time checking folks’ typos and spelling errors in blogcritics posts.”

    Bzzzzztt!!

    WRONG, Buckette.

    I was referring to STM’s “LOL” comment.

    Insecurity, mr…

    I could care less how poorly you spell, teach.

  • moonraven

    Right–you have SOOOOO much else to do with your time.

  • troll

    so…what’s the latest goings on with that Bolivarian process – ?

    seen anything unusual of late – ?

  • moonraven

    troll,

    Nothing unusual. The phoney student protests on behalf of a local t.v. station were exposed a couple of weeks ago when they were given a chance to debate in the National Assembly (after marching there and delivering a document demanding to speak there) and their debate consisted of one student getting up and delivering a scripted speech–the last page of which, with a local PR agency’s letterhead, he forgot and was picked up by the next (chavista) speaker–and then he and the other 9 scheduled opposition speakers walked out.

    That was consistent with the other opposition ploys such as withdrawing from National Assembly elections at the last minute when their polls showed they were not going to get any seats, and it cost the students who were protesting their credibility–showing them to be the spoiled brats of privilege that they had been accused of being. Nothing like shooting yourself in the foot–a seemingly inescapable Venezuelan activity.

    During this process, however, some students who support the government have shown themselves to be good speakers and with good leadership potential.

    But Chavez really has his work cut out for him given the Venezuelan culture of competitive corruption, individualism (in the most negative sense of the term, consumerism.

    I have spent quite a bit of time here over the past 5 years, and am saddened by the level of infantilism more than by anything else.

    Nevertheless, I feel obligated to be hopeful–as it’s the only positive, dynamic process on the planet. I am encouraged by the increasing emphasis on education as well as the other successful social programs.

    The Copa America begins here next week–the first time they’ve had it in Venezuela and 9 soccer stadiums have been either built or renovated–and with it the threat of more protests about nothing and general disruption.

  • troll

    moonraven – I hear rumors that the government is going to start supervising curriculum development at the university level…any truth to that from what you’ve heard – ?

  • Clavos

    “Nothing like shooting yourself in the foot–a seemingly inescapable Venezuelan activity.”

    The chief practitioner of which is none other than Chango Chavez himself.

  • Lumpy

    A strictly controlled discrediting of a strwman opposition sounds just like chavez and his goons. Dictators need internal and external threats to keep the fear level up.

  • troll

    (Clavos – with respect and affection – don’t give up you ‘day job’…you future is not in conflict resolution)

  • Clavos

    troll,

    I know.

    I’m much more adept at fire-setting.

    My mom always wanted me to go to Georgetown and become a diplomat, but I knew better…

    Wait a minute…you’re the one who’s moniker is “troll.” :>)

  • moonraven

    Troll–I assume there is already government oversight of curricula. There is in Mexico and other countries where I have taught–especially in the US.

    That is why Freire was right when he said all education is political.

    Clavos the Racist is at his most infantile today–but of course he tells us that he will not be disappeared in Mexico. What a dreamer….

  • Clavos

    “countries where I have taught–especially in the US.”

    That’s precisely what’s wrong with government-provided education; if they’re paying for it, they feel they have a right to set the curriculum (and a lot more).

    And morally, they’re right.

  • moonraven

    Yep–that’s how educational institutions are accredited. Private institutions must submit their curricula as well–not just public ones.

    Now about that GED you’ve been trying to get….

  • Clavos

    Not all, mr.

    Ever hear of Hillsdale College?

    “Due in no small part to its courageous stand, the College raised enough extra revenue to pay the equivalent of the federal loans that it would now refuse. The Detroit Free Press on January 25, 1981 stated, “Hillsdale after all, is famous as the little college that fights for rightness and independence. From the unlikely location of south central Michigan, it gained its national recognition by drawing its sword against the federal government. No trespassing, it told HEW; we’ll hire, promote, subsidize, educate and influence with no interference from you.””

  • moonraven

    I do not see anything on its website about its being accredited.

    Unfortunately, a degree from an unaccredited college is not accepted by other institutions.

  • Clavos

    Ah, but it most definitely is accredited, mr, by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCA-HLC).

  • Dr Dreadful

    Congressional insanity?

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    I fail to see the seriousness of a national ID card. We have social security cards.

    Ever read the Social Security act or read the back of an older card? They clearly state that the SS card is absolutely NOT to be used as a form of identification and that no private or public group can ask for your SSN as proof of identity.

    They are used for EVERYTHING including some our most private affairs our finances.

    All totally contrary to the intent when the SS was created.

    What a more accurate and verifiable system does is make identity theft and fraud in general less likely. Are you afraid of the speed, or the precision of a modernized system?

    Absolutely. Government efficiency is certainly a frightening thing.

    Dave

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    The feeble attempts the dems make at undermining the country are as nothing compared to the Really Horrible predations of the reps who slavishly authorized an illegal war which will cost us a trillion dollars, break the economy, worsen the mideast situation and end our world leadership role and weaken us to impotence. The they passed the so-called Patriot Act which ensures abject obedience by USA citizens to the will of secret organizations.

    Bliffle, you make the mistake of thinking that the Democrats are not entirely complicit in the things which you mention. They voted for the war, they voted for both Patriot acts, and they’ve voted for all the associated funding. If you think they’re the good guys you’re living in a partisan fantasy. Not that some of them aren’t reasonable people. But some Republicans are too.

    The problem is that the division is not between the parties, but between those who have the best interests of the nation at heart and those whose interests are mercenary, self-serving or who have voluntarily forsworn their oaths to the Constitution and their contract with the people of the US.

    Having said all that, the war’s still not illegal. You weaken your argument when you include talking-points hyperbole like that instead of sticking to the facts.

    Dave

  • Joe

    Who was it that just demonstrated support for the “amnesty bill” by posing in front of dozens of boxes “full” of letters of support for the bill? Some poor schmuck of a reporter had the gall to look: all the boxed were empty. Zip, zero, empty.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    Joe, that doesn’t change the fact that polls again and again show a 60+% support among the public for amnesty and much larger support for a good guest worker program.

    Dave

  • moonraven

    clavos,

    In that case–and I find it surprising that there is nothing on the school’s website that indicates it is accredited so you will have to show some proof–it’s plan of studies had to go through the same US department of education hurdles as everyone else’s.

    Or perhaps you are confusing their refusal to accept federal aid programs as refusal to accept federal guidelines for degree programs?

    Something doesn’t add up here, and I believe it is YOU.

    Nothing new.

  • Clavos

    Right here.

    Scroll down to the Hs.

    I’ll ignore your customary petty sniping.

  • Alec

    Dave – re: Congress must be stopped!

    Hmmm. Seems to me that there is not much difference between the actions of the Congress, the president, and the vice-president. In all three cases, the officials involved declare that they are right and all the dopes who elected them are wrong.

    Look at immigration. When right-wing talk radio docilely regurgitated conservative talking points, Congress and the White House was happy snappy. But now that ordinary people debate immigration reform more vigorously than anything that ever happened in the Senate, various officials have turned on talk radio, and voters, like snarling pit bulls turning on their masters, angrily declaring that something must be done about talk radio. I imagine that they would equally turn on the Internet if they knew how to use their computers.

    Other representatives brag about how they have turned off their phone answering machines and simply delete the mass of emails coming in because the people dare defy them by refusing to defer to their judgment.

    Republicans have found it so much harder to raise money from the average guy that they have closed down some phone banks. Fortunately, they have been able to increase corporate fund raising, so they have not dropped a serious dime.

    And all this despite polls showing the president and the Congress at near-record lows in public approval.

    RE: … they’ve decided to get their revenge for the defeat of the earlier version by putting together a new version which takes out the few, small positive aspects of the old bill and instead puts all of the focus on police-state style enforcement programs which include ramming through the Real ID act so that they can have biometrics on every citizen, issuing new birth certificates which can be digitally validated, a nationwide identity database…

    Yawn. Wake me if this crap passes. There are enterprising goons in MacArthur park and other areas of Los Angeles patiently waiting to forge versions of whatever identity BS the Congress can devolve. And like almost every security aspect of every immigration bill proposed, there is a curious lack of any serious enforcement authority. It’s all smoke and mirrors, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

    RE: … and draconian penalties for businesses which use illegal immigrant labor.

    Again, this don’t matter. Present laws against hiring illegal immigrants are rarely enforced. What is interesting is this odd insistence by some conservatives and libertarians that Americans should support changes in the law that would make them a permanently unemployable underclass. Suicide by free market.

    RE: Do they think we’re blind?

    Yep.

    RE: Do they think we can’t see the greed, hypocrisy and lust for power which drives these actions?

    Yep. The Romans had bread and circuses to soothe the mob. We have earmarks. Throw a few crumbs at Congressional districts and many incumbents magically gain protection against being voted out of office.

    RE: The media lets them get away with these outrages with near impunity, giving scant coverage to budgetary issues or the more negative aspects of immigration proposals.

    Sorry, this is BS. Serious news segments about the budget are ratings losers. I don’t see Fox or the National Review or the Wall Street Journal devoting much time or space to this issues. Instead it is the same droning nonsense: Bush good, mainstream media bad.

    Here in Southern California, the LA Times and public radio stations refused to use the phrase “illegal immigrants” and instead mandated that these people be referred to with the bland and meaningless phrase, “undocumented workers.” The official editorial line, and that of most columnists, is that even if there is anything negative about illegal immigration, it doesn’t matter because, well, just because.

    RE: We have to go and find the truth for ourselves, and then make our outrage heard.

    Yeah? And so? This should be how democracy works, and not depending on people being spoon-fed ideology or sitting back and letting the government run on automatic pilot.

    RE: The outrage which swept Democrats into office in 2006 was clearly misdirected.

    Not at all. Just incomplete.

    RE: We only traded one pack of corrupt fools for another. It’s time for a complete purge to take our Congress in a new, more responsible direction.

    As Bill Clinton might say, depends on what your definition of “responsible” is.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    Most legitimate colleges don’t have to list their accreditation on their website because they have a reputation that’s well enough known taht people assume they’re accredited. I’m sure MR just assumes they’d list it on their websites because the places where she has ‘taught’ did so, probably listing a few of the ‘accrediting’ agencies which will sell a meaningless paper accreditation for the right price.

    Dave

  • Clavos

    mr didn’t look very well on Hillsdale’s own site for the accreditation info.

    Also available on their website:

    The complete writings of William F. Buckley, Jr.

  • moonraven

    Thanks for the link, clavos.

    Just proves my suspicion that you confused refusing federal aid with refusing to submit curricula for approval.

    As usual, hoist on your own petard.

    You ALWAYS take the bait. If you didn’t I would not bother to bait you.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    Awww. Christopher seems to have deleted MR’s latest personal attack where she accuses me of lying about speaking Farsi and about teaching college.

    But since I said that I explicitly DO NOT speak Farsi and only did so as a small child, is she saying that in fact I do speak Farsi and am pretending not to? She’s so mysterious…

    As we’ve discussed before, my teaching experience is verifiable. I may even teach a few courses next year once my current duties to local charities wind down.

    Dave

  • Clavos

    Not quite, snotty one.

    The government does not directly accredit institutions; it only reviews the accreditation agencies (and not all of them).

    Furthermore, according to the USDE’s own website, it does not set curricula; it only ensures that the accrediting agencies (in this case the North Central Association) are reviewing the quality and scope of the programs, not their content.

    Once again, you’re wrong.

  • moonraven

    Me? Now, clav, I am never wrong.

    Having a bad day, are you?

  • Dr Dreadful

    Dave speculates: I may even teach a few courses next year once my current duties to local charities wind down.

    And run for public office?!? What are you putting in your coffee?!

  • moonraven

    It’s the local charities part that made me choke on MY coffee….

    The NERVE.

  • http://www.robot-of-the-week.com Christopher Rose

    moonraven, you made an error in your last comment, typing the word “never” when you clearly meant to type “always”. You must have been distracted, like that Narcissus…

    ;-)

  • moonraven

    As usual, I am objecting to your personal attacks against me.

    That’s behavior unfitting for someone who is a monitor of site behavior.

    Clean up your act, will ya.

  • http://www.robot-of-the-week.com Christopher Rose

    moonraven, actually, you are, as usual, missing the point in your doggedly humourless way.

    I think my behaviour is entirely fitting, but you’re welcome to repeat your complaints to the bosses if you want. Of course, we all know that the last time you did that, you got banned a compulsory holiday from the site!

    Fly girl, fly!

  • http://www.robot-of-the-week.com Christopher Rose

    And don’t forget that I was one of the people, ok, the only person, that didn’t want you to be “vacationed”…

  • moonraven

    Fuck off.

  • Clavos

    Now THAT was a brilliant, insightful rejoinder!

    Well up to (or down to) mr’s usual standards.

  • moonraven

    It was very much to the point, actually.

  • http://www.robot-of-the-week.com Christopher Rose

    Oh, I just thought you were trying one of your panicky little bullying tactics, just like any other grumpy oldtimer. I’m so very very fwightened!

  • Clavos

    Shouldn’t that be vewy, vewy fwightened, Chris?

  • moonraven

    Chris is so puffed up with the pitiful pittance of power he abuses on this site that it’s a good thing he was never part of the SS.

    Of course, he is waaaaay too young to have been part of anything except a kindergarden poop team.

    So why does he need v—– to get it up?

  • moonraven

    Interesting. V*I*A*G*R*A is banned on this site.

    Yet there probably isn’t a single “guy” on here who doesn’t need it in bulk….

  • Dr Dreadful

    Be vewy vewy quiet… we’re hunting wavens.

  • Clavos

    Ehhh, what’s up, Doc?

    Sorry…

    (slinks sheepishly off left)

  • STM

    MR wrote: “Of course, he is waaaaay too young to have been part of anything except a kindergarden poop team.”

    Actually, MR, you’re quite wrong in relation to that. He’s British, not American, therefore you need to do more research as to timeframes in regards to what Rosey may or may not have been involved in …

    He’s probably at least been a soccer hooligan :)

  • http://www.robot-of-the-week.com Christopher Rose

    Come on guys, don’t be hard on Granma. She just likes to ramble on, lost in memory’s bliss. She doesn’t even know what she’s saying half the time, bless her.

    There you go, Gran, just put your teeth back in and sit a while!

  • Ruvy in Jerusalem

    Wooks wike this thwead is about bwoggers’ inanity, not congwessional insanity. Ooooh, dere’s a waven! Lemme get my gun out– oww!! She got my – ohh! ohh! Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!

    Wow! Dat was good! Now I’m wavenouswy hungwy. Boy, dat was good!

    Huh? Wha happened?

    Where did de waven go?

  • Zedd

    “Gents”

    MR has dusted the floor with all of you and now you are ganging up on her because you couldn’t stand alone…(snicker)

    You should admire her instead of insulting her. Take notes.

    Man up boys!

  • troll

    yeah but the question still remains – does she have a sense of the extent of micromanagement Chavez’ administration intends to apply in supervising the education system/propaganda centers

    I was hoping to get back to this with her when the fur settled

  • moonraven

    troll,

    The Chavez administration is simply not capable of micro-managing anything.

    Chavez may have taken the title of God away from Eric Clapton, but most of the folks around him are just the usual Latin American Letmegetmine infantile hangers-on.

    Please remember that Latin America is where the public education auditors of English programs cannot even READ English–and when I offered one a full scholarship to learn the language on Saturday mornings he didn’t even take me up on it.

    Not to worry.

    Somebody should change Chris’s diaper. It stinks of babyshit in here….

  • Zedd

    Troll

    How do you know what Chavez INTENDS to do?

  • moonraven

    He doesn’t.

    he just wanted to use the now-passe term micro-manage.

  • troll

    Zedd – sorry if you misunderstood me to be claiming to know Chavez’ intensions…I don’t which is why I was asking

    again it is clear that we share no common language

    and moonraven – I’ve searched and can’t find that memo…what’s the new approved terminology – ?

  • troll

    that would be ‘intentions’ of course

  • moonraven

    I believe I answered your question.

    Sorry, have to go. Flying out today.

  • troll

    sufficiently…enjoy the flight

  • Zedd

    Troll

    Was this you?

    does she have a sense of the extent of micromanagement Chavez’ administration intends to apply….

    My apologies, it sounds as if you do know what that administration intends to do. It sounds as if you know that they INTEND to apply micromanagement as a way to run the nation.

  • troll

    if you read the question in the context of #49 and #54 and it might make sense to you

  • Clavos

    troll,

    Apparently Zedd was too busy sniffing mr’s butt to read your question with comprehension.

  • troll

    moonraven says – *Chavez may have taken the title of God away from Eric Clapton…*

    dunno…I’d watch this over a political speech any day

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    And run for public office?!? What are you putting in your coffee?!

    Actually, I’m somewhat discouraged by the party structure and single-issue voting which is dominating local elections here. I’m not sure I can win an election without moving to another district or some major change in the current balance of power.

    Dave

  • Zedd

    Clavos

    That was very rude and unbecoming of you. Please don’t do that again.

    Troll and I don’t have an adversarial relationship. I respect his contributions. There is no need to add vileness to the equation. I’m surprised at you!!

  • Clavos

    emmy #106:

    Congratulations! You didn’t misuse any words that time!

    Did you ever get your GED?

  • Clavos

    It’s the internet, Zedd. Grow up.

    Obviously, you can dish it out but you can’t take it.

    For months now, you and others have been giving me a hard time for agreeing with many of Dave’s ideas (#106, e.g.).

    So now the shoe’s on the other foot, and you’re crying.

    Get over it.

  • Zedd

    Clavos

    I was talking about the vileness of your comment. If its not gross to you, fair enough. It was disgusting to me.

    I don’t know Clav reading your comment, I would think that its you who may need to grow up. I’d expect a 12yr old boy to make such a statement and not a older man who claims to be well traveled, speaks several languages, on a political blog, to a woman who doesn’t converse in that manner. However, fair enough.

  • MCH

    “emmy #106:
    Congratulations! You didn’t misuse any words that time! Did you ever get your GED?”
    – Clavnalle

    “Apparently Zedd was too busy sniffing mr’s butt to read your question with comprehension.”
    – Clavnalle (showcasing his superior education)

  • moonraven

    God how that redneck refugee from a Carl Hiassen novel would LOVE to sniff my butt!

    No fucking way….

  • Lumpy

    I love the fact that you moronic leftists are so outargued by clavos and nalle and their actual use of facts and reason that all u have left are childish personal attacks and pre-k quality taunting. Give up and stop embarassing yourselves.

  • moonraven

    Lumpy, Suicide will put you out of our misery. I have someone who can help you with that.

  • troll

    here’s where we need the cartoonist to come up with a picture of a raven with 40DDs bawling out: (#!*##!!) a lump on a log whose balloon reads: ‘geeze – aim those tits at someone else’

  • moonraven

    Too bad the only cartoonist here is ME….

  • http://handyfilm.blogspot.com handyguy

    The NY Times recently profiled a Democratic congressman from Wisconsin, Ron Kind, who has been trying for several years to substantially cut farm subsidies. Speaker Pelosi and majority leader Steny Hoyer voted for this reduction in 2002 [along with 198 others, not enough to pass it]. But now they are nervously guarding their 2006 gains in conservative rural districts by supporting continuation of subsidies.

    And wasn’t Real ID already passed into law more than two years ago by a Republican congress? And didn’t Barack Obama and others introduce an amendment to remove Real ID requirements from the Senate version of the immigration bill? Making this sound like a new idea that just occurred to an “insane” House is, um, not quite accurate.

    I realize this kind of wonkish nuance isn’t quite as much fun to read or write as Dave’s gross generalizations. But since he’s quick to accuse others of hyperbolic ranting, he should be called on his own overstatements.

  • moonraven

    Regarding the subsidies, they will either have to go or the US and the EU can both blow goodbye kisses to participation in the South American marketplace.

    I suspect that they are too stubborn to get rid of the subsidies, as that would mean some folks being voted out of the Washington feeding trough.

  • Lumpy

    I believe the accuracy of my comment in #112 has now been amply demonstrated.

  • moonraven

    Lumpy and accuracy–of any kind–are mutually exclsuive sets.