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TV Review: Luck – “Episode 9″

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“Episode 9″ is this week’s episode of HBO’s Luck. Michael (Michael Gambon, Harry Potter) sends a hit man after Ace (Dustin Hoffman). This worries Ace more than usual, because his grandson, Brent (Jake Hoffman, Dustin’s actual son) is in town. Thankfully, Gus (Dennis Farina) is able to dispatch with the killer, allowing them to enjoy the Derby. Ace’s, er, Gus’s horse wins, but as it does, Michael looks on, plotting his next move.

This is a bittersweet victory. Ace stays safe, and manages to keep Brent from harm, too. Ace’s plans for the horse track are on course, he has cut business ties with Michael, and his steed, whom he cares dearly about, wins a major race. But the threat of Michael, sinisterly sneering down, literally, does dampen the mood. As does the discovery of Israel’s (Patrick J. Adams, Suits) body in the ocean.

Ace feels responsible for Israel’s death, but is he really? Ace does send Israel to Michael, but is not intending or expecting bloodshed to result. Ace clearly doesn’t think Michael will harm Israel, at least not badly. Israel is a simply a business go-between. The tragedy of his murder upsets Ace. Michael is a bad man, Ace knows that, but apparently Ace hopes that Michael’s business side will control his temper. Not so.

“Episode 9,” the season one finale, is billed on HBO’s website as the series finale of Luck, although one episode of season two was filmed before production shut down permanently, due to on-set animal deaths. As to whether that single episode will ever see the light of day, well, that’s still up in the air. As a season finale, “Episode 9″ serves it’s purpose quite well. As a series finale, it leaves much to be desired.

The battle of wills between Michael and Ace is just getting started in “Episode 9,” which makes it a shame that there will be no more to the story. These are two titanic actors, who can both perform circles around most people in the industry. Pitting them against each other in this story makes their struggle seem larger than life, as their characters are. The disappointment at their conflict going unresolved is heavy.

Worse, it’s hard to know who would have won, and at what cost. Michael might have the upper hand, as it stands, because he is ruthless and willing to go further than Ace. Ace is soft, whether because of love or prison, and seeks peace in his life, not war. There is little doubt that Ace could defeat Michael, because of the threat Hoffman allows to simmer in the role, but at what cost? Would he have to sacrifice the soul he is cultivating?

At the crux of this question is, what kind of man was Ace before his stint in jail? Would a slip into darkness be a return for him? Or was he always more of a caring, loyal individual, as he is now, but is he turning dark because of Michael’s betrayal? This isn’t answered in Luck.

Ace’s win in the horse race means that Walter (Nick Nolte) loses. He takes it well, and why not? Second place isn’t horrible. Victory only draws more attention to the horse, whom a snotty young man is trying to take from him. Plus, Walter respects Escalante (John Ortiz). They both work towards the same goals, and Walter isn’t bitter enough to deny a fellow trainer, whom is an honorable man, his due congratulations.

Walter would be more upset if he knew the truth about his jockey, Ronnie (Gary Stevens). Ronnie is the real loser. Walter gives him back his spot because Ronnie cleans up his act. But viewers see that Ronnie is back off the wagon almost immediately, snorting coke. Did Ronnie’s impaired condition have anything to do with the loss? Either way, Ronnie is heading for a big melt down, which will not be good for anyone.

Really, Walter’s mount should have gone to Rosie (Kerry Condon, Rome). She works very hard to shape that horse into a victor, and then loses her position due to inexperience. Rosie does get to ride in an earlier race on Derby Day, though. Which might be what she actually deserves, considering she is still young and relatively new in the industry. And she wins that handily. Still, there is some regret that she doesn’t ride for Walter, even if the two remain on good terms.

About JeromeWetzelTV

Jerome writes TV reviews for BlogCritics.org and Seat42F.com, as well as fiction. He is a frequent guest on two podcasts, Let's Talk TV with Barbara Barnett and The Good, the Bad, & the Geeky. All of his work can be found on his website, jeromewetzel.com
  • Yvonne

    Ditto! I was really enjoying Luck and the season finale is good as just that — season finale. However, as the show’s closure too much is left up in the air and unsettled.

    I think the show could continue without the racing shots as it is filled with a myriad of plots and subplots that could keep it running for a number of years.

    I am definitely going to miss this show!

  • http://jeromewetzeltv.blogspot.com/ Jerome Wetzel

    I agree! I think the racing plots were tied up, but if we could just get an Ace vs. Michael TV movie to provide some closure…

  • Lois

    So sad to see it end, it was a great show. After seeing it I want to go to a race track, there are a few in NJ. Gee are those “animal” people going to shut down the Kentucky Derby???

  • Remi

    This is not fair series over season finale over…and now no closure..please reconsider HBO…don’t let them (we know who them is).. Decide your “LUCK”

  • http://jeromewetzeltv.blogspot.com/ Jerome Wetzel

    Remi – It wasn’t just a network decision. The creators of the show chose to end it because they love horses and they didn’t want to contribute to a show that was resulting in the animals being hurt. I can understand that. But yet, we do need closure to the non-horse stories begun.