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TV Ads with a Social Conscience? Chrysler and Tom’s Shoes Show the Way

An article posted by AARP this week talked about a business that had found a way to connect consumers with a social conscience to a wonderful product. I had been aware of this small company for several years, but up until its commercial-within-a-commercial TV campaign, I had not been aware of the concept. It was pure genius on the part of some advertising agency.

Tom’s Shoes

AT&T partnered with a small shoemaker, Website informationTom’s Shoes, which provided free shoes to children around the world. The young Blake Mycoskie saw a need for children’s shoes in poverty-stricken communities and he was looking for a product he could sell. So he started a business based on this need and found a way to do it profitably. As I remember the business plan, he hired people in third world countries to make the shoes and marketed them with a tag line telling the consumer that every pair of shoes sold also included a pair of Tom’s shoes for a barefoot child in a third-world community—a sort of two for one sale. Enter me, a lover of children, and you have a senior with a social conscience who is wearing a pair of Tom’s shoes! That was back in 2009 and I still wear that original pair.


Blake Mycoskie is the Founder and Chief Shoe Giver of TOMS, and the man behind the growing One for One movement. As of April 2010, TOMS has given over 600,000 pairs of new shoes to children in need through giving partners around the world.
  
This commercial-within-a-commercial tactic worked for both AT&T and Tom’s Shoes, which has since flourishedm with stores throughout the country that sell Tom’s Shoes exclusively. Social conscience had found the perfect business partner. AND it made AT&T look very responsible too. Everyone was a winner.

Portland

When the commercial-within-a-commercial involves a whole city, the number of people who benefit cannot be measured in any concrete way. Still, the feel-good-about-my-city factor has to be a good thing. It is even better when that commercial features a young man who grew up in a part of town not known for its successes. When that positive image in flashed on TV screens throughout the city, young men surely pay attention.

I’m talking about Chrysler’s “Imported from Detroit” series of Super Bowl commercials. Here in Portland we are being shown a local boy, Ndamukong Suh, a Grant High School graduate, star football player at Nebraska, University of Nebraska College of Engineering graduate, and pro football player for the Detroit Lions. He was Rookie of the Year in 2010 and one of the few linebackers to be picked up in a first round NFL draft. The commercial has a larger-than-life feel about it. I am not a football fan but that commercial certainly made me take notice.

In the commercial, Suh drives a Chrysler through Portland passing young men sitting on curbs in middle and lower class neighborhoods. The woman he hugs is probably his mother and the house is pure eastside Portland. I doubt the commercial agency even thought about the “social conscience” aspect of this hometown-boy-makes-it commercial. Still, I see it as an example of how these kinds of images can change our perceptions about people and the neighborhoods where they live.

Suh’s parents are immigrants, his mother from Jamaica and his father from Cameroon. The mother is a graduate of Southern Oregon University and his father attended a trade school in Portland. They met right here in Portland and were married in 1982.

When a 6’4” pro linebacker’s father is 5’8″ tall, you might wonder where the very big, tall son came from. It seems that Suh’s grandfather back in Cameroon was 7’2”. The family name means “House of Spears” in Suh’s father’s native language. How cool is that?

About RetireInStyleBlog

I am a retired educator that has been blogging for 6+ years. I talk about my life as a retiree out here where the rubber meets the road. I love good books and love my TV. I write for Retire In Style Blog as well as It Crossed My Mind Blog. The first is real life and the second is purely fiction or something that resembles it.
  • mike mycoskie

    Thanks for the mention of TOMS in your blog. Yes, the ATT ad was a driving force in moving the company to a profitable position which has now allowed the launch of a new one-for-one giving vision back to people in under-developed countries. Hopefully, there will be more to follow. ATT continues to be a great partner with TOMS on many fronts. They sponsored a “shoe drop” in September during which the 1 millionth pair of shoes was given. ATT execs traveled with TOMS to Argentina for that milestone event.

  • http://tmackorg.com/ Tommy Mack

    Apologies for being tardy in commenting how much I liked your article. As a former resident of Puddletown, it touched a nerve in a very good way as did your perspective. Write more.

    Tommy

  • http://www.retireinstyleblog.com RetireInStyleBlog

    I am just hanging onto my hat…thank you Brent Mycoskie for your comment. I am a fan and a supporter. I loved the ATT connection.

    I also noticed in the news today that Wieden +Kennedy of Portland, the creators of the Chrysler ad, has received awards at the Cannes International Festival of Creativity. How cool is that!

    “Chrysler Brand’s 2011 Super Bowl Commercial “Born of Fire” Takes Home Five Awards at the Cannes Lions 58th International Festival of Creativity” Wieden+Kennedy of Portland, Ore