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Thin Is Not In

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Madrid has a ban on overly thin or waif-like models in their top-level fashion show, The Pasarela Cibeles trade fair. Fearing their underweight bodies would project a negative self-image to the public, the organizers of the fashion week in Madrid say models who are 5 feet 9 inches tall have to weigh at least 123 pounds. How's that for a change in the industry?

The body mass index is a tool for doctors who study obesity. It is calculated by dividing weight in pounds by height in inches squared, then multiplying that total by 703.  If the resulting number is between 18.5 and 24.9, the person’s weight is normal. Below 18.5 is underweight. In the case of the Madrid show, organizers rejected women with indices under 18.

Being such a small portion of the industry, Spain does not dictate what the rest of the world wants to see.  However, it is a step in the right direction.  Young girls model their lives and bodies after what they see on the magazine racks, which is usually a gaunt woman who looks unhealthy, clad in a bikini. Experts say when young women strive to look like models, anorexia ensues.

The move has been proclaimed as good news for younger and lesser-known models, who often force themselves to become thin and unhealthy in order to secure a place among the top models.

Case in point: "Fashion is a mirror and many teenagers imitate what they see on the catwalk," said regional official Concha Guerra.  For now, Spain is concentrating their efforts on models portraying a healthy body image and their only concern is the quality of the work being presented.

Will other cities follow? The mayor of Milan, Italy, Letizia Moratti, told an Italian newspaper this week she would seek a similar ban for her city's show unless it could find a solution to "sick" looking models.  With symptoms such as shrunken bones, mineral loss, low body temperature, irregular heartbeat, permanent failure of normal growth, development of osteoporosis and bulimia nervosa, anorexia affects a lot of young women in the world.

Cuca Solana, the organizer of the Pasarela Cibeles, was brought before the country's parliamentary commission for youth in April to defend the event against criticism that it pressures young women into losing weight.  The Association of Fashion Designers of Spain said Friday it wanted models at the show running from Sept. 18-22 to project “an image of beauty and health” and shun a gaunt, emaciated look.

One can only hope the industry is taking note of this bold move.

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About Roberta Ferguson

  • http://eatingdisorders.suite101.com Lori

    Wow, what incredible news! I’m not sure if it’s the best solution, as banning anything is not the solution, but it does send a very clear message…

  • Nancy

    It’s about time. Actually it’s past time. If only the US fashion industry would follow suit, but I won’t hold my breath.

  • http://tootoothinmodels larry

    i am behind the movement completely. pun not intended!!

  • Nancy

    That IS good news; last I heard, the London fashion organizers refused to even entertain the idea & told the MP who proposed it to stay out of their business. It would seem to me the government and/or an MP would indeed be able to throw a wrench or two into their spokes in the matter of permits etc.

  • http://www.earsucker.com Roberta

    I think that models should portray a healthy body image to the public. At 5 ft 9, a model shouldn’t weigh 115 pounds, it just looks sickly.