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The Sopranos Finale: Perfect Justice?

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Okay, obviously that ending, or lack thereof, made many crazy. Me too, initially. Now, I dig it. Why? Because that was what every day of the family’s life was like. Was that guy with AJ (just in front of him) gonna pop Tony? How about that trucker guy at the bar? How about those two black guys?

When that dude walked past Tony en route to the bathroom, I thought they would do a formal Godfather homage. Namely, a gun is taped to the back of the toilet. What else? Surely, during the painfully prolonged scene of Meadow parking, I thought she would see or hear two or three pops come from the diner. Then, nothing else. They wouldn't say who got shot or who is dead. Just Meadow walking up to the diner and hearing three gun shots. Of course, David Chase knows this and played us like the cheap broken banjos that we are.

So, who in there was going to kill Tony? Did Tony die after the credits rolled?

Maybe, maybe not. That is every single moment of Tony’s life. Maybe, the whole family will be sprayed in blood. Maybe, they will just have another family dinner and bicker about what poor decisions their teenagers are making. That kind of insane tension is what they live with. Bravo!

I will tell you my perfect ending for the show. It was last week's show. Remember how it ended with Tony laying alone in bed with a shotgun? He was exiled from his family, and even his entire state. Honestly, they could have skipped this week's show altogether. It was great to see Phil got popped, though. Now, what did the FBI agent mean when he said "we may finally win this thing"?

Lastly, I hear people say, “I feel like I just wasted the last ten years of my life.” I understand that sentiment, but not because of that ending. What drove me absolutely mad was waiting three or four years in between every season. Just season six (this very last one) took a one-year break. That is the crap that angered me.

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About Lono

  • http://journals.aol.com/vicl04/THESAVAGEQUIETSEPTEMBERSUN/ Victor Lana

    I think Agent Harris was actually pulling for Tony in his battle against Phil. He wanted the Jersey boy to beat the Brooklyn guy.

    I do agree that the ending of “The Blue Comet” would have been a great way to end the series. Having said that, when Tony wakes up at the beginning of “Made in America,” there is a surreal sense of something being wrong (maybe he is Kevin Finnerty?). No such luck.

  • http://handyfilm.blogspot.com handyguy

    Writing and shooting a show this brilliant is not easy or fast, and HBO allowed Chase the time he needed to do it right. Calling the long wait between seasons “crap” that you “had to put up with” shows little respect for the very talented people who gave us an extremely memorable 86 episodes.

  • http://www.iamcorrect.com Lono

    Handyguy,

    I totally disagree. Chase didn’t need three years in between each season. Remember, also, that we have been hearing for the last three seasons that “this is the last”. To me, it reaks a bit of holding out.

    Still, though. The show rules and the more I think about the ending. The ambiguity is awesome!

  • http://blogcritics.org/ Phillip Winn

    Season 1: 1999/01/10 – 1999/04/04
    Season 2: 2000/01/16 – 2000/04/09
    Season 3: 2001/03/04 – 2001/05/20
    Season 4: 2002/09/15 – 2002/12/08
    Season 5: 2004/03/07 – 2004/06/06
    Season 6: 2006/03/12 – 2006/06/04
    Season 7: 2007/04/08 – 2007/06/10

    Three years between each season? It seems not!

    The hiatus periods between seasons were nine months, eleven months, sixteen months, fifteen months, twenty-one months, and ten months. At least one of those was due primarily to James Gandolfini’s salary demands.

    I didn’t like waiting, either, but let’s keep a little perspective here, okay? :-)

    P.S. I know they call seasons six and seven a single season, but eleven and ten episodes for a show that normally has thirteen to a season makes it two seasons in my book.

  • http://www.iamcorrect.com Lono

    ok, you bastards, I have been caught in a mild exagerration. I told you all a million times I am seeing help for that.

    now, let’s talk about the finale. What do you think about the FBI guy diming out Phil? Also, was that FBI dude’s wife? I assumed it was, though others seem to imply she was a ‘gumar’.

    thoughts?

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    John Cleese said it took six months to plot and plan each episode of Fawlty Towers. I prefer the way he and Chase work compared to the rest of Hollywood.

    Maybe if more creative types worked this way, we shows like Simpsons and Seinfeld wouldn’t be spewing crap so many years after they jumped the shark. Life is too short and there’s too many other things to do.

    “but eleven and ten episodes for a show that normally has thirteen to a season makes it two seasons in my book.”

    Yes, but by calling it a super season, HBO tried to get out of paying everyone for a full season. It didn’t work as the supporting cast members balked and held out.

    Back to the show, rarely do married people work together and have sex at hotels during the day. It’s all that TV making you soft. More books for you!

  • Tommie

    I have watched the last episode of the Sopranos many times, and finally reached this conclusion. David Chase is either a genius or the worlds laziest writer. The last scene was Jim, Edie and Robert. There was so much non-acting it was astounding. AJ: “Remember the good times”? When did Tony ever say that? AJ wasn’t being his usual belligerent, argumentative self. Tony looked completely relaxed, not wary, and had a small smile on his face the whole scene. Carmela greeted Tony gently and with a smile, and didn’t seem concerned about the indictment threat, and Meadow is way too smart to not be able to parallel park. Come on, the jokes on us.

  • http://blogcritics.org/ Phillip Winn

    Lono, you’re kidding, right? The FBI agent told Tony he was overreaching, but then didn’t like letting down the big guy, so he slept with someone still in the loop to get the info and give it to Tony.

    Then he seemed almost surprised at himself for cheering when Phil got popped, but not really. Everybody wants to make the big guy happy.

    If they’ll put out season six on DVD, all 21 episodes, for the same price as the first five seasons, it’ll almost be a bargain.

    Not really, but almost.