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Teen Celebrities and Their Purity Rings

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I think it’s safe to say that most teenagers feel pressure to have sex. They're exposed to it through popular culture as well as real life, with movies like Juno and celebrities like Jamie Lynn Spears. Many teenagers (though the number is declining) have had sex, but many haven’t. Now, many celebrities have come out to say that they want to be virgins until they are married.

Some of the most popular are the Jonas Brothers, Miley Cyrus, Hilary Duff, Demi Lovato (Camp Rock), Selena Gomez (Wizards of Waverly Place), and Jordin Sparks (American Idol). The Jonas Brothers, whose new album is climbing the charts, are among the most famous. Their father used to be a minister, and religion significantly influences their lives. All three boys are virgins and plan to stay that way until they are married.

Joe Jonas, one of the singers, who turned nineteen on Friday, referred to the rings as "promises to ourselves and to God that we'll stay pure till marriage.” His brother, Nick, the youngest, who sings as well, added, “I got mine made at Disney World. It's pretty awesome." Joe’s and Nick’s big brother Kevin got his done at Tiffany’s.

Nick’s purported girlfriend (both reps deny the relationship) Selena Gomez (pictured in Glendale, California promoting teen involvement in the presidential election) also joined the boys and said about the ring, "It's something I made a promise to myself about." Selena’s best friend (and the Jonas Brothers’ costar in Camp Rock) Demi Lovato has also made the pledge.

After rumors of pregnancy, Nick Jonas’ ex, Miley Cyrus, got a ring to debunk the rumors. "It's given me the street cred to say that would be impossible, because I'm living my life the way I believe is right and that is to stay pure."

Although the purity ring is personal, Hilary Duff tells US Magazine that it’s hard to be a virgin. "It's harder having a boyfriend who's older because people just assume. But [virginity] is definitely something I like about myself. It doesn't mean I haven't thought about sex, because everyone I know has had it and you want to fit in."

"It's hard everyday, but I made a promise to myself," Jordin Sparks, the American Idol winner two seasons ago, said. "Temptation is always there… It's all about making the right choice and not putting yourself in that situation."

Purity rings are a serious thing and it’s great that many celebrities are setting a good example. Of course, Britney Spears had a purity ring and look where she turned up. So it is really unclear if these celebrities are being honest or if it just a publicity scam. Regardless, they do have a positive influence on real people; my twin sister just bought one from Amazon. Ultimately, it’s every person’s own choice, but it’s refreshing to see so many young stars with purity rings.

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About Maddy

  • http://quiverfullfamily.com Jennifer @ Quiverfull Family

    Refreshing to learn that the concept of purity before marriage has not been completely tossed out the window by popular culture, and that remnants of God’s best plan for our lives are still present :).

  • Jordan Richardson

    No, it certainly is comforting to learn that the concept of purity before marriage now means having a ring custom-made by Disney World or picking one up at Tiffany’s.

    Face it, the conception of purity with the likes of Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers exists for one reason and one reason only: $$$.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    what would be refreshing would be for people to stop proclaiming their sexual experience, including the lack thereof. the same goes for religion like comment #1. If you were so certain you were right, there would be no need to prattle on about it

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    What would be “refreshing” is to stop writing about the Jonas Brothers, Miley, Hilary, the Spears, ad nauseum… Actually, it would be relief.

    Maddy?

  • Jordan Richardson

    Not reading the articles you don’t want to read would probably be the cure for that.

    Kevin?

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    Thanks Jordan, you’re right of course, but reading such innocuous articles is not the problem. I was pointing out the need NOT to write them in the first place, with what little sarcasm I could muster up in my first comment.

    Unable to escape the barage of articles written about these teen idols on an almost daily basis, Maddy contributes her fair share as well, I was hoping she could write about something else for a change. Meaning, for a 17 year old girl, it would be interesting (my opinion) to broaden the horizon of interests and perspectives on a myraid of topics socially, politically, culturally etc etc – and before you ask, no I don’t think teen idols are culture.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    And where can we read the horizon-broadening articles you wrote when you were 17, Kevin?

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    There’s no time like the present El Bicho, no time like the present, to start. Despite the appearance that I’m picking on a 17 year old, I do have faith that the youth of America – even 17 year old Maddy – are thinking, talking, and even writing about more than just teen idols. I hope so anyway. We’re talking about opinions and ideas here, fresh ideas, not some simulacre found in any dimestore magazine at the counter of a 7-11.

  • Jordan Richardson

    You probably want to look up some of Maddy’s articles, Kevin. She covers a wide spectrum of topics.

    And I second EB’s request: where are the articles you were writing when you were 17?

  • Jordan Richardson

    no I don’t think teen idols are culture

    They are if you’re a teen, Kev.

  • CallmeMaddy

    Thank you El Bicho and Jordan.

    Kevin,

    First of all, I would like you to look at my writer’s page please.

    August 11th–Interview with Jack Ingram, one of the hottest country stars around. I also covered his concert and his CD.
    August 7th–Thoughts about the IRAQIS participating in the Olympics.
    August 11th–Toby Keith being called a racist. I also wrote a piece on his movie a couple days ago.
    August 17th–Selena Gomez promoting teens to get voting. I went to her event. I’m sorry if she’s a teen star, but that is something more than teen “gossip.”

    There are many more examples in my 151 articles. Some of them are about teen “gossip,” but many aren’t.

    I would also like to point out that the reason I was told to write for this site is Eric (the creator) wanted more TEEN viewers and this is what TEENS are interested in. I am a teen, you know.

    The point of this is my articles do vary, but I write what interests ME. And I happen to think it’s great that some teens are not having sex. Maybe this article will encourage other teens not to either. Maybe not. But it is still worth mentioning. This article encouraged my TWIN SISTER to get one, so maybe it encourages someone else.

    But maybe you don’t get that because this article was meant for teens. And you’re not a teen.

    And unless I’m in school, I’m not forced to read anything I don’t want to. And I doubt you were told to read this for school. No one is making you read such an article that isn’t meant for you.

    If there’s something you want me to write about, go ahead. I’m on summer break and I’m bored. Give me a topic. An “adult” topic. I’ll do it and I’ll do it right. I can do political (Big republican, don’t you know?) article or a sports article (Go Steelers). Seriously, challenge me.

    And yes, you are picking on a 17-year-old.

    Maddy

  • http://www.associatedcontent.com/user/39420/joanne_huspek.html Joanne Huspek

    Can you define “virginity?” Because my 18 year old and 21 year old have a totally different take on it than I do. For example, I include all forms of *sex* as SEX. They do not. I’m wondering what Hillary Duff thinks of as sex.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    I was going to follow up my ignored request to Kevin for what are no doubt deeply insightful articles from his youth, but Maddy did such a fantastic job laying the wood upside Kevin’s head I am in awe and am just going to reread her comment.

    [one read comment later]

    WHOO-WEE! Maddy, are you sure you are summer break? Because it appears you just took Kevin to school. We’ll work on you being a Republican later. :)

    I am going to pass on Joanne’s comment and not get myself in trouble.

  • http://www.futonreport.net/ Matthew T. Sussman

    “Unable to escape the barage of articles written about these teen idols on an almost daily basis”

    I am very impressed with Maddy, being able to physically hurl paper copies of her articles at Kevin’s home, without knowing where he actually lives.

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    laying the wood upside Kevin’s head

    more like a soft pillow El Bicho.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    No, she pretty much annihilated you. I picture ashes in a chair and your silhouette blasted onto the wall behind it. And we are still waiting on the essays of your youth, or are you one of those “do as I say, not as I do” critics?

  • Jordan Richardson

    We’re also still waiting on your answer to her challenge:

    If there’s something you want me to write about, go ahead. I’m on summer break and I’m bored. Give me a topic. An “adult” topic. I’ll do it and I’ll do it right. I can do political (Big republican, don’t you know?) article or a sports article (Go Steelers). Seriously, challenge me.

    Kevin?

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    C’mon El Bicho, lighten up there, sheesh, you think I kissed your grandmother or something.. Your request for writings from my youth is to demonstrate what exactly?

    I would also like to point out that the reason I was told to write for this site is Eric (the creator) wanted more TEEN viewers and this is what TEENS are interested in. I am a teen, you know.

    Which leads me to another point I would like to make, why not create a section just for teens on BC and seperate it from the “adult” section?

  • Jordan Richardson

    Because most of our readers can usually discern between the articles they want to read and the articles they don’t want to read. There’s no need for separate sections.

    Kevin, do you intend to continue to dodge the perfectly reasonable requests we’ve made?

  • CallmeMaddy

    Kevin,

    Because even though I have written about 30 articles this month, I don’t have time to write enough articles to hold an entire “teen” section.

    And I would really like a topic to write about, Kevin. I’m not entire sure what I’m going to write about today.

    Maddy

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    “lighten up there”

    Really? How amusing this coming from you. If you followed your own advice, you wouldn’t have commented here. Sorry, but you don’t get to decide what others define as culture. I am no fan of any of the knuckleheads mentioned in the article or their work, but then I am not a teen.

    “Your request for writings from my youth is to demonstrate what exactly?”

    That it’s very easy to tell others what they should be doing as opposed to doing it yourself. That fact that you apparently have no evidence of young Kevin covering “a myraid of topics socially, politically, culturally etc etc” makes your advice ring rather hollow.

    Jordan has made clear why there’s no need to segregate the teen articles. Was there some confusion on your part from the title “Teen Celebrities and Their Purity Rings” the subject matter or intended audience?

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    Let me break it down for you El Bicho:

    1) Check your response to Jennifer, comment #1, you don’t get to decide what others define as religion.

    2) I haven’t verified this, but I’m pretty sure I don’t need your permission as to where I comment on this blog, nor how I state my opinions. Oh did I mention, what I choose to read?

    3) Yes, in my opinion, writing about teen idols is not culture. It is about mass consumption, uniform branding, false dreams, and blending in. It is the opposite of independant ideas and thinking.

    4) My initial comment followed on the heels of both yours and Jordan’s and was, and still is, sarcasm. I do not dictate what people should or should not write, I was only lamenting, that the recent barrage of articles by Maddy we’re on teen idols. And as a young woman approaching the mythic age of 18 and adulthood, from minor to major with all the responsibilities that come with it, I was hoping for Maddy’s personal insight, opinions and ideas on life. And not something that she was asked to regurgitate.

    5) Reading what I’ve written in the past has no bearing on what I’m writing now. Color me curious, bit I’m interested in writing about the issues of today, in my chosen field of arts and culture. If you want to test that El Bicho, you’re welcome to check the articles I’ve already contributed to BC or on my blog.

    6) And finally, the point isn’t whether the reader can differentiate between one article and another – it is to have a category, specific to the genre of pop culture, not culture, but pop culture, where other writers like Maddy can contribute.

  • CallmeMaddy

    Kevin–

    I am still waiting for a topic to write about. Please note that an article about the Pittsburgh Steelers and a country music article went up today. Another country music article is in pending. Although, I am in the middle of a Jonas Brothers article. :)

    Seriously, give me a topic. This could be fun.

    Maddy

  • Jordan Richardson

    Yes, in my opinion, writing about teen idols is not culture. It is about mass consumption, uniform branding, false dreams, and blending in. It is the opposite of independant ideas and thinking.

    Wikipedia, using Carther Vaughn Findley and John Alexander Rothney’s Twentieth-century World as a reference, defines culture as “patterns of human activity and the symbolic structures that give such activities significance and importance. Cultures can be ‘understood as systems of symbols and meanings that even their creators contest, that lack fixed boundaries, that are constantly in flux, and that interact and compete with one another'”

    The Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines culture as “the behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular social, ethnic, or age group” and cites as examples “the youth culture” or “the drug culture.”

    And finally, Blogcritics’ own webpage defines culture as:

    “1 the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively
    2 a refined understanding or appreciation of this
    3 the customs, institutions, and achievements of
    a particular nation, people, or group”

    Now whatever moral quandaries you might have about today’s modern teen culture (you may find it phony or what have you), there is no denying that it IS culture.

    Reading what I’ve written in the past has no bearing on what I’m writing now.

    Exactly. What you wrote about and were interested in when you were 17 had no bearing on what you’re writing now. Think about that for a moment. What were you writing about when you were 17? What were your interests at that age?

    And finally, the point isn’t whether the reader can differentiate between one article and another – it is to have a category, specific to the genre of pop culture, not culture, but pop culture, where other writers like Maddy can contribute.

    Somehow it seems to work out fine as it is. You’ll note that in terms of categories, Maddy’s article above is filed, correctly, under “Culture: Celebrity” and “Culture: Society.” Works for me.

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    I’m glad it works for you Jordan, it doesn’t for me. So where does this leave both of us, basically at opposites. Once again Jordan, read what I wrote and pick out the distinctions between what is, for the sake of argument, fact and opinion (my opinion) and your hell-bent desire to prove to me that POP culture is culture with a big “C.”

    I agree with your “googled” definitions of culture, I have no problem with those definitions, in the broader sense of how culture shapes society. Meaning, along with culture comes tradition, religion, spirtualness, customs, dress, food etc etc – all things that pop culture does not possess. Pop culture, which I consider teen idols to be part of and which I have been stating here all along, is pure fabrication, the media, hype, superficiality, stardom, TELEVISION, ad nauseum, that will have no productive and lasting impact on the youth of America, other than turning them into Idol zombies.

    I have no moral quandaries about today’s modern teen, which you’ll have to define for me Jordan, what you mean by modern? For the record, I have a teen at home and no I don’t lock him in his room shielding him from such banality.

    Exactly. What you wrote about and were interested in when you were 17 had no bearing on what you’re writing now. Think about that for a moment. What were you writing about when you were 17? What were your interests at that age?

    Exactly. I’m glad you’re alluding to or at least hinting at what you’re a couple of breaths short of saying I believe, without putting words into your mouth, that this is all teens are capable of thinking about – teen idols. I am in total disagreement. Maddy is going to be a senior, she’s young yes, but still a teen infatuated with teen idols, I don’t believe it for a second. Of course age and maturity has something to do with it – go take a look at some of the commentary left by readers of Maddy’s postings, I’m guessing, 11, 12, 13 years old max, but we’re not expecting them to be adults just yet now are we. My point is this, if you broaden the cultural influences, no matter what the age group, you at least give yourself a chance to create a free democratic and balanced society.

    If you must know, my senior year in high school was filled with creative writing classes, Sci-fi lit where I discovered the likes of of Clarke, Asimov, Vonnegut and many others, sports, science, math and the desire to be outdoors un-glued from the television and pop culture.

  • Jordan Richardson

    Kevin,

    You stated that “writing about teen idols is not culture.” It is. The depths of that discussion, how it shouldn’t be thought of as “culture” or how it’s not very cultural or intellectual is none of my concern. I have very little interest in teen celebrities, for the most part, although like Maddy I have reviewed Miley Cyrus’ latest and, horror of horrors, like Maddy I enjoyed the album.

    Meaning, along with culture comes tradition, religion, spirtualness, customs, dress, food etc etc – all things that pop culture does not possess.

    Nonsense. You don’t think there’s a very carefully articulated and coded tradition going on here? You’re not looking hard enough. You may not *like* this particular brand of culture, but whether you like it or not, this teen and pre-teen brand of stuff very much contains all of those variables. And as to religion/spiritualness, that distinction is hodgepodge.

    that this is all teens are capable of thinking about – teen idols

    Not what I was saying at all. In fact, Maddy has proved otherwise by referencing her other articles. If what she is interested doesn’t satisfy your “higher thirst” for something more, what is it of your concern? She likes sports, she’s a Republican (*cringes*), she likes a wide variety of music, and is very articulate when it comes to discussing them. I happen to think that’s pretty great. And, for the record, her articles are a hell of a lot more interesting to me than yours. I suppose that means I lack “culture,” too.

    if you broaden the cultural influences, no matter what the age group, you at least give yourself a chance to create a free democratic and balanced society.

    Ooookay? And? For every kid into Miley Cyrus, there’s a kid into something else. We have what you could consider a broad cultural distinction in our society. There are tons of articulate kids out there, just like Maddy, that have other interests and other senses of culture. Hell, there might even be another little version of you running around. If you’re concerned about a lack of balance at Blogcritics in terms of teen writers, you’re welcome to refer more of them to Eric. Or, failing that, crank up your old internet machine and see what they’re talking about. Maddy writes about what she enjoys, not what you want her to enjoy. And she’s more than capable of broadening her horizons, too. You still haven’t provided an answer to her challenge, by the way.

    If you must know, my senior year in high school was filled with creative writing classes, Sci-fi lit where I discovered the likes of of Clarke, Asimov, Vonnegut and many others, sports, science, math and the desire to be outdoors un-glued from the television and pop culture.

    Last night I read Wittgenstein while sipping a rakija. After that I watched the Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus Best of Both Worlds DVD again, with 3-D glasses on, and set my TiVo for Degrassi. Before bed, I listened to Bach and read Heller.

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    Jordan, this is getting redundant…

    You stated that “writing about teen idols is not culture.” It is. The depths of that discussion, how it shouldn’t be thought of as “culture” or how it’s not very cultural or intellectual is none of my concern.

    My bad Jordan, teen idols and the pop culture that surrounds them, is not culture. It is my concern and the point I was making.

    You don’t think there’s a very carefully articulated and coded tradition going on here?

    Nope.

    And, for the record, her articles are a hell of a lot more interesting to me than yours. I suppose that means I lack “culture,” too.

    Coming from a cinephile, this doesn’t surprise me. Don’t be absurd Jordan, it just means you’re not interested. The difference is that it’s a value judgement, I may not like your review of the “Dark Knight” or even agree with it, but it doesn’t mean it is less interesting. I could think of some other adjectives though if you would like. Everyone’s a critic as they say.

    Maddy writes about what she enjoys, not what you want her to enjoy.

    I didn’t say that, hell, we even share a little common ground through no influence of mine. I too have been a Pittsburg Steeler fan since I was a young teen – ah yes, Bradshaw, Mean Joe Green, numerous Superbowls, what an epic journey.

    Last night I read Wittgenstein while sipping a rakija. After that I watched the Hannah Montana/Miley Cyrus Best of Both Worlds DVD again, with 3-D glasses on, and set my TiVo for Degrassi. Before bed, I listened to Bach and read Heller.

    I’m sorry.

    PS Please Maddy, call the hounds off! Here is your “challenge” How about an article on growing up as a teen in Darfur? Your thoughts, emotions, whatever, can be fiction, non-fiction, documentary, doesn’t matter, your choice.

  • CallmeMaddy

    Thank you, Jordan. Degrassi is a good show, isn’t it?

    Now Kevin … when you say I’m a teen infatuated with teen idols, you make it seem like that all I am. I am very mature for my age. I am not running around doing pot or sleeping around and I have a high GPA. I have had a job taking care of an autistic girl (Not easy) for 3 1/2 years. It’s perfectly normal for teens–especially girls–to follow their favorite celebrities, but that’s not all there is to me.

    Now, to prove this, I really would like you to give me a topic to write about since every article I apparently have written in the past is not good enough for you. I will write it even if it requires research.

    Maddy

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    Maddy,

    this is what I said: “she’s young yes, but still a teen infatuated with teen idols, I don’t believe it for a second.” Bad grammar Maddy on my part, no harm or criticism intended. I DON’T believe this is all you’re interested in. I don’t doubt either any of your qualities, GPA, compassion for others and anything else you do – it would be ludicrous for me to do so. I apologize if you felt targeted, I was saying just the opposite.

    Please, for the last time, it is not what I like but what you like Maddy. I just felt that there was already a glut of this type of writing out there, that didn’t broaden or deepen the subject or even question it. I personally thought at least for me, you we’re capable of writing more compelling things. I’m curious to know about Maddy the writer and not Miley the teen idol. It is my subjectivity and my personal feelings, nothing more.

  • CallmeMaddy

    You want an article on Darfur? Fine. I’ll write it tonight.

    I actually am quite interested in genocides. I read a book about the Rwandan one and I almost cried. This woman hid in her closet for three months with 7 others and heard her family die. And she forgave the killers. This article could be quite fun.

    :),
    Maddy

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    No, let me break it down for you, Kevin.

    1) My comment had nothing to do with someone’s definition of religion. Read it again. I stated I am tired of hearing people talk about their religion.

    2) Nowhere did I state you needed my opinion for any of these things, so I am not sure why you have created yet another straw man. However you do look rather foolish coming into a teen article and complaining it’s a teen article.

    3) Newsflash: you aren’t the only person in the world this site, this section, or for that Maddy caters too, so pardon us for not shedding a tear that your delicate cultural sensibilities have been offended by an article on teen pop culture.

    Considering you have only contributed six articles in your time at BC, it appears you yet again find it easier to tell someone what they should be doing rather than following your own advice and setting the example.

    4) Maddy doesn’t need me to defend her but if you had looked at her writer’s page you would have seen that she is covering more than just teen idols. And even if that was the case, why should she not do as requested by the site owner if that subject matter interests her? It could lead to other and better opportunities for her.

    5) No one said it had any bearing on what you are writing today. Are you having that much trouble comprehending the comments because this is at least the third time you have misconstrued what was written just by me?

    6) Now you are being completely disingenuous because you don’t want teens writing these types of articles at all, so what would be the need for a separate section? Not speaking for Eric, but it is likely that there isn’t enough content yet to spin off its own section.

    I question if you really understand what culture is outside the over-inflated importance you invest the things you like with . Pop culture definitely has “tradition, customs, dress, food.” To say otherwise is false. And many people find religion to be “pure fabrication…that will have no productive and lasting impact on the youth of America, other than turning them into…zombies.”

    “How about an article on growing up as a teen in Darfur? Your thoughts, emotions, whatever, can be fiction,…”

    If that’s your suggestion, your high culture posture loses credibility. A teen reacting to Darfur would be one thing, but unless Maddy has been there, how could she write a serious article from that perspective? She has no basis to know what it would be like for her to grow up in Darfur. Besides, BC doesn’t do fiction.

    I understand you don’t care for articles about pop culture. There’s plenty of stuff I don’t like that appears on BC as well. The only way you can assure you will see material you want on BC is to write those articles yourself. I would be interested in reading your articles on Darfur as I don’t think the subject gets near enough coverage, so please provide a link.

  • CallmeMaddy

    Kevin,

    Your article.

    Maddy :)

  • http://www.artasauthority.com Kevin Freitas

    Considering you have only contributed six articles in your time at BC, it appears you yet again find it easier to tell someone what they should be doing rather than following your own advice and setting the example.

    No, El Bicho, despite what you think to be true, quantity does not prime over quality. We can compare hat sizes next week if you want, but please, do not delude yourself into believing that I cannot lead.

  • pat

    Whatever!! All of you get over yourselves!!! You people are thinking WAY TOO FAR into this!! Maddy you go girl!!!! I think you are awesome! You go and do your thing! Don’t let the OLD Farts bother you!

    Any way… back at the article at hand….. as a girl that saved herself for marriage (no religion involved it was fear for having to tell the ‘Rents that I was knocked up that would have been scary!!) I am glad that there are “cool” kids out there that are making it cool. Maybe that will decline the number of teens out there with unwanted pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. I personally think that more “Pop Culture” or “Teen Culture” needs to bring this to the forefront as a way to proclaim that it is okay to say Not Me Not Now!

    That is why I believe that Maddy was asked to write this piece as a way to show teens that it is okay… and who better to tell than a teen about teens saying no.

    Nuf said!

  • Alayna

    I <3 all the celeb invlvement in purity. I got a purity ring recently, though I had already determined that I’d be pure. I’m just glad to see good, old-fashoned values still in play today.

  • Kristyn

    I completely believe in saving sex till marriage. It was how I was taught when I was growing up and its definetely nothing to be ashamed of. I know tons of kid at my school that are sexually active and thats just not my thing. I will find that right person in my life that I will share it with and I won’t be doing it every night like all the kids at my school.

    Its a promise to myself that I will stay pure till marriage. And I highly believe in that.

  • [[>>.Ashlie.Absinthe.

    i have a purity ring ;; i actually get made fun of for having one which sucks but i believe im doing the right thing. my parents asked me to pledge at least until im ready and sure its a person i love my mom says i dont have to wait till marriage. i want to be pure until im ready not when everyone else decides its cool not to be.

  • Sarah

    Maddy,
    I think your article is great!

  • Eh

    Hilary Duff is a virgin? O.o; I just doubt a lot of these celebrities are really virgins. I think they’re just using the rings for the image or they feel guilty for “sinning” and are trying to be ,like, born-again virgins or something.

  • Eh

    And how the hell could a ring make you pure? If you want to stay a virgin ’til marriage, fine, your personal choice but getting a ring and flaunting it is kind of dumb. You don’t need a ring to make and keep a promise to God.

  • Mercedes

    Purity Ring??? True love waits??? The stupidest thing ever. Have sex with someone who you love and that loves you too before getting married doesn’t mean you’re a whore or something like that… And carry a ring on your hand as a “sign” of your “pureness”, doesn’t make you a saint 😉

  • Breanne

    They may not have kept their vows but it was the thought and desire to try to stay pure that counts.

  • Bo

    I think the purity ring is not so much for show as some people are touting it as. To me, the ring is a reminder to the one wearing it. Granted some may see it as an opportunity to share their beliefs with others that ask about it, but for the most part, I believe the ring is a reminder to the wearer to hold true to their beliefs.

  • Desi Jo

    It is rather difficult to believe that Miley Cyrus is still pure, however, the Jonas Brothers have done nothing to create an image that they are not pure. In all, they are some of the cleaner teen stars around.

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