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Tag Archives: feminism

Theater Review (LA): ‘Broadly Speaking’ at ACME Comedy Hollywood

BroadlySpeaking

This monthly show utilizes comedy, games and stories to raise awareness of women's actions and causes. Read More »

Alice Walker’s Daughter Swings the Feminist Pendulum

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It isn't good enough to disavow a belief system. Read More »

Book Review: ‘Let’s Start a Pussy Riot’ – Curator Emely New, Edited by Jade French in collaboration with Pussy Riot

Feminist protesters marched by security out of Moscow cathedral for offensive performance

More than just a book about feminism, this is an expression of support for everyone who has the courage to stand up and be heard. Read More »

Marriage and Children are No Longer Top Female Priorities

Women should not be automatically expected to have children. Read More »

DVD Review: She-Wolves – England’s Early Queens

She-Wolves documents the difficulty early queens of England had asserting power. Read More »

Book Review: The Sealed Letter by Emma Donoghue

Definitely recommended if you enjoy historical novels, or are interested in First Wave feminism. Read More »

Book Review: My Escape: An Autobiography by Benoite Groult

A fascinating autobiography by one of the founders of modern feminism, Benoite Groult. Read More »

Book Review: Beginning To See The Light: Sex, Hope and Rock-and-Roll and No More Nice Girls: Countercultural Essays by Ellen Willis

Two reissued books feature some of the best essays of rock critic and social observer Ellen Willis. Read More »

Theater Review (NYC): ‘Rapture, Blister, Burn’ by Gina Gionfriddo

Amy Brenneman, Kellie Overbey, and Virginia Kull in Rapture, Blister, Burn at Playwrights Horizons. Photo by Carol Rosegg.

Amy Brenneman stars as Playwrights Horizons calls on the deities and demons of feminism, from Freud and Nancy Friday to Phyllis Schlafly. Read More »

Why Hemingway Would Shoot Himself Again If He Were Alive and Writing Today

How feminist, deconstructionist literary criticism killed the strong male protagonist. Read More »