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Spammer and Alleged Software Pirate Sues

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Spam scum George Allen Moore Jr., “Dr. Fatburn,” didn’t like being outed by angry geek and went to court:

    Francis Uy, a self-described computer geek from Ellicott City, decided to fight back by employing a tactic increasingly used by a small cadre of e-mail users fed up with spam: Outing spammers by posting their addresses and phone numbers on the Internet, enabling network operators to block their e-mail or to sue them.

    But Uy’s target is counterattacking, resulting in a court date today in one of the more personal and unusual spam litigation cases to date. George Allen Moore Jr. of Linthicum argues that Uy’s site is harassment and wants it pulled off the Internet.

    Some anti-spam vigilantes use the information to give spammers a taste of their own medicine, bombarding them with e-mail, signing them up for catalogues and products they did not order and flooding them with phone calls.

    In court filings, Moore claims he received about 70 packages and 200 magazines at his house because of Uy’s site, as well as numerous phone calls with threatening messages such as “we are watching you” and “don’t start your car.”

    ….Moore, who uses an e-mail moniker of Dr. Fatburn, said in an interview that Uy broadcast the presence of his Web site on numerous Internet discussion areas, which incited others to harass him. In his filing in Anne Arundel County District Court, he also accuses Uy of making some of the calls.

    So Moore contacted Howard County police, and secured a temporary court order that generally is reserved for keeping spouse abusers away from their targets.

    But while the order prevents Uy from going near Moore or his property, it does not require Uy to pull down his Web site. And Uy vows a court fight for his First Amendment right to publish it.

    “My Web site doesn’t say anything about harassing him,” Uy (pronounced Wee) said. He denies ever contacting Moore directly, except through an initial phone call when he first got an unsolicited e-mail advertising some of Moore’s software products.

    ….Moore is no stranger to battles over his activities. He is identified as a prolific spammer by Spamhaus.org, which maintains a worldwide directory of notorious bulk e-mailers that serves as a blacklist for Internet network operators trying to reduce spam.

    Meanwhile, Symantec Inc., makers of Norton anti-virus software that Moore sells at cut-rate prices, claims that the versions that he provides are pirated.

    “We’re aware of the guy and we know what he’s doing,” said Chris Paden, director of corporate communications for the company.

    Paden said Symantec bought copies of Moore’s products online, and determined they were counterfeit. He said the matter has been referred to the company’s attorneys.

    Moore said he sells official versions of the software, and has never been contacted by Symantec.

    “If I was doing something wrong, I think I would have heard,” Moore said. [Washington Post]

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About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: Twitter@amhaunted, Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.
  • Perhaps we should classify spamming as a form of terrorism, and sic John Ashcroft on him?