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Somebody Needs A Spanking!

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Ok kiddies, line up, because y’all need a whupping. Teenagers have it incredibly easy and yet they whine and bitch and complain about everything. “Wah! The sun’s out”, “Today is a day that ends in ‘y'”, and “My pockets hurt” are some of the examples of kids with waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay too much time on their hands.

So much has changed over the years. Our grandparents were at war so they were too busy with saving the world than to complain about things. Our parents were working at a young age and didn’t have fancy things as cell phones and computers that the act of being melodramatic was a myth. Even people my age weren’t as “advantaged” when we were teenagers. Sure we had the Internet, but it was dial-up, so forget about downloading songs…we had to buy them at the store you bunch of tightwads.

Considering that some of top bands are punk bands complaining about things that don’t really don’t worry about complaining; but hey, when you’re a middle-upper-lower classer, you don’t have much to complain about really except for being out of bottle water and being really thirsty and having to watch a VHS cassette because Blockbuster was out of ‘Eurotrip’ on DVD (which, BTW is the bestest movie EVAR!!!!!!!!!!!!1111111 rotflolololoLOL!!!111111).

I don’t. I just don’t get it. Why are teenagers so god-damned whiny. And they’re getting older and older. With the abundance of technology and the easy access of mommy and daddy’s money has allowed teenagers to never grow up. Every week it’s a different cell-phone and guys are starting to have more pairs of shoes than girls. In five years time, you’re going to have 25-30 year olds gushing over Hello Kitty and using Lipsmackers…and the 25-30 year old women are going to be screwed up too.

Watch out for the coppers too because if you’re under 18, they’re out to get you. I was reading on some site that this guy was pushed around by 5 cops or so because he was breaking a curfew law. He cried foul that the cops were hassling him, but they should have bigger fish to fry. Look kid, I’m pretty sure the cops have better things to do than hassle some 15-year-old. Think rationally; there was prolly some old woman calling the cops because there were some kids around…which in your stupid city, is against the law. The kid went on to complain about how he was also being hassled about underage drinking by some cops. He was “rationalizing” underage drinking that if he and his were relaxing, it was no big deal. Excuse me for there being laws for you and your buddies to not being able to drink after a hard day at the office. Then again, the kid was American and if it was Coors Light he was drinking, there would be no way he could get drunk, so he could drink away for all I care. It’s a good thing though he wasn’t in Canada because if he took a sip of Molson Ex he’d be drunk for weeks. Laws are in place for a reason. He might get angry at reading this and shoot me. He would then “rationalize” his actions and say that I was saying things that were not nice and he shouldn’t have to go to jail. Free speech kicks ass.

Look, just because you haven’t recieved an e-mail from your girlfriend in the 10 minutes you last spoke does not mean she doesn’t love you nor does it mean impending doom on your life. People are dying in foreign wars, children are starving worldwide, and people are polluting our planet for personal gain. Problems such as having a pimple or the school cafeteria serving hamburgers instead of pizza are no big deal. Little things should not be a concern. Everyone is important and so is you, but you missing the O.C. is not.

Have a talk with your grandparent about the wars. You’ll soon be thankful that you have what you have.

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About James Gore

  • http://www.steveflanigan.com Steve

    One thing I would like to add to this. Our Grandparents had to work for everything they owned. Sure, they might get lucky and have a pair of second hand shoes given to them, but for the most part, if you want something bad enough, you worked for it.

    I have seen kids in their mid-teens with their own Platinum and Gold cards. These cards were co-signed by their parents; after all, what company is going to issues a high school kid a card with fifteen thousand plus credit on it?

    Get an education, get a job and – quit your bitchin’!!

  • http://www.miscellaneousramblings.com kim

    I’m a high school teacher and you have them pegged. Over the past few years it has become worse. There is no sense of personal responsibility whatsoever.

  • http://www.rodneywelch.blogspot.com/ Rodney Welch

    Columns such as yours are a sign of aging, not maturity. Mary Schmich put it best in her popular “Wear Sunscreen” Speech: “Accept certain inalienable truths. Prices will rise. Politicians will philander. You, too will get old. And when you do, you’ll fantasize that when you were young, prices were reasonable, politicians were noble, and children respected their elders.”

    If you want to live in the past, go for it; personally, I think people are just as fucked-up from one generation to the next.

    There are human advantages to this generation that their grandparents didn’t have. Just one example: the “Greatest Generation,” as has often been pointed out, was also the last one that lynched people — and the 1940s and 1950s could be positively murderous for any black man or woman with a sense of dignity. And forget being gay. Forget being a lot of things.

    Snap out of your fantasy world and live for today.

  • http://walker.homeunix.org/kblog/ Kurt Nordstrom

    You left out the key line when you quoted that speech, Mr. Welch:

    Respect your elders..

    Sure, there are many things that are better now than they were then, and yes, the “good old days”, get idealized. But let’s face it…there are a lot of spoiled brats in this day and age, and it’s a sad state, regardless of whether you remember a better time or not.

  • http://www.rodneywelch.blogspot.com/ Rodney Welch

    Face it, there were spoiled brats from the beginning of time. There were wealthy, never-had-to-work brats and people who took shortcuts to wealth all over the 1920s — F. Scott Fitzgerald depicted them in The Great Gatsby. And there are good young people, too — I’m 45, and I feel certain the kids I grew up with in the 1970s were no better and in many cases were worse than the current crop of 18-year-olds: one of whom I’ve co-raised and a few of whom I know.

    The Book of Ecclesiastes had it down: there is nothing new under the sun.

  • http://walker.homeunix.org/kblog/ Kurt Nordstrom

    Fair enough. They should’ve been spanked in the 20’s, and they oughtta be spanked today.

  • http://jamiegore.modblog.com James Gore

    I think you missed my point a little. My main problem is the melodrama, which I blame partly on technology and laziness. There is no doubt that the generation before mine and the generation before that had “maturity” problems, but even the flower children had ideals. My sister’s friends love to wear Che Guevara shirts, but they have no idea who he his; but they heard he was a bad-ass so that’s all that matters to them.

    Oh, and I wasn’t talking about 18 year olds, although, it does seem like that with each passing year more of them seem childish. I meant the 12-16 year old set. The ones that don’t have any responsibilities yet still think the world revolves around them.

  • http://www.rodneywelch.blogspot.com/ Rodney Welch

    Hell, people in the 1960s and early 1970s didn’t think much more about Che Guevara than that he “was just a bad-ass dude.” Nine-tenths of the people wearing the shirts back then didn’t know jack-squat about Cuba or Batista or Castro or what Che had to do with it all; I forget myself, tell you the truth. Was it the hair?

  • boomcrashbaby

    Generations ago, when someone grew old, their family, usually their children, cared for them day and night.

    Then came the rise of nursing homes, where people could conveniently shuffle off their parents to have a place to wait to die, without being a burden on their children.

    Now those children are old, and lamenting about a lack of respect for their elders.

    You reap what you sow. It isn’t about technology making people lazy. It’s about creating a society 1) that is obsessed with beauty and youth, 2) that makes it convenient to ship off the elderly to nursing homes, and 3) creating a culture that has ADD, where people won’t listen to what you have to say, if you can’t say it in a convenient sound bite. It’s called the MTV effect or something like that. Each generation it seems has a shorter attention span than it’s predecessors, hence when they do pay attention to something, it’s more and more likely that it’s going to be something about themselves like a pimple, or their fav tv show.

  • http://www.foliage.com/~marks Mark Saleski

    i really wonder about the long-term effects of electronic “stuff” usage.

    kids are incrediby plugged-in. it used to be just television. nows it’s gaming consoles, game on the pc, email, instant messaging, movies on the pc….and it appears to be endless.

  • http://www.rodneywelch.blogspot.com/ Rodney Welch

    boomcrash — What do you suggest families do when an elder member can no longer take care of him or herself and is constantly vulnerable to further falls or illnesses? Is there a preferable solution to a nursing home? A lot of families would love to know what it is.

  • boomcrashbaby

    There are certainly instances where an elderly person is so incapacitated, that constant care is required, I think overall, our society disposes of the elderly too easily though, it’s become like divorce, it’s easier to do than the effort needed to maintain a relationship. I’m not convinced technology is the culprit behind such laziness though.

    Look at China and how they revere their elderly. They are considered wizened. It is the families responsibility to care for them until they die. Even when the elderly require as much supervision as a newborn. It’s a cultural mindset.

    In my own family, when my grandmother reached the age where she needed help just to get through the day, family stepped in. My uncle moved in and helped with everything from bathing to feeding. (if he wasn’t such a viable option, we would have just moved her in with one of us. He ended up getting the house, so it was a reasonable deal he was happy with.) I don’t see that family support anywhere in this country anymore except in the hispanic community, yet Latin America and China have all the technology we have. I bet you’d be hard pressed to find a Chinese teen that doesn’t have a gameboy. It’s not technology to blame, it’s a cultural mindset. That’s my opinion.

    Of course it’s hard to take care of the elderly when you are up to your eyeballs in a second mortgage, trying to pay off that Land Rover or Hummer, have a tv and telephone in every room of the house, have a swimming pool in back, etc. Those other countries I mentioned don’t have the ‘priorities’ we have.

  • boomcrashbaby

    This country has to be the only place where you can turn on Judge Judy or any similiar court show and see a mother or son sue each other over a 500 dollar loan. That’s not laziness, it’s a cultural mindset over the definition of family.

  • http://www.rodneywelch.blogspot.com/ Rodney Welch

    You seem to be of the opinion that the majority of people in this country are rolling in wealth, elderly parents are considered a mere nuisance to be shed of, and no one has the kind of decency that you claim for your own family except in China. I don’t buy it. Everyday people with average or below-average incomes and more than enough problems already have to come up with some way to finance the care of elderly parents — and they do it.

  • boomcrashbaby

    No, I don’t think the majority of people in this country are rolling in wealth. I do think, by seeing divorce statistics, family members sue each other, a larger percentage of elderly in nursing homes than most anywhere else in the world, people putting into laws and amendments that what constitutes a family is based on genitals rather than love, etc. I just see a different cultural mindset, respect for the elderly here than anywhere else.

    Heck, your original blog here was about the lack of respect for the elderly. We agree on the problem, just not the cause. Blame video games and cell phones if you want, it’s common for people to blame technology for things. But not only did we invent the cell phone to make our life easier, we invented the wheel and the building structure to make our lives easier too. That’s technology too.

    I believe based on how I see America treats it’s elderly, that we have a different cultural mindset and we reap what we sow. We are all in this together.

  • Neptune

    I just want to say, how is it that all teenagers get lumped together? Yeah, so we whine, but not as much as some of the adults I know. Some of us still are taught proper morals, it’s just hard to respect an adult who looks at you, notices your age and assumes you’re up to no good. Now, who’s really to blame for the collapse of western civilazation as it has so cleverly been called, the children, or the adults who teach them to act that way.
    And if we complain, some of it is for a good reason. Maybe things get blown out of proportion, but, well, it seems like the only way people notice you exist. And maybe if our parents weren’t always fighting, and there actually seemed to be people who honestly cared what a kid thought, we wouldn’t have to whine to be heard.

  • Dean

    Technology and liberal judges and politicians are to blame for these kids being they way they are. Get rid of the lib’s, bring back corporal punishment–both public and private–and society will be a hell of a lot better.