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Scarlett Johansson Escapes the Clutches of Scientology

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Scarlett was supposed to be in the cast of Mission Impossible 3 (MI:3) but was removed from the cast due to “scheduling conflicts.” Those “scheduling conflicts” might (or might not) have included her unwillingness to put Scientology into her life after Tom Cruise allegedly tried to recruit her:

    Cruise invited Johansson to a Scientology center where he showed her literature about joining his controversial church, according to a report. “After two hours of proselytizing,” according to RadarMagazine.com, “Cruise opened a door to reveal a second room full of upper-level Scientologists who had been waiting to dine with the pair, at which point the cool-headed ingénue politely excused herself.”

Thank goodness.

For more, please visit FilteringCraig.com
I can give up Katie Holmes to the dark side, but losing Scarlett Johansson would have been much worse because she is talented to levels that Holmes could only dream of.

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About Craig Lyndall

  • http://www.docofdiets.com dietdoc

    Scientology is certainly getting a great deal of ink – digitally and on paper – of late, isn’t it? Did it get this much notoriety when John Travolta “was turned” or is Tom Cruise the biggest fish landed yet?

    I am so out-of-the-mainstream I am not at all sure what the heck the CoS is and, more importantly, why I should be the least bit interested in them. Is this something I should care about or is it some Hollywood cult like the Moonies? Is this different from knowing if Harrison Ford is Catholic, Jewish, or Buddist? Of is Brad Pitt is a Druid or a Hindu?

    If anyone can inform me of what the buzz factor is, I would appreciate it.

    Cheers,

    Ron

  • http://www.biggesttent.blogspot.com/ Silas Kain

    Scientology is not much different from Christianity and Islam. They have a philosophy of brow beating members. Coercing wealthy people to join is a very important component. They have their celebrity center because they know that most in Hollywood fear the publicst machinery so they come under the protection of the Church of Scientology.

    Those members that give the most climb the spiritual ladder to a point where they are cleansed or whatever. Let’s not forget that Christians could purchase their way to Heaven not that long ago. It’s just another Church. Mankind, in its infinite quest for power, has made the word ‘church’ synonymous with greed, lust and extermination.

  • http://w6daily.winn.com/ Phillip Winn

    For a primer on Scientology, check out Operation Clambake, the website the CoS sued to shut down. That site has everything from a quick leaflet to a detailed biography.

  • http://www.biggesttent.blogspot.com/ Silas Kain

    Thanks for the link, Phillip. Now I know what my core problem is. There are many Thetans trying to gain control of my meat body. As a matter of fact, Xenu has been trying to contact me to let me know that he has escaped the force field that has imprisoned him for so long. Xenu says that he must come and inhabit the body of a female human host. This female host will then try to reproduce by selecting a male ‘clear’. Problem is that those who are trying to carry out Xenu’s mission got the word wrong. Xenu says to get humans queer, not clear. Now you know the rest of the story.

  • http://www.docofdiets.com dietdoc

    Silas writes: “It’s just another Church. Mankind, in its infinite quest for power, has made the word ‘church’ synonymous with greed, lust and extermination.

    Reply: I understand, Silas, thanks. And thanks to Phillip for the links. I have been to Clambake and read a bit about the subject and, from the information presented there, I have to admit old LRH had some interesting ideas about “religion.”

    I think it is safe to say that I, as a relatively poor person, have little to fear from a Scientologist knocking on my door. I just wondered why we should care about the weirdness of our Hollywood breathren.

    Cheere,

    Ron

  • http://www.biggesttent.blogspot.com/ Silas Kain

    I think it is safe to say that I, as a relatively poor person, have little to fear from a Scientologist knocking on my door. I just wondered why we should care about the weirdness of our Hollywood breathren.

    Indeed, Ron. Christians go for the poor and uneducated. Muslims go for the oppressed and the angry. Jews just keep their power base. Scientologists go after the money. Is there any religion remaining that nurtures the soul?

  • Bonnie

    I am a christian and am not poor and uneduacted.

  • Ken1020

    Thanks Bonnie, valuable insight!

  • Sammael

    Having read clambake, it seems to me that Scientology is nothing more than a powerful cult. It’s members are subversive, untrusting of anyone not associated, and willing to do just about anything (read the memo on Scientologists who try to leave) to reach their goals. The Church (or lack thereof) of Scientology is a very scary prospect, very scary indeed.

  • Kyle

    I’m not a Scientologist but..

    So you read clambake. That’s an anti-Scientology site.

    If you wanted to learn about black people would study the website of KKK and assume that what you read was correct? Now that’s going to give you an objective understanding of our African-American friends.

    Clambake has nothing good to say about Scientology whatsoever.

    Whenever, I see a purely anti-anything website, makes me wonder what the hidden agenda or personal issues of the person making the site is.

    If Scientology was really as bad or as crazy as some of these websites make it seem, people would be running away in droves, not joining it.

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    >>Clambake has nothing good to say about Scientology whatsoever.<<

    There is nothing good to say about Scientology, based second hand on the philosophy of Aleister Crowley. It’s a religion of total selfishness and egomania. Perfect for Cruise. Not so good for society as a whole.

    Dave

  • noname

    Based on Aleister Crowley? What beliefs in Scientology are related to Crowley’s beliefs might I ask?

    As for the actual article, I read on wikipedia (you can check that out as it gives both the critics arguments and the Church’s claims) the thing with Scarlett and Tom. The official reason for her leaving was scheduling problems. So far neither of their representatives, or at least Scarlett’s, commented on the issue so it is technically kind of up in the air.

  • http://none.com Bob A. Booey

    I have an OK Scientology story I’ll share someday when I have the energy to type it out.

    That is all.

  • noname

    “There is nothing good to say about Scientology, based second hand on the philosophy of Aleister Crowley. It’s a religion of total selfishness and egomania. Perfect for Cruise. Not so good for society as a whole,” says Dave. Well, Dave, apparently there are a lot of people who disagree with you, including government officials.

    I always wonder these people who say Scientology was influenced by black magics and whatnot, what exactly is the black magic part in Scientology? This guy is full of bogus “facts”.

  • HmmmHmmm

    Clearly, “noname” is taking issue with any criticism of Scientology, and is throwing in some peculiar “black magic and whatnot” comments that had not been mentioned by any other posters to date. Methinks thy defensiveness gives thy loyalties away . . . perhaps thou art a Scientologist? Scientologists, unlike other religions, are quite prepared, by the way, the make “fair game” of their critics . . .

  • thinline72

    Well… It must certainly be a horrible world we live in. One need only observe the news media and primetime TV drama, day after day, to agree that it’s mostly horrible. A victim is the thing to be. You bet.

    How much good news is reported? What, where and how is any good happening in the world and shouldn’t the news media give it equal billing? Of course,not to mask dangers we need alerted to, i.e., a convicted rapist on my block, a major development in the war, a hurricane approaching my community, etc.

    But really, isn’t there more good occurring out there that’s newsworthy? Good things are newsworthy too, aren’t they? I mean beyond casual anecdotal human interest fluff, i.e. the birth of quintuplets, the cat who finds it’s way home from 200 miles away, the latest lotto winner and some guy who plays piano with his feet.

    I guess if negative events truly outnumber positive & constructive ones, then life as we know it must be worsening. Compound upon that, the fear & anxiety created from just hearing so much negativity over & over, on top of the knowledge that yes! the bad events indeed occurred and situations do exist… Got it, OK!

    We need the news for information, but we also need hope and inspiration. Fear, anxiety & depression thrive and increase from the lack of hope and inspiration. Hearing and learning of positive information eases anxiety, promotes hope and gives people a better outlook– more to look forward to. We make our future, and how it turns out has a lot to do with whether we move ahead in fear or in optimism. Aren’t optimistic people
    more fun to be around and more productive?

    Some of us remember a time when in addition to the daily paper, there were but 3 TV networks with only a couple 30 minute newscasts per day each. Now, we have several networks devoted entirely to 24 hour news, and heavily competing for our attention. How much NEWS can there be anyway?!! Well, considering NEWS is supposed to be NEW, hence the word NEWS– there really isn’t much. It’s just repeated…”Around the world every 30 minutes!”. Their sponsors include every over-the- counter and prescription product for headache pain, acid indigestion, PMS, allergy relief, erectile dysfunction, depression, itching, you name it. And devoting too much attention to this alone, in addition to your job, your commute and your spouses problems, day after day, year after year can make one a candidate for one or more of these products. It can add stress and worry about your health, your environment, etc. It may not the sole source of stress, but who needs more sources of stress? Most people sitting in front of the TV or reading the paper are trying to relax after another tough day in the rat race. How ironic and how unfortunate. But of course, the medical/pharma infrastucure is counting on us all to stress-out for their bottom lines. But I say, get outside! Have a beer and listen to a game, throw the frisbee with your kid or the neighbor, go to your kid’s little league game– and don’t be the one constantly griping and complaining at the coach, the umpire or your kid for not being perfect. Have your sense of humor, and not at someone elses expense. Laugh at yourself once in awhile.

    Each individual has the choice of whether or not to pursue and engage upon positive constructive activity and exchange. A person’s condition in life is the result of how he regularly chooses to act. The state of an individual, a family, a business, a nation, etc., is the result of the majority of the choices made within whatever scale.

    A very positive person has a tough time within a group of pessimists, but there are still examples of how this actually made them even stronger and able to rise above to escape such peers. Unfortunately, it seems that all too often, people eventually buy into the majority viewpoint and thus fail to fully experience or realize good health, their potential and their dreams.

    With the exception of “natural” catastrophes, the state of this world is totally up to it’s inhabitants. Meaning, if your house gets struck by lightening, anything else wrong there is still probably of your doing, so pick up your dirty socks.

    Now on the victim scale, beginning from the person whose crotch was burned because MacDonalds didn’t put warning labels on their coffee cups, all the way to the holocast survivors and all points in between, at what point should we place those who had a less than ideal experience with Scientology or got goofy advise from Tom Cruise?

    How significant is this on the grand scale, or most any scale?

    The intensity of many anti-Cruise/anti-Scientology in these forums, would be better directed towards Muslim Extremists, Nazi war criminals or the IRS– or might I say, better suited as such.

    If the news media were regularly reporting the dangers of Scientology, on a fraction of a fraction of the magnitude to which they report on gas prices, interest rates, war casualties, meth labs, bank robberies, carcinigens, global warming, choking hazards for toddlers, automobile recalls, etc. (sorry if I’ve missed any favorites here), then there might be cause for an issue with Scientology.

    But I never really hear much about it except on the tabloid side of the media, particularly when some celebrity Scientologist gets a little too excited about helping others– and even then, it doesn’t come close to competing with the usual celebrity sex scandals, steroid & drug scandals, murder scandals and don’t let me leave out CELLULITE– yeah, we worship our celebs for physical perfection and sex appeal, but those pesky paparazzi always have a way of finding the cellulite don’t they? What a let down– our poor poor role models. Isn’t Paris Hilton your role model?

    Based on the current modus operandi of all our news media, it would seem logical that Scientology must be a good thing. I mean if they’re monitoring Scientology as much as the hole in the ozone, baseball’s steroid users or Britany Spear’s cellulite; there should be a great deal more danger being reported on Scientology. And if they aren’t watching the CoS as closely, then why not? Yeah, it must be a good thing alright. If it doesn’t appear to be relatively newsworthy per
    media standards & practices… this equals “good thing”. And “good thing” apparently doesn’t maintain the ratings. Make sense?

    We need more good things. High network ratings just aren’t a factor in my personal enhancement program. But we also need to hear more about the good things without having to reverse calculate that they must me good on the rare occasions we hear of them. The great thing about the web and forums, is that it’s all for, by and of the people. What we write here isn’t subject to the approval of CNN, Fox, Hollywood or any government agency. So let’s relish this freedom and be civil to each other, be constructive and positive as we can. Be inspirational too. It will make a difference to those around us and they’ll appreciate it.

    Scientologists aren’t perfect, but they’re certainly not terrorists either. They’re actually trying to help. Silly Tom Cruise, jumping on Oprah’s couch, is still trying to help. He sure didn’t approach Brooke Shields with a bomb strapped to his chest.

    Creating a positive effect at least 51% of the time represents and contributes to overall betterment of things. Lots of individuals, groups, beliefs, organizations and businesses do more to help than harm. I think we should be hearing and learning more about them all. This would do a lot towards reducing stress and stress related conditions for everyone.

    Meanwhile, smile at others, laugh at yourself, laugh at Tom Cruise, kill your TV, invite the neighbors over for BBQ and get on with your life OK.

    Anyone reading this who mostly disagrees with it or doesn’t accept this point of view, particularly because they think I sound like I possibly just might happen to be a Scientologist or probably am one, doesn’t represent 97% of anyone’s viewpoint anyway and I would warn that small percentage to be careful with their drive-thru coffee. Read the warning label on your cup and try not to make a bad day for any of the rest of us.