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Rolling Stones Guitarist Ronnie Wood to Release a Solo Album This Fall

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Longtime Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood will release his seventh studio solo, I Feel Like Playing, this fall. His first release since 2001’s Not For Beginners will feature guest appearances from his friend of many years Slash, ZZ Top’s Billy F. Gibbons, Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, singer/songwriter Kris Kristofferson, Pearl Jam vocalist Eddie Vedder, Rolling Stones backup vocalist Bernard Fowler, Stones bassist Daryl Jones, and drummer Jim Keltner.

Wood joined the Rolling Stones subsequent to the departure of Mick Taylor. Prior to The Rolling Stones, Wood played in groups including The Faces, The Jeff Beck Group, and The Birds. The disc will be priced at $13.98.

I asked Fowler about the upcoming release, and he told me, “This is the second album I produced for him, and the hardest because of what he was going through, and it can plainly be heard.” He adds, “With the help of Bob Rock and friends, it is a well rounded record, if I must say so myself.”

Wood’s most popular solo album was 1979’s Gimme Some Neck, which was supported by the New Barbarians tour. The brief tour featured Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards, jazz bassist Stanley Clarke, Meters drummer Joseph Zigaboo Modeliste, former Faces compatriot keyboardist Ian “Mac” McLagan,” and Stones sax player Bobby Keys. Without hesitation, the live performances I saw at the New Barbarians were among the finest I have ever seen.

Not meant as a complete discography, here are some of the solo works from members of The Rolling Stones current lineup.

As far as other current members of the Rolling Stones with solo albums, Keith Richards has also released solo albums, three with the highly venerated and critically acclaimed X-Pensive Winos, Live at the Palladium, which was recorded in Los Angeles, California, Talk is Cheap, and Main Offender. Richards also had more than a few fingerprints on the 1997 self-titled Wingless Angels album, on which he co-produced guitar and backing vocals. He has also appeared as a guest on many other albums.

Richards’ solo works have certainly been more well received than those of Mick Jagger.

Among albums on which Richards heavily contributed is the soundtrack album to Hail, Hail Rock and Roll, a Tribute to Chuck Berry.

Fowler, who has toured with the Stones for over two decades, appears on solo albums released by Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts, Ron Wood, Keith Richards, and Mick Jagger. Bernard Fowler’s own 2007 solo album, Friends With Privileges, is also well worth the ducats to check out.

Over the years, Watts has released several praiseworthy solo jazz discs.

Stones keyboardist Chuck Leavell has his own solo works as well. His newest release is 2008’s Live in Germany: Green Leaves & Blue Note.

Blondie Chaplin, also a backup singer for The Stones, released Between Us, a beautifully executed and produced solo album in 2006.

Although Rolling Stones backup singer Lisa Fischer won a Grammy Award for Best Female R&B Vocal Performance in 1992 with “How Can I Ease the Pain,” a single from her So Intense album, her fans are still waiting for another solo full-length disc.

Rolling Stones basist Darryl Jones has not yet released a solo album.

Watch a video, “New York Minute,” featuring Bernard Fowler, the producer of Ronnie Wood’s upcoming album:



 

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About Phyllis Pollack

  • Phyllis Pollack

    That is an astute comment you make about Keith when it comes to “giving up the funk.”
    It actually makes perfect sense that Keith would have some functified offerings. Aside from his work with The Rolling Stones, all you have to do is even just go back as far as KR’s interest in reggae, and what he has done with the reggae artists he has worked with.
    Clearly, Keith Richards understands rhythm, more than most other rock and roll artists.
    He understands it well, and he certainly knows how to use it. Funk music is based on rhythm.
    Black musicians are immeasurably more well-versed in polyrhythmic music than almost all of what we have seen come from Eurocentric music.
    KR gets it.
    So what you are picking up on is correct.
    I could go on more about this in depth, but I wanted to be succinct here.

  • fede

    Hi brothers, im from argentina, love roonie, his soul, his geminis spirit, energy and off course his songs, for me IVE GOT MY OWN ALBUM TO DO is maybe one of the best albums in history, in argentina we hear a lot that album
    love man

    freddy from SER (banda of pop/rock)
    love, love, love wood`s

  • David Snaggler

    This review is void of the usual insights you have into the actual contents of each song. I get a feeling that release doesn’t hit the right key!!

  • David Snaggler

    Now that I see your Examiner review, it must be a pretty good album. I guess you hadn’t heard it yet when you wrote this one