Today on Blogcritics
Home » Culture and Society » RNC Informed Voters, but Questions Remain

RNC Informed Voters, but Questions Remain

Please Share...Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

This week’s Republican National Convention (RNC) came and went smoothly. Several important themes emerged. This article will explore the themes of the convention, as well as many areas requiring further explanation over the pendency of the Fall campaign.

First, Mitt Romney is a man who has considerable experience in the private sector and as a governor of Massachusetts. As governor, Romney guided the state to a surplus. He had success stories in businesses like Staples and a very positive experience in revitalizing the steel industry. In addition, he guided the Olympics from fundamental disorder to a successful conclusion.

Mike Huckabee explained that Romney gives generously of his own money, not yours or mine. He warned Americans not to accumulate too much debt for future generations. Huckabee took snipes at the power of big government by invoking how the Bill of Rights limits governmental power.

Tim Pawlenty wowed the convention by explaining that people need jobs and that government doesn’t produce jobs. Private entrepreneurs produce jobs and should be rewarded for the risks that they take.

The convention reached a crescendo when Dr. Condoleeza Rice addressed the assembly. Dr. Rice sported her own presidential timber by stating that we need free markets and the maintenance of a balance of power to preserve freedom. Chaos reigns when no one leads. She talked about the challenges of the global collapse in 2008 and the Arab Spring.

Dr. Rice went on to explain the need for American energy independence from foreign oil, as well as the alternative energies. She explained the importance of private sector growth and the benefits of small business.

Later, Dr. Rice asked that poor parents be given better choices. She closed by stating that success is not achieved by instilling resentment and fear in people. Most importantly, Dr. Rice reiterated a theme of previous speakers, saying that we cannot lose control over our finances.

Susana Martinez impressed the assemblage by stating that while governor of New Mexico, she converted a structural deficit into a surplus without raising taxes. In addition, she admonished the Obama administration for adding $5 trillion in new debt This statement reinforced an earlier introduction of the debt bomb by Mike Huckabee.

Paul Ryan did a good job of presenting himself as the vice presidential candidate. He explained that the promised recovery is nowhere in sight and that many workers cannot secure employment. He criticized the $831 billion stimulus as political patronage and corporate welfare. Ryan called for wealth creation and the return of a strong middle class. Finally, he put a number on government spending by stating that it should not go beyond 20 percent of GDP. Ryan sought to make the social safety net safe again.

Marco Rubio explained the sacrifices that had to be made so that he could
become a United States senator. His speech lead into the introduction of Mitt Romney as the presidential candidate.

Mitt Romney discussed the turnarounds and failures in his business experience.
He promised 12 million new jobs. Romney made the Obama administration accountable for the promise of hope and change in 2008. Romney explained that he will make bold initiatives in energy on all fronts, including oil and gas, coal, nuclear etc. He will make government smaller and relieve tax burdens on small business. Romney will protect Eastern European countries like Poland and deal more firmly with Russia and our trading partners to secure fair trade. The convention closed after a prayer by Timothy Cardinal Dolan of New York.

Generally, the Republican National Convention informed Americans about the Republican philosophy and approach toward governing as embodied by the Romney/Ryan ticket. Gone were the draconian calls for being tough on drugs and crime which were the hallmarks of past campaigns. Voters were left with questions as to how Romney will have less government while simultaneously spending more money to defend Eastern Europe and dealing more firmly with Russia.

In addition, the public needs to know more about how Romney will create 12 million new jobs. Will the energy area be the catalyst for job growth? Cutting taxes alone is not the answer. Stimulating consumer demand is the catalyst that leads to job growth and new hiring.

Right now, $2 trillion and more sit in overseas corporate bank accounts awaiting repatriation into the United States. When and if this money flows back, corporations will be looking for a tax break to bring this investment money to America for use in promoting industrial growth.

Voters will need more detail on how a smaller government will be achieved. Will this mean the repeal of the Patriot Act? Will cost savings in private Medicare exchanges get plowed back into the Medicare system or will the cost savings go to HMO executives in the form of bonuses? Will Romney regulate risky derivative transactions or let companies fail when intermarket forces operate in unexpected ways? These and other questions must be addressed during the upcoming October debates. Meanwhile, the Democratic National Convention will present its case next week on behalf of President Obama and a second term in office.

Powered by

About Dr Joseph S Maresca

I've taught approx. 34 sections of collegiate courses including computer applications, college algebra, collegiate statistics, law, accounting, finance and economics. The experience includes service as a Board Director on the CPA Journal and Editor of the CPA Candidates Inc. Newsletter. In college, I worked as a statistics lab assistant. Manhattan College awarded a BS in an allied area of operations research. The program included courses in calculus, ordinary differential equations, probability, statistical inference, linear algebra , the more advanced operations research, price analysis and econometrics. Membership in the Delta Mu Delta National Honor Society was granted together with the degree. My experience includes both private account and industry. In addition, I've worked extensively in the Examinations Division of the AICPA from time to time. Recently, I passed the Engineering in Training Exam which consisted of 9 hours of examination in chemistry, physics, calculus, differential equations, linear algebra, probability/ statistics, fluids, electronics, materials science/structure of matter, mechanics, statics, thermodynamics, computer science, dynamics and a host of minor subject areas like engineering economics. A very small percentage of engineers actually take and pass the EIT exam. The number has hovered at circa 5%. Several decades ago, I passed the CPA examination and obtained another license in Computer Information Systems Auditing. A CISA must have knowledge in the areas of data center review, systems applications, the operating system of the computer, disaster recovery, contingency planning, developmental systems, the standards which govern facility reviews and a host of other areas. An MBA in Accounting with an Advanced Professional Certificate in Computer Applications/ Information Systems , an Advanced Professional Certificate in Finance and an Advanced Professional Certificate in Organizational Design were earned at New York University-Graduate School of Business (Stern ). In December of 2005, an earned PhD in Accounting was granted by the Ross College. The program entrance requires a previous Masters Degree for admittance together with a host of other criteria. The REGISTRAR of Ross College contact is: Tel . US 202-318-4454 FAX [records for Dr. Joseph S. Maresca Box 646 Bronxville NY 10708-3602] The clinical experience included the teaching of approximately 34 sections of college accounting, economics, statistics, college algebra, law, thesis project coursework and the professional grading of approx. 50,000 CPA examination essays with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Additionally, membership is held in the Sigma Beta Delta International Honor Society chartered in 1994. Significant writings include over 10 copyrights in the name of the author (Joseph S. Maresca) and a patent in the earthquake sciences.
  • http://rwno.limewebs.com Not the liberal actor

    Dr. Maresca, very good article explaining the Republican philosophy. I think that one sentence you wrote says it all: “Mike Huckabee explained that Romney gives generously of his own money, not yours or mine.”

  • seancabrillo

    Romney has a secret plan for jobs, But it’s written on books of gold that no one else can see.

  • seancabrillo

    Why does no one mention that Ryan’s ‘marvelous’ speech was composed of half-truths, huge mis-representations and outrageous lies? He has the brain of George Bush and the heart of Ayn Rand.

  • http://www.lunch.com/JSMaresca-Reviews-1-1.html Dr. Joseph S. Maresca

    There are trillions of dollars in overseas bank accounts.These dollars must come back and be invested to strengthen the manufacturing and other business sectors. The baby boomers will be retiring en masse this decade. This retirement will open up millions of jobs everywhere. The global population is expanding and more people will need more services of every kind. The Patent Office has approved a record number of new inventions and this work continues. The infrastructure of roads, bridges, tunnels,rails etc.is old and needs replacement badly. I could go on and on.

  • Igor

    Huckabee explained nothing, he just made claims (Joe often uses ‘explained’, as if someone actually proved or demonstrated something, rather than ‘claimed’ which just states an unsupported assertion). To whit,

    “Mike Huckabee explained that Romney gives generously of his own money, not yours or mine.”

    Romney just gives money to his Mormon church, which is not, properly speaking, a charity. It’s actually a world-wide enterprise, like Exxon or BP, etc.

  • Glenn Contrarian

    sean –

    …and the heart of Ayn Rand.

    That’s an oxymoron if I ever saw one….

  • http://www.lunch.com/JSMaresca-Reviews-1-1.html Dr. Joseph S. Maresca

    Labor/Management relations is easier during good times. This is an aspect which should be debated in the upcoming campaign in the Fall. The hard times bring about more conflicts because there is a smaller pie. During the Great Depression, management took bonuses in the form of stock options. They were rewarded handsomely for their sacrifices after the Great Depression. Labor clearly benefits from the social safety net which government provides along with funded pensions and worker savings.

    Infrastructure is physically put into place by the toil of many workers. America’s infrastructure is in need of repair i.e. roads, rails, bridges, tunnels and waterways. Engineers, professional accountants, lawyers and others do the planning so that projects can go forward. The government facilitates the process by approving permits and sometimes participating in securing funds in the form of grants and long term financing. The government role in financing or facilitating infrastructure is another thing to be discussed in the upcoming campaign.