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Really Really Good: Dream like a King

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Martin Luther King Day celebrations took place all over America yesterday, as millions took time out of their daily routine to reflect on the man and his life.  King's dream of racial equality and harmony is one that is shared by many of us, a dream that is revisited daily in the lives of many, even if they don't notice it.  While we still have much work to do before we finally arrive at the promised land's border, we are indeed closer to that marvelous place than before.

Yesterday I had a brief conversation with a middle-aged white man, as he and his wife strolled in the park.  He looked to be in his late fifties, with salt and pepper hair on his head and laugh lines well entrenched around his smile.  His wife, who was much shorter than he was, seemed to take four steps to match his two.  As they approached the table where I was seated, I noticed she was Asian.  Her husband walked right up to me and said, "Happy Martin Luther King Weekend to you!" 

For a second, I didn't even know how to respond.  "Same to you,” I offered quickly, returning the smile and searching for something else to say.  Before I could think of anything, he continued on with his thoughts.  "You know, that man was truly one of the greatest people to ever live, and one of America's true heroes.  It really is a shame it took this long for people to acknowledge him like this and have a national holiday, but I'm glad we finally do." 

He went on to tell me of how his speeches had left such a long lasting impression on him personally, and that he was proud to say he had a chance to hear Dr. King speak twice, one being in Washington, D.C. for the march and "I Have A Dream" speech.  He looked at his wife and continued "He sure made a difference for us!' as she nodded quietly and smiled at him. 

It was truly a surreal moment for me, as I listened to this stranger tell me why MLK meant so much to him.  His memories and thoughts of King, wishes of a happy holiday, and general amazing outlook on life proved that the dream that King spoke about so many years ago is still being realized today.  Just as quickly as they had came, the couple wished me well and continued their walk. 

Happy Martin Luther King Weekend, indeed! 

 
The Cyber Mix Tape Show is back online! Our new online talk radio show took a little breather for a few weeks as we unplugged from the Matrix for a bit. Now that we are settled into our new place and starting to reconnect the system, we are ready to get back to the business at hand.

Stay tuned for some cool segments in the very near future, as I nail down some of the stuff I have floating around, and confirm some guest!  I will tell you this much: I will be giving away prizes on my show to live callers, including DVDs, books, CDs, concert tickets, magazines & website subscriptions, and more.  Live DJ sets and more are on the way on The Cyber Mix Tape Show, hosted by yours truly!

Top 3 Shows

Prop 215: War on The Compassionate Use Act

Featuring Bruce Margolin, Esq. (LA NORML)

Come Into Soul-featuring Landy Shores (RAMP)

The Listening Room-Featuring Andrew Lojero (Art Don’t Sleep ) & director Erick Voake -Co Hosted by JhaVoice & DJ Shiro

Really Really Good Events

January 25, 2008 ~ The Amin EL Collective ~ Show time 8:00 PM

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Spend this evening with us and experience the Love & Passion…

I hope to see you and yours at the show.
Be Blessed,
Amin EL
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  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    Nice piece, Laron. It is a great story that needs to be shared because I don’t think enough people realize that Dr King isn’t just an African American hero; he’s American hero, period.

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