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Predictions of Quaking ‘Neath the Streets of Rome

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As I pen these letters, May 11, 2011, I am pleased to report no massive earthquake in Rome. One has been predicted, as you may know. The prediction comes from Raffaele Bendandi, now dead some 30 years, who acquired a substantial reputation and following for predicting earthquakes. A self-styled seismologist, astronomer, and cosmologist, knighted by none other than fascist dictator Benito Mussolini, in 1927, primarily for his 1923 prediction—off by only two days—of a major quake in the Adriatic region, Bendandi has been hailed by many (non-scientists) as an earthquake predictor.

Internet techies and followers of Bendandi claim he predicted, by studying the interplay of the sun, moon, and stars, that a massive “big one” would occur under Rome, Italy, on May 11, 2011. Indeed, we are currently witnessing extraordinary celestial events. A report from the University of Texas reveals a unique alignment in the sky: beginning May 10, the planets Venus and Jupiter will be side by side, near the horizon. Mercury will be visible to the lower right of Venus (the brighter light, on the right), with the red planet, Mars, lower left of Jupiter. One source says while this lineup also happened just last year, it will “never happen again!”

Bendandi the Predictor may be less enthusiastic about the prediction for Rome, today, than are his followers and disciples; scholars say Bendandi left no record of any prediction for May of 2011. He has, though, said we will see some major seismographic activity on April 6, 2521.

The Romans aren’t waiting for 2521; they are calling in sick in droves, and many are leaving the city. Thousands of Romans are taking the day off, to spend time in parks and open areas. City employees have made the day-off call at the rate of about 18 percent.

The City of Rome has a large and perhaps superstitious Chinese population, and reports remark, “The Chinese are all gone!” The Chinese are particularly interested, we are told, in earthquakes and their prediction. In the winter of 1975, the city of Haicheng, in China, was evacuated based on reports of “unusual animal behavior” and changes in levels of groundwater. The next day, a 7.3 magnitude quake left 2,000 Chinese dead. The following year a quake that was preceded by changes in water levels killed 240,000, in Tangshan, in northeastern China.

The Chinese may have something. Prior to one of China’s worst quakes in recorded history the water level in a prominent pond fell drastically. Toads by the thousands appeared in the streets and zoo animals began strange, unusual behavior. Troublesome reports came of zebras banging their heads, elephants swinging their trunks, peacocks screeching, and lions and tigers, usually asleep at that time of day, pacing their habitats.

Geophysicist Tom Parsons, with the U.S. Geological Survey, says these signals aren’t reliable. For centuries people have tried to predict quakes, some by studying odd gaseous releases, or a variety of electrical signals. He mentions that animal behavior has been linked to quake prediction. He goes on to say none of these are reliable; earthquakes and tectonic plates interact with each other in a very chaotic system.

We are all aware of the predictions of an end to our world, coming soon. We have seen birds fall from the sky; we have seen fish and crabs dying inexplicably in large numbers. We are aware of predictions dating back to the dawn of history. As yet there is no rumbling beneath the streets of Rome; we hope that continues to be the case.

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About John Lake

John Lake had a long and successful career in legitimate and musical theater. He moved up into work behind the camera at top motion pictures. He has done a smattering of radio, and television John joined the Blogcritics field of writers owing to a passion for the liberal press, himself speaking out about the political front, and liberal issues. Now the retired Mr. Lake has entered the field of motion picture, television, and video game (now a daily gamer!) critique. His writing is always innovative and immensely readable!
  • centennial

    It’s amazing how some people can be very accurate predicting things. I know some scientist have great accuracy with the weather by watching sun flares which makes a lot of sense.

    Guess we only have a few days to see how this prediction goes.

    interesting stuff

  • John Lake

    Interesting stuff! Thank you, centennial.

  • John Lake

    It is with sadness that I mention earthquakes in southern Spain, the Town of Lorca, in which nearly every building was damaged. First, a quake measuring 4.4, then two hours later a second of 5.2 magnitude on the Richter scale (now usually just referred to as “the magnitude scale”). Nine people are dead. Most of the town’s residents have left for fear of aftershocks. Hundreds of tents have been prepared for the 3000 homeless victims of the earthquake. The alignment of planets may have contributed, although as yet there has been no report of that linking.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/dr-dreadful/ Dr Dreadful

    John, I know you love to drop your little “just sayin'” verbal grenades and don’t necessarily believe nonsense like this, but nonetheless I feel I should point out that Lorca is in the province of Murcia, Spain, which is quite conspicuously nowhere near Rome.

    A 5.4 is also by no standard a ‘big one’, and quakes of that magnitude don’t usually cause many casualties unless they hit a populated area with buildings not designed to withstand them, as happened in this instance.

    On average, our planet experiences more than 1300 earthquakes of magnitude 5.0-5.9 annually. That’s more than three a day.

    It would have been surprising if there hadn’t been a quake on May 11th. There was nothing remarkable about this one other than where it struck.

    I only hope that none of the Romans who bunked off work went to southern Spain for the day.

  • John Lake

    At no time, Doc. D., did I suggest that the earthquake in Spain was the very quake that
    Bendandi predicted. In fact, however, Lorca must not be in an area of high seismic activity, because a mid range quake ordinarily wouldn’t have done that much damage.
    You make the point, I speculate, that planetary alignment wasn’t a factor in this quake. Odd to say that I may not agree. We recall that at the time of the 9.0 quake in Japan, we, who trust the media, were told that the moon was in an ordinary position, neither near nor far. They just felt a need to mention that. Then after a few weeks, they revealed that in fact the moon was the closest it has been in years. Record close.
    I’m not going anywhere with this, I’m just looking at facts; as would Sherlock, or Monk.
    In fact, I stumbled on your comment here as I was trying to understand the flooding in the Mississippi River region. All reports agree to record rainfall, and record snow-melt. I was just about to check if the previous high peak in 1927 was in sync with solar flares. Since I mentioned several weeks ago solar flares, I sure I have your attention. I also note that the Mississippi river may make a complete and utter change of course if rainfall dictates.
    You notice no indication of “final days”, or the “end of the world”, topics which I happen to know interest you.
    I don’t know if “ground water levels” are the same type of phenomenon as major river flooding. I’m not even religious!
    Am I on your wave-length, or will you deny it? John Lake

  • Boeke

    Didn’t that TV Evangelist Harold Camping predict End Of World for this week?

  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/dr-dreadful/ Dr Dreadful

    You make the point, I speculate, that planetary alignment wasn’t a factor in this quake. Odd to say that I may not agree. We recall that at the time of the 9.0 quake in Japan, we, who trust the media, were told that the moon was in an ordinary position, neither near nor far. They just felt a need to mention that. Then after a few weeks, they revealed that in fact the moon was the closest it has been in years. Record close.

    Sorry, John, that’s incorrect. The moon was close to apogee at the time of the Japan quake.

    If planetary alignment or the proximity of the moon were much of a factor in earthly events, then we’d be witnessing constant havoc as tides ripped through the crust.

    The Bad Astronomer, Phil Plait, demolishes the moon-caused-the-earthquake theory very handily here.

    I was just about to check if the previous high peak in 1927 was in sync with solar flares. Since I mentioned several weeks ago solar flares, I sure I have your attention.

    As I’m sure you know, John, correlation does not equal causation. Let me know what you find out about 1927.

  • John Lake

    The “supermoon” on March 19 was closer to the Earth than it has been in 18 years. The near point in the elliptical orbit is called a lunar perigee. The March 19 wasn’t just a “supermoon”, it was an “extreme supermoon”, according to one expert. But Phil Plait say’s that has nothing to do with the earthquake of Friday, March 11. Maybe he just knows that. Or maybe he’s one of those goody-two-shoes who want to protect the people of the world from information that might cause panic.
    What we need here is a worldwide movement to NOT hide the news that will panic the people. “Bring it on!” as Bush said. I think it was Bush. We should insist they just TELL US EVERYTHING!
    Maybe people will quit their jobs, kids won’t go to school, folks will spend their life savings (ON BOOZE!)… At least the media won’t get that superior feeling that they’re PROTECTING US!
    Like, who needs it?!

  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/dr-dreadful/ Dr Dreadful

    But Phil Plait say’s that has nothing to do with the earthquake of Friday, March 11. Maybe he just knows that.

    Or maybe he bothered to check the science to a greater extent than you bothered to read his article.

    What we need here is a worldwide movement to NOT hide the news that will panic the people. “Bring it on!” as Bush said. I think it was Bush. We should insist they just TELL US EVERYTHING!

    You’re not related to Heloise, by any chance, are you?

  • John Lake

    But really, Doc… who needs it?!!! Call it orb-oo-phobia. Fear of the orb that lights the night! Sort of a wolfman thing!!
    Who’s Heloise?

  • zingzing

    heloise is a woman who blogs and comments around here who believes she a) is jfk reborn and b) influences everything. she’s quite insane. i have no idea why dd is referencing her in relation to you, but it can’t be a good thing. might want to back off of prophecy at this point.

  • http://cinemasentries.com/ El Bicho

    zing, a) is not exactly correct as they were both alive at the same time

  • zingzing

    el b, crazy does not need to be logically sound.

  • http://cinemasentries.com/ El Bicho

    zing, what I meant, but didn’t clearly state, was she doesn’t consider herself “jfk reborn” as you have written.

  • zingzing

    just jfk then? meh. it makes no difference.

  • Boeke

    Whew! We’ve got a few days left to repent:

    Camping

    “Still, according to Rapture doctrine, most people will barely notice that Judgment Day has gone by. That’s because May 21 is, according to Camping, the day when only the righteous will be saved and taken to heaven. Everyone else, on the other hand, will have to remain on Earth for a period of torment. The real fire and brimstone show, Camping further predicts, will get under way in October.”

  • John Lake

    #16
    Then, on May, say, 22nd, it’ll be like, “look around..”
    A guy can’t win — anyway you look at it.
    Here’s something. Loyola University Professor Catherine Wessinger says Camping’s predictions reflect an uncertainty with the economy.

    Who’s going to believe that???!!!

  • Boeke

    Only a week to go, according to Camping, so I’m making my End Of Time plans: I upgraded my wine selections to BeauCastel and Sancerre, maybe some Rose d’Anjou.

  • John Lake

    I should never comment. I invariably mess up. #13: Who’s Heloise?
    Oh. You mean Heloise the BlogCritics person. I was thinking of some silliness from the morning newspaper which I never read. That is, I read the paper, but I don’t read Heloise. The newspaper Heloise.

  • John Lake

    May 21, 1:45 PM Chicago time. Nothing yet!

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