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Polls Versus Reality: Silent Racism DOES Exist And McCain’s Counting On It

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We are less than four weeks away from electing our next president and many news outlets are voicing a concern many Democrats are too fearful to look at closely: silent racism. Conservative pundits and news outlets are trying to pretend it doesn't exist, with headlines like "Don't Assume That A Vote Against Obama Is Racist" or "Get Ready For Cries Of Racism At Every Turn."

But don't assume that a vote against Obama isn't racist, either, because it may be just that.

The campaign has been a difficult road for both Senators John McCain and Barack Obama, and what had been a relatively dignified race came to a screeching halt when John McCain chose Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his running mate.

Regardless of what anyone might think of Sarah Palin, the vetting process, or her qualifications to be vice president, one glaring fact about this selection is clear: she's meant to polarize.

Palin represents a very small but vocal percentage of the conservative vote. She's a fervent pro-lifer, card-carrying NRA member, and Christian who believes in a strict interpretation of the Bible. McCain, on the other hand, represents the Ronald Reagan-era conservatives who brought the Republican ticket back to prominence before the evangelists got a hold of it thanks to Jerry Falwell. Honestly, if you were to really look at the two parties, the current Republican agenda is much closer to the Dixiecrats agenda from 60 years ago.

Barack ObamaNow don't get me wrong, I am not suggesting that modern Republicans, or even Christian conservatives think segregation is right (although some certainly do), but there is definitely a generation gap going on, and we are at the crossroads. The reason the Democrats have been pushing so hard for the youth vote is obvious: the youth vote is more open-minded and less prejudiced, and I mean that in the classic definition of the term.

Clearly a person's vote for a candidate does NOT indicate inherent racism. A certain number of Americans will vote for John McCain because they are Republicans and he's the Republican candidate. I am also sure there are some die-hard Hillary Clinton fans who will vote for McCain because they are bitter. There are a number of fence-sitters/independents out there who are trying very hard to discern who the best candidate is, and I applaud those folks – their task is not enviable.

So that leaves us with people who like what Obama says, feel he's the most qualified, want a change in leadership, but simply can't bring themselves to vote for a black man.

I know this for a fact, because I have spoken to these people.

But wait, let me back up a second. These aren't what you'd consider bigots, racists or Klan members. These aren't people who wouldn't allow their kids to have black friends, nor refuse to work with black people, or who EVEN have black friends themselves. These are regular, hard-working, contributing members of society who just can't seem to wrap their minds around the fact that a "black man" might be President of the United States.

Think I am kidding? Here's a true story:

I know of a person (third party) who even suggested that having a black president would empower black people to become more, well, black. I can't even fathom what that means, but according to the person who told me about this, when she questioned the logic of this otherwise respectable and decent person, her reason was essentially a deep-seated fear that if Barack Obama becomes president this will legitimize black people's sense of superiority over whites causing some kind of universal shift in the status quo.

Just let that sink in and wash over you. I know, it's crazy, unless of course, this describes you.

This individual happens to be a fence-sitter who has voted Republican, but is now disillusioned with that party. She concedes that Barack Obama's suggested policies and plans are better for our future, she concedes that Sarah Palin is unacceptable and unqualified for the position as VP, not to mention, is WAY too conservative to appeal to most Americans who are, statistically speaking, moderates. But she just can't wrap her mind around a black man being the President.

So, if there are enough of these types of voters who are reluctant, but willing, to articulate their deep, silent racism, imagine how many more are out there who tell pollsters, "Sure, I like Obama," but won't be able to bring themselves to vote for him simply because of his skin color. Sadly, the above story is one of several I know, with variations on the theme, but with the same outcome.

In the last week or so, we've seen an even greater slide into mud-slinging by the McCain campaign, with Senator McCain enlisting his wife Cindy and running mate Sarah Palin to do his dirty work. By invoking the names of radical left wingers from decades ago or Obama's affiliations with politically outspoken pastors, Cindy and Sarah are subconsciously painting a picture of the stereotypical "angry black man". Why? Simply put, they are desperate to halt the impending wave of voters deciding Obama will bring the necessary change needed to stop the bleeding in the U.S.

McCain, who abandoned his promise to run a "clean" campaign when he chose to employ Rovian-style tactics beginning with his VP nomination, has run out of options. McCain knows his only hope is to scare those swing voters — like the person I described above — into sticking with the status quo.

That doesn't mean McCain is a racist, or his wife Cindy, or even hockey mom Sarah Palin. But it does mean McCain and his advisers know that there's still an invisible line in America and, with the right amount of fear-mongering, they might be able to tip the balance in their favor. Let's face it, despite what the polls show, this race will be tight. There are pockets in this country who can't see that Barack Obama, regardless of what you might think of his policies or efforts, is a black man who has transcended race.

Fortunately, Barack and his camp know this and they have a few cards up their sleeve too. Michelle Obama revealed this last night during her interview with Larry King:

King: How do you react when people talk about the Tom Bradley effect? Tom Bradley was mayor of Los Angeles [and was black]. He ran for governor of California. The polls had him 65 percent. I think he was practicing his acceptance speech and he lost. And the Bradley factors become people who were afraid to say [in polls], 'I'm against a black.' Do you fear that here? An anti-black vote?

Obama: People talk about it all the time. But it's theoretical in the case of this election. Because –

King: But you have a past case to look at.

Obama: But also, look where we are, Larry. Barack Obama is the Democratic nominee. If there was going to be a Bradley effect, if it was going to be in play, Barack wouldn't be the nominee. We have to focus on the country as it is. That was several decades ago. And I think that there's been growth and movement. Now, there will be people who will never vote for Barack Obama. But, there will be people who will never vote for John McCain, either. I think right now, people are so focused on what is the fate of our country, not just here domestically, but internationally. And I just believe that the issues are going to weigh in people's hearts more so as they go into the voting booths this time around, than anything else.

I, like the Obamas, believe enough people will search their hearts and take a leap of faith against the status quo. Because the status quo is just more of the same, and I don't know about you, but I have had enough of that.

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About Dawn Olsen

  • http://ruvysroost.blogspot.com Ruvy

    Dawn,

    The amusing thing bout all of this is that Barry Obama is a black man by skin color, but a white man by culture and upbringing. Indeed, for all of his negative traits, he is very much a citizen of the world, a fellow in the mold of Bill Clinton in some ways.

    Those who fear his skin color can’t see that fact. There are plenty of good reasons not to vote for Obama if you are an American – any disciple of Saul Alinsky is a fellow to be kept out of the Oval Office at any cost, unless you really want to see change – of the worst kind – overtake your country.

    But whatever the other reasons are not to elect Barry Obama, race is not one of them.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    I totally disagree with you Ruvy. While Saul Alinsky may have had radical ideas, his underlying principle of bringing power to the masses is a good one. I’d say it’s safe to assume that Obama isn’t a radical who advocates violence as a means to an end.

    Also, by identifying a person as either or white or black, as you have in your comment, you are depriving that person of the rich entities of both. Obama is in many ways the ideal individual to bring about change in America, as he can identify with both the minority class and the majority.

    I know some radical loonies think this makes him the anti-Christ or what have you, but I choose to think this makes him the right man at the right time. I am not one those panty-creamer Obamaites who loses their mind in his presence. I just appreciate intelligence, a calm nature and a novel thinker.

    Imagine that.

  • Dan

    “The amusing thing bout all of this is that Barry Obama is a black man by skin color, but a white man by culture and upbringing.”

    Not accurate at all. Unlike any of his policy positions, Barry makes it clear in his autobiographical writings that he embraces a strict black identity, and all the victimhood he can glom onto, despite his privileged upbringing.

    Those whites who personally reject the notion that todays blacks have a legitimate claim to victimhood after decades of black privilege through white dispossession, will certainly vote their interests in November.

    The “Bradley effect” is mostly a measure of the coercive conditioning whites have had to endure while a politically corrected society struggles to make an egalitarian principle a reality.

    Whether they are right or wrong, more than a few whites have realized, sometimes just through experiences of sheer economic survival, that they must profess one thing in public, and believe another in private.

    A pollster is public, and a voting booth is private.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/dan_miller Dan(Miller)

    Ruvy,

    Once again, we agree on something. It would be absurd and un-American to vote against Senator Obama because he is Black. I have made that point in several articles here on BC, and firmly believe it. Here is one of them. There are others.

    Some will doubtless do so, regardless.

    What I found conspicuously absent from the present article is the notion that there may well a far higher percentage of Blacks who will vote for Senator Obama for the simple reason that he is Black. That is, to my mind, no less disgraceful. Racism is racism is racism. White racism is no better, and no worse, than Black racism.

    There are many reasons to vote for Senator Obama and, for that matter Senator McCain, which far transcend race. The article mentions a few of the latter in passing, but essentially ignores them. They are viable, and transcend race.

    OK. Here is my politically biased spiel. Senator Obama has been far from forthcoming about his associations, past, present and possibly future, with Mr. Ayers, ACORN, et al. Sure, he has, to a minor extent, thrown Mr. Ayers and has other dubious associates “under the bus,” but neither forcefully nor with effect. Senator McCain has been quite candid about his past derelictions, including his (quite minor, I think) involvement in the Keating problem years ago. When he behaved less than appropriately, he has acknowledged it. He did so because of his concept of honor.

    I just finished reading two books about Senator McCain, Robert Timberg’s John McCain, An American Odyssey and Senator McCain’s book, co authored with Mark Salter, Faith of My Fathers. The theme of both comes through loud and clear: Duty, Honor and Country. Somehow, I find these concepts missing in Senator Obama.

    Merely being a POW for five years no more qualifies Senator McCain to become President than did George Washington standing up in a rowboat crossing the Delaware River. However, crossing the Delaware River was not George Washington’s only qualification, and simply being a POW is not Senator McCain’s only qualification. There was more to George Washington than that, and there is more to Senator McCain than that. Among other things, Senator McCain’s behavior as a POW is an important factor. Again, Duty, Honor, Country.

    Read Senator Obama’s autobiographical work. Read the cited books by and about Senator McCain. Then make up your mind. I ask no more. This seems, to me, to be a modest and reasonable request.

    Dan(Miller)

  • Baronius

    The strongest evidence this article puts forward is a friend of a friend. Well, I know someone whose cousin said that the Richard Gere story is true.

    This article is terrible.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Yes, Baronius, I am NOT going to out people who were candid in their discussions. Not everyone is proud of their racism, intentional or otherwise.

    I mean really, it’s an opinion piece, not a friggin news article. Oh and your comment is terrible. Possibly the worst.

    As for Obama’s associations, well, I don’t have any real problem with those individuals viewpoints. People who question the powers that be are ok in my book. Far as I know, Obama’s never been accused even remotely of engaging in or advocating violence to achieve objectives.

    Albert Einstein helped in the creation of the atomic bomb, but I don’t think anyone considers him a terrorist.

    Now that the polls show Obama’s lead is growing even greater, McNasty is resorting to have “surrogates” bring up Barack’s past drug use. Like they have any room to talk. Cindy McCain was a walking pharmacy. I’d say talking candidly in a BOOK about what you did as a teenager is being forthcoming, not so much with McCain camp.

    Let’s talk about McCain crashing three jets, or leaving his crippled wife, or humping anything that moved, or graduating at the bottom of his class.

    Do the conservatives have any dignity left or has it been robbed in the last 8 years as you’ve watched your chosen leader W ruin this country, lie to the people, and destroy our children’s future. The legacy of the great Ronald Reagan has een flushed down the toilet because of a bunch of bigoted evangelicals.

    Or how bitter the pill must be to swallow.

    I won’t rub it in your faces any more, I will take the high road. Like Barack Obama has the last six months. You people have my pity.

  • bliffle

    Good article, Dawn.

    This, paricularly, is well said:

    “So that leaves us with people who like what Obama says, feel he’s the most qualified, want a change in leadership, but simply can’t bring themselves to vote for a black man.”

    Yes. I’ve encountered such people in the past few months. It always sets me back on my heels, because some of those people are my friends. And they will insist that they are not racist.

    They seem not to even regard their position as peculiar, or notable in any way.

    It implies that, after all the other considerations, race is really the most important thing.

  • Dan

    “I won’t rub it in your faces any more, I will take the high road. Like Barack Obama has the last six months. You people have my pity.”

    that’s OK. There are still a lot of us Bush supporters who are relatively happy with his job performance. Certainly, we don’t need pity from the misguided, easily herded, Obama worshipers.

    If Obama wins, it will be tragic, but conservatism will survive and be vindicated. Of course it will be a lot harder on all, but that’s the price we pay for collective stupidity.

  • http://www.indyboomer46.blogspot.com Baritone

    Obama never lived a privileged life as a child, unless you mean a black child living a middle class life is “privileged.”

    Dan is obviously drawn to all the old school ra-ra bullshit. If John McCain lived by a “duty, honor, country” code, it is painfully obvious he has abandoned it now. He has become a total sleaze bag. His campaign is morally bankrupt (and, I understand, on its way to financial bankruptcy as well.) There is NO honor in his campaign. It is now banking on creating an element of fear and distrust by innuendo. And the basis of it is racial. More and more McCainsters are openly stating their belief that Obama is a terrorist and that he is “foreign” in some way.

    As noted above, there is no evidence – none – nada – that Obama has adopted any anti-American beliefs or any tendancies to violence. Is he a left winger? Yeah, I’d say so. Last time I looked that’s not illegal in this country. I know all conservatives would like to follow Ann Coulter’s suggestion that ALL Democrats should be arrested and tried for treason.

    As to the article, what is now refered to as the “Bradley effect” is a real concern. I would love to see Obama’s numbers nationally rise above a level that would likely be accounted for by the Bradley effect. That probably won’t happen, though, unless McCain continues to self destruct.

    McCain has no business being president. Not only has he sold his soul, but he has become spiteful, erratic and obnoxiously condescending.

    I know that all you conservatives count most of those as positive characteristics. Well, that’s largely the difference between the right and the left. McCain’s small mind is largely reflective of those of his following.

    B

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    Dan,

    what dictionary are you using because you don’t appear to understand the terms you are using. Blacks voting for Obama strictly because he’s black isn’t racism. They are not doing it because they feel superior to whites. They are doing it because they can see Obama would identify more with their life experiences.

    I admittedly have no proof, but I would bet my life that if given the chance, Obama would have voted for honoring MLK with a national holiday unlike the allegedly honorable John McCain. If you can’t see that, then I don’t know why you think any of them would care about what you find disgraceful.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    “There are still a lot of us Bush supporters who are relatively happy with his job performance.”

    Speaking of “collective stupidity.”

  • http://ruvysroost.blogspot.com Ruvy

    While Saul Alinsky may have had radical ideas, his underlying principle of bringing power to the masses is a good one.

    Dawn, I’m a socialist. I don’t have trouble with Alinsky’s ideas. But your husband is an entrepreneur and a businessman. He might. For me, Obama is just what the doctor ordered, for reasons that benefit me in Israel. But those reasons do not benefit you at all.

    Also, by identifying a person as either or white or black, as you have in your comment, you are depriving that person of the rich entities of both.

    In the doctor’s office a couple of months ago,. I read an article about Obama’s mother. From it, it was clear that he was raised as a white kid with white values in a multi-racial society (Hawaii).

    But it was also clear that unlike most of us, he is truly a citizen of the world, which has lots of advantages over being from any particular race.

    Obviously, as an adult, he has embraced a black identity. And it has been particularly effective in helping him in politics. But it’s the stuff you get as a kid that usually rules your mind and heart in the end.

    And finally, Dawn, Obama is very intelligent. But considering the types who hang with him, I’d say that his intelligence is a lot more dangerous than you can perceive.

  • bliffle

    The argument that blacks voting for blacks is as much racism as whites voting against blacks is a popular one. In fact, I used to use it myself.

    But this is a unique instance. I bet a lot of people just want to get past this point in the history of racism and see Obama as a fit person to carry the ball. He seems ordinary, non-racist, not even really black. And maybe he can even do the job. After Bush he could look pretty good.

    I bet more whites will vote for Obama because he is black than will blacks.

  • Paul

    A budding excuse for losing an election? This race would be far more interesting and significant if it were Palin-McCain vs Obama-Biden. I would be the first to admit that Palin has not put enough OJT(on job training) to be president—but neither has Obama. Her rhetoric, which is very good and folksy, has not earned her a place at the top of the Presidential ticket and Obama is no exception. The top of the ticket is the thing and it’s McCain and Biden who have put in the appropriate OJT. Think Experience! Hillary would have been a slam dunk for the Dems as I now think back. Too late. There are not enough white racist to overcome the minority vote (Black+Hispanic+Asian, Americans) + white Democrats. So this would be a whopper of an excuse.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/diana_hartman diana hartman

    after all the race rhetoric i’ve heard, it’s a wonder there isn’t a bumper sticker that says “If Only Obama Were White…”

    the ongoing division (overt or covert) is further evidence that we are not a melting pot…we are not a blender drink or a glob of non-color that came about by way of mixing paints…we are all pieces of a puzzle, and no one piece changes even as it is placed in the picture…rather it enhances and contributes to the completeness of the picture…so what if there are a bunch of edge pieces that refuse to join in and would rather stick with each other…let them stay out there somewhere…at least we know where they are…

    i rather like it when some dumbass suggests a black president would lead to some kind of black revolt and/or black superiority over whites…it gives me a chance to pull out my white trash argument…for all the white presidents we’ve had, not a one of them got all of our white trash off the couch or out of the bar…lazy, uneducated people with few teeth and an uncanny ability to procreate will always be that way (and probably not even vote) – regardless of race, creed or color…

  • Doug Hunter

    Wow, leftist garbage keeping the race war alive to garner votes. Very sad. Making blanket accusations of anyone who votes against Obama as racist… also a new low.

    If it were Republicans stopoing to this level you’d see how sick and evil it was. Unfortunately, most people are so stupid they simply cannot see the dirty tricks being pulled by their side, or like the author of this piece, actively participate in them.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    I am going to try and remain calm in the midst of some these laughable accusations from the right. Clearly, you are angry. I understand, I was angry the last 8 years too, it’s difficult to watch your country go into the crapper at the hands of president you did not elect. Lucky for you, if Obama is elected, at least it won’t happen without a fight.

    Ruvy, I get where you are coming from, but you are trying to divorce democracy from capitalism and they are one in the same. If the majority of the people want to try something new and they are given the opportunity to implement it, that’s progress. I don’t think you have to be “conservative” to be a business person or entrepreneur, you can care about the people and democracy, while still providing for your family. They are not mutually exclusive, and in fact, work better when done in concert.

    It’s kind of the founding principles of this country. And those conservatives who wanted to keep all the power, are now doling out socialism in compact billion dollar handouts.

    One final note, if people really, truly, honestly believe that silent racism doesn’t exist, or has no baring on this election process, that’s some blinding ignorance right there.

    It does NOT however mean that Obama won’t still win, it just means we haven’t come as far as a society as we should have.

    For every person who is afraid of a “black” man being in charge, there are people like myself who are more than willing to give a qualified person a chance to make a change. And I happen to believe the opposite from the person I cited in this story. What better way to cut racism charges at its knees than to put a man who is perceived as black in the most important position in the world.

    The implications of the global and social impact this could have are innumerable, and from my perspective having that man be Obama, all positive.

  • Cindy D

    Great article dawn!

    So, if there are enough of these types of voters who are reluctant, but willing, to articulate their deep, silent racism, imagine how many more are out there who tell pollsters, “Sure, I like Obama,” but won’t be able to bring themselves to vote for him simply because of his skin color he’s associated with a terrorist.

    It’s handy to smear someone with the “terrorist” brand, then say things like they don’t see America like you and I do. It gives a convenient out to those who were uncomfortable with his race and can now refuse to vote for him for some other reason.

  • Cindy D

    To those who think it’s racist for blacks to vote for Obama, simply because he’s black:

    I’m not sure how fair of a measure that is. We’d have to see if “simply because he’s black” is even a valid variable. This presumes these voters don’t know anything else about Obama (like his positions, even in their most summary form, which seem to make a lot of sense to black voters). I think you need to throw Thomas Sowell up there instead and see how many votes he’d get.

  • Clavos

    I think you need to throw Thomas Sowell up there instead and see how many votes he’d get.

    He’d get mine in a heartbeat.

  • Cindy D

    Clav,

    Sorry, your vote wouldn’t count. :-)

  • Clavos

    It never does, Cindy.

  • http://www.futonreport.net/ Matthew T. Sussman

    So is “silent racism” where someone makes a video mocking Obama, followed by full screen subtitles?

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/dan_miller Dan(Miller)

    Here is an interesting link to a video containing comments by Louis Farrakhan. Here is another link just in case the first one gets pulled.

    Dan(Miller)

  • Lisa Solod Warren

    Dawn, i wrote two such opinion pieces here at blogcritics weeks ago and was castigated for them, too. I actually spoke to real voters (some of whom were Democrats who were having a hard time voting for Obama solely because he was black) and looked at the real polls that has just come out highlighting my state of Virginia… People still don’t want to talk about race openly and people still have a hard time believing that the U.S. has racists, open ones or those who say they aren’t but may well go into the voting booth and be unable to pull the lever for a black man, no matter what they tell a pollster. The subject came up again last night at synagogue when a well-meaning but naive young man said that he could not believe some of his relatives (he is a new convert) told him that they could not vote for Obama because he was a black man.

    As I said in one of my articles, I grew up in the South and was subject to much anti-Semitism, which some people still refuse to believe when I tell them.

    But listen, listen, to what is happening now. Listen to Sarah Palin stirring up the old stuff about Obama being a Muslim, a terrorist. Hear people being interviewed say that he IS a terrorist because of his “name” and his “heritage.” Hear right ring radio hosts say that Obama will “start a race war” simply by running for president.

    Hear the hate, the fear, the confusion… the sheer ignorance, which is what I have been writing about for months now. And know that there is no underestimating some people’s ability to be swayed by ugliness and their own innate fear of the unknown.

    We WANT to believe all Americans are good people and we are better than the rest of the world–those awful ugly middle easterners and the the cowardly French and so on and so forth (and some people do) but people are people and there are stupid, ugly, ignorant people everywhere who will act without thinking, boo and hiss and shout out terrible things in a crowd and follow someone just because he or she says something that makes them feel superior for a moment.

    This race and the McCain/Palin horrorific nastiness of the past few weeks has highlighted more than anything how truly ignorant people can be. And that, more than anything, may turn this race into a race ABOUT race.

    When it needs to be about so much more.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/diana_hartman diana hartman

    soooo, if david duke waxed as poetic about mccain as farrakhan has about obama, and mccain did anything to distance himself from duke, but the left didn’t think it was enough, then would that mean mccain was still associated with, responsible for and accountable to the things duke said?

    ‘cos if not, dan’s whole farrakhan-obama connection is unraveled like a rope that’s been left to dangle from a tree for the past 40 years…

  • Lee Richards

    If Obama were white, he would have had a consistent double-digit lead in the polls, so race is one factor in the election.

    Racism, though, won’t decide this election. Obama’s campaign has put together a coalition of diverse elements–white, minorities, women, young people, liberals, independents, unions, etc.–against a currently unpopular president and party that McCain represents.

    I live in Virginia, former capital of the confederacy, once segregated top-to-bottom, where blacks were systematically disenfranchised until the 1960s, and a consistent red-state in presidential elections since 1964.

    So what happeened when a black Democrat ran for governor here? He was elected, the first elected black governor in any state. Doug Wilder put together a solid coalition to win. He couldn’t have won without the support of white(southern)voters that he convinced to ignore his race and join his coalition.

    If racism couldn’t defeat a black candidate in a smaller venue where its effects would be magnified and greater, its influence is likely to be diluted among the more diverse popultion of the whole country.

    The ecomonic issues today are color blind, and voters will primarily be casting ballots to 1)choose someone they think may be able to come up with some original and workable solutions, and 2) punish anybody they can for allowing the mess to happen.

  • http://drdreadful.blogspot.com Dr Dreadful

    Ruvy, I get where you are coming from, but you are trying to divorce democracy from capitalism and they are one in [sic] the same.

    That’s not quite true. It’s perfectly possible to have capitalism without democracy. Look to China for the most obvious modern case, but even a cursory examination of history will yield countless examples.

    There’s a much better case, though, for arguing that you can’t have true democracy without capitalism.

  • http://www.idiotwars.com Dave Nalle

    I agree that racism may be a factor in people voting against Obama, but my perception of it is rather different from what I keep seeing from the left.

    Like Dawn, Lisa and others, I’ve talked to a lot of voters. The mild expressions of racism I’ve seen have pretty much universally come from Democratic or independent voters and almost never from Republicans or voters on the right. Those who oppose Obama most strongly seem to oppose him primarily on an ideological basis. Those who oppose him on the basis of race seem more likely to agree with him ideologically, but are just uncomfortable with him for vague reasons which include race at least subconsciously.

    I see a peculiar form of racism in play here. Sure there are some hardcare racists out there, but they are small in number and easy to write off as irrelevant. They’re going to vote insanely and for stupid reasons no matter who is running. The racism which really matters comes from people who basically are NOT racist in their normal life, but when put on the spot and having to make a decision, a mild subliminal racism surfaces in the form of wavering and doubt.

    If the Republicans had nominated someone more ideological than McCain these people would have bitten the bullet and voted for Obama, but subscribing to a generally moderate political philosophy and perhaps nudged by a very mild and unacknolwedged uneasiness about race they shy away from Obama and move towards McCain because he seems like a viable alternative.

    I hate to see the GOP which was founded on opposition to racist policy and which has championed liberty for all minorities benefit from this, but they and McCain do appear to be unintended beneficiaries of cultural squeamishness. In any other situation I don’t think it would be a big issue, but in this highly contentious election it does seem to make a difference.

    That difference will come when those moderate and uneasy voters, many of whom may have previously professed support for Obama, find themselves in the privacy of the voting booth and pull the lever for McCain on a momentary impulse driven by a lingering doubt that those who are so inclined can certainly class as racism.

    Dave

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/dan_miller Dan(Miller)

    Re comments # 24 and 26: I made no comment on the video other than that it is interesting, as I think it is. Make of it what, if anything, you wish.

    Dan(Miller)

  • http://www.indyboomer46.blogspot.com Baritone

    Doug,

    “Making blanket accusations of anyone who votes against Obama as racist…”

    I don’t believe anyone here said that. At issue are “closet” racists who say one thing and vote another. It’s happened before and will likely happen this time.

    This notion that racism is no longer a viable issue in this country is ludicrous. Certainly, it is less rampant, less overt than in years past, but it still exists and will doubtless have an effect on the presidential vote come November 4th.

    I still see people flying the “stars and bars” from flag poles in their yards, and/or having “stars and bars” license plates. I hear people talking about the election in public places with many stating loud and proud how they’d “never vote for no n….r!”
    Just a few days ago I heard a fellow in a local restaurant exclaim hotly that he won’t vote for “that darky Obama because he’s a muslim and a terrorist.”

    I, too, don’t see how one could consider blacks voting for Obama as racist. Even if it is, can you blame them? Any people who have lived essentially under the thumb of a distinctly separate and abusive ruling class for what is now over 300 years – over half that time as literal slaves – would hardly be considered remiss if they stood up and cheered in support of one of their own in Obama’s position.

    But for most, I doubt that it stops there. To believe that it does is just another slap in the face of black citizens who make their decisions no less intelligently than the rest of us. To some, that may not be saying much, but it does serve to reinforce the essence of equality due people of all races, cultural and ethnic backgrounds in this country – even Arabs and Muslims.

    Further, it is my opinion that the tactics taken on by McCain/Palin against Obama are dangerous. The verbal responses from some of their audiences reveal a level of hatred and disdain that is being further inflamed by the accusations coming from the Rep candidates. I guess they figure that McCain will be a shoo-in if Obama winds up dead.

    B

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Lee I hope and pray you are right on your last two statements.

    As I watch the stock market plummet and the broad ripple effect it is having on global markets and domestic financial markets I sense fear. People are starting to panic and the fever pitch is becoming palpable. McCain and Palin are doing an incredible, but despicable job of preying on people’s insecurities right now.

    We have three or so weeks to go and I predict with great certainty the McCain camp will sink to levels we thought unimaginable in modern times. I may sound like a paranoid loon, but the McCain/Palin ticket, with the help of the fear-mongering right will do ANYTHING they can to stay in power.

    They know that a paradigm shift will occur should Obama become our next president and if they interject enough panic with the growing uncertainty they might be able to squeak out a win.

    Americans must remain focused and not allow themselves to be distracted from their jobs of picking the BEST leader for these troubling times.

    We need new, fresh and well-thought out ideas and leadership, not more fear, scare tactics and boogeymen.

    McCain, should he win or lose, will look back at this in his dying days (and in his case in the not to distant future) and feel tremendous shame for what he has done. Not only is he destroying his reputation and dignity, but in the process, trying to destroy another man’s. I hope he can live with himself when all is said in done, because I know he knows that the path he has chosen was not putting “country first” but himself first.

    That’s not patriotic, that’s just the same selfishness and greed we’ve seen destroy this country — and now potentially — the world.

  • Clavos

    500000000

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Dave Nalle said:

    The mild expressions of racism I’ve seen have pretty much universally come from Democratic or independent voters and almost never from Republicans or voters on the right. Those who oppose Obama most strongly seem to oppose him primarily on an ideological basis. Those who oppose him on the basis of race seem more likely to agree with him ideologically, but are just uncomfortable with him for vague reasons which include race at least subconsciously.

    Dave you just made my case for me. If you read what I wrote, my concern for racism in this campaign wasn’t from Republicans. They weren’t going to vote for Obama anyway. My concern is the undecided/swing/independent voter who is susceptible to hearing Obama’s plan and message and liking it, but as easily susceptible to silent cues and undertones of racism.

    I have a relative who I love dearly and would never consider themselves a racist who basically said what you said above “vague reasons” which could be subconsciously racist. So the next question I would like conservatives and Rep. to ask themselves is “If we figured out that subconsciously some people might be a bit racist and afraid to vote for Obama, do you think McCain’s campaign advisers haven’t figured that out as well.”

    As Captain Jack Sparrow might say, “We are agreed in principle, now we are just haggling over the price.”

    Seriously, is there anyone out there savvy in politics who genuinely thinks McCain and Co. aren’t playing to those “subconscious vagaries” in swing voters minds when they mention “terrorist, Muslim” and my new favorite, “that one.”

    We are all scared for our future, but that simply means we must be more diligent and thoughtful than ever. Panic mode is NOT what we need.

    McCain, whom until about 5 weeks ago I could have lived with as president, has lost my respect, and likely his own. Which may explain his bizarre behavior.

  • maskay

    Economically, things stink right now. But I think the author goes off on a tangent from her point to go on a bush bashing trip. It takes away from her credability. And her opinion on Sarah Palin is evident. Was Biden even mentioned in this article?

    As for the economy, I think there is enough blame to go around. But I think its unfair to put all the blame on a president, regardless of party. Congress has a roll in this also, as do world events. It’s amazing that this decline didn’t happen after 9-11, and it took this long. Economies go up. And then down. And this one will go up again, regardless of who sits in the oval office.

    Couple things to think about—the large company I work for began having trouble, and first round of layoffs, in March of 2001. The industry I was in as a whole was having problems. Was the GWB’s fault, 3 months in?

    The 10 cities with the highest poverty rates in the nation have been controlled by the same party for years (Detroit, Buffalo NY, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Miami,St. Louis, El Paso, Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Newark.) What conclusion can be drawn from that?

  • Arch ConservativeWith each passing day it looks more and more like Eight Ball Barry is going to be o

    “I bet more whites will vote for Obama because he is black than will blacks.”

    If you’re talking raw numbers I agree. There are a lot of moronic moonbats out there itching to pat themselves on the back.

    If we’re talking percentages you’re dead wrong. There is a silver linging in that for conservatives like myself though. After four years of Barry’s horribly unAmerican socialist leadership the nation will be itching for a fire breathing conservative, capitalist loving Republican in 2012.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    #35

    I didn’t mention Bush much at all, he and his administration are old news. I am concerned with the next president. That’s of greater importance. If you wish to debate whether Bush was a great president, or is responsible for many of our current crises, that’s a debate you will have to have on your own.

    Bush is no longer relevant.

  • Lori

    Well written Dawn. Nail on the head.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    #36, Your horns are showing. Better put those away before your scare the innocent people who want the world to be a better place for everyone, not just the “privileged few” the conservatives think deserve it.

    In lighter news, Halloween’s just around the corner, good thing too. We will need all the candy we can get to sweeten the bitter bile building up in those “red” states.

  • Clavos

    maskay,

    Miami is and has been, since a few years after the Cubans arrived, a Republican town; for years, three of our four congressclowns have been Republicans.

  • http://marksaleski.com Mark Saleski

    Your horns are showing

    those aren’t horns, they’re bolts.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    “As Captain Jack Sparrow might say,”

    I believe that’s one of (George Bernard) Shaw’s.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Possibly EB, but I know Capt. Jack uttered it too ;)

  • zingzing

    dave: “I hate to see the GOP which was founded on opposition to racist policy and which has championed liberty for all minorities benefit from this, but they and McCain do appear to be unintended beneficiaries of cultural squeamishness.”

    you think that the gop (as smart as they are at winning elections,) is getting ANY unintended effects? do you really think that, what with the republican party’s largely white base, they’re really going to let obama’s race play absolutely no role in their strategy? come on, dave. that would be a monumental mistake. for their own good, they have to use it. and they have been. if you think otherwise, you’re blind (and stupid).

    that said, the dems are using obama’s race as well. but there are no unintended effects. that much is obvious.

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Don’t think the Conservatives are angry and inciting fear and hatred. The quote below says it all (from Politico.com):

    John Weaver, McCain’s former top strategist, said top Republicans have a responsibility to temper this behavior.

    “People need to understand, for moral reasons and the protection of our civil society, the differences with Sen. Obama are ideological, based on clear differences on policy and a lack of experience compared to Sen. McCain,” Weaver said. “And from a purely practical political vantage point, please find me a swing voter, an undecided independent, or a torn female voter that finds an angry mob mentality attractive.”

    “Sen. Obama is a classic liberal with an outdated economic agenda. We should take that agenda on in a robust manner. As a party we should not and must not stand by as the small amount of haters in our society question whether he is as American as the rest of us. Shame on them and shame on us if we allow this to take hold.”

    But, if it were up to them, such hard-edged tactics are clearly what many in the party base would like to use against Obama.

    So, on top of everything else we have to worry about, how long until we have to fear civil unrest because we might have a Democratic, liberal, black president?

    Nice, very nice.

  • Jordan Richardson

    This is like a bad game of Sim City.

  • http://www.futonreport.net/ Matthew T. Sussman

    Not true at all. Our splines are in no way reticulated.

  • Baronius

    Matt, I recognize that from SimCity, but I can’t place it. Please elaborate.

  • Zedd

    Dan,

    “he embraces a strict black identity, and all the victimhood he can glom onto, despite his privileged upbringing.”

    What is a Black identity? Do share.

    Dan Miller,

    “It would be absurd and un-American to vote against Senator Obama because he is Black.”

    Unfortunately, this would be a VERY AMERICAN thing to do. Let’s all step back and look at things as they really are.

    “for the simple reason that he is Black. That is, to my mind, no less disgraceful. ”

    Actually that is a constituancy issue. People vote for a person who they feel is most like them. Biden likes to talk about being from the working class. McCain likes to talk about his military record to vets. Palin is attracting dumb soccer moms. Obama will apeal to people who think he understands their condition.

    Also, may a recommend a study on what racism is. Racism is not prejudice (even if this matter is neither about prejudice nor racism)?

    Ruvy,

    You are suggesting because he was raised by Whites, people shouldn’t be afraid of him. Also most Whites have not had the experiences, education, cultural exposure that he has. If exposure is the litmus test for worthiness, can we then assume that Obama is better than most Whites? Just a thought.

  • Zedd

    Dave,

    Bless you.

    “who oppose Obama most strongly seem to oppose him primarily on an ideological basis. Those who oppose him on the basis of race seem more likely to agree with him ideologically, but are just uncomfortable with him for vague reasons which include race at least subconsciously.”

    Did it ever come to mind that if he were a Republican and there was no other person who was Rep to vote for that those sentiments would come out? Just wondering if you considered that little ditty.

  • Zedd

    Folks,

    Shock of a lifetime.

    You mean there are people out there who will not give a job to a person who they believe can do the job better, simply because he is Black? WOW. Now why haven’t those crazy radicals not mention that before? You’d think people would be frustrated or something about that.

    Welcome to our American kids. Now lets grow up.

    —-

    I love the idea of turning more Black because some guy that I don’t know got elected President. I guess I like being Black (whatever that means). I can’t wait to be more Black…. Abysmal stupidity. But it’s accepted because the lack of knowledge is about an irrelevant matter.

  • Clavos

    What is a Black identity? Do share.

    Just a WAG, but could it be that black experience which you’re forever telling us we whites can’t understand?

  • http://www.idiotwars.com Dave Nalle

    Did it ever come to mind that if he were a Republican and there was no other person who was Rep to vote for that those sentiments would come out? Just wondering if you considered that little ditty.

    Were that the case it would certainly need to be considered. My experience in Texas has convinced me that being black is a major political asset within the Republican party, but there’s no reason to think that’s a universal phenomenon. My observation is that most Republicans aren’t at all interested in issues of race one way or another, except to be almost pathetically enthusiastic when they encounter someone who is darked skinned and shares their beliefs.

    Dave

  • Dawn

    I think you are right Dave, most “real” Republicans wouldn’t disqualify a Republican candidate based on racial differences. But to me, the evangelical base isn’t what I consider real Republicans, but rather a separate group that have hijacked the RNC, much to the party’s detriment. McCain was a hopeful (if not somewhat liberal) candidate to bring the Republican party back around, but he went to the dark side by catering to that base of angry, hate-filled Christian right.

    The same group I like to call McCainiacs and are full of rage and anger, are really starting to frighten people. Seriously, McCain/Palin need to tell these nuts at their rallies to calm the “f” down.

    Kind of makes you wonder who associates with radicals doesn’t it?

  • Cindy D

    “I Don’t Mess With Black Men”

    Palin’s Racist Remark

  • Cindy D

    It would be hard to ask Palin to ask the crowd to calm down, she’s pretty busy whipping them into that hateful frenzy.

    The salon story Meet Sarah Palin’s radical right-wing pals (see page 2) She has a history of negative campaigning. Why else would she send out mailers billing herself as the “Christian” when running against a Lutheran named Stein, except to appeal to anti-Jewish sentiment by the suggestion he might be Jewish?

    McCain, is another story. I agree, I think this is something he’ll regret being a part of.

  • Clavos

    Cindy,

    I went to the site you linked in your comment #55.

    You’re spreading a completely unsubstantiated allegation which is coming from only one individual, with no witnesses to the alleged incident, and which allegedly took place a long time ago.

    I’m surprised (and disappointed) at you.

  • Jordan Richardson

    No different than the continued linking of Obama to Ayers and the inference that the two of them “pal around.”

  • Clavos

    Apart from the fact that my comment wasn’t addressed to you, Jordan, two wrongs don’t make a right.

  • Cindy D

    Clav,

    I have been waiting for that piece to come out since I learned of Royal’s scheduled press conference.

    I find no reason to doubt Royal. Palin has problems with both Native Americans and African Americans who reside in Alaska. And at this point I feel she should explain herself regarding his claim.

    In looking at Palin’s history she opposes Native American rights. She ignores the black community.

    I’ll say this much, I could have written that the comment was a claim. I guess I feel a bit disappointed in myself for just writing the title like that. I guess I felt justified because it was the title of the piece. In retrospect, I wish I had changed it.

  • Jordan Richardson

    Apart from the fact that my comment wasn’t addressed to you, Jordan, two wrongs don’t make a right.

    I’m sorry, sir. Next time I’ll know my place in the discussion.

    Not to pry, but do you consider the Ayers accusations “wrong?”

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    “My experience in Texas has convinced me that being black is a major political asset within the Republican party,”

    That would explain why the six African-American members (three currently), who have served in the House of Representatives from Texas have all been Democrats and the two current African Americans serving in the Texas State Senate are Democrat. I don’t have time to look through the assembly and we know there has never been put up a black governor. How exactly are you defining “major political asset?”

    From #57 it appears Clavos has never been to The Drudge Report or many online political sites. That’s stock and trade.

  • Clavos

    elbicho, regardless of how many outlets publish it, that one particular anecdote has only one source: an obscure musician who only recently surfaced with the “story,” which was my point that you apparently missed.

  • Clavos

    Mr. Richardson,

    Until real evidence is revealed, any allegations in reference to the relationship between BHO and Ayers that go beyond the facts of BHO and the bomber working together on the CAC and BHO later backpedaling fast to disavow the extent of his contact with a known terroristic and unrepentant bomber, yes. Those are established facts, anything else presented as facts is wrong, until real evidence is found.

    But not to worry, the Messiah will be elected, the little people need him.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    I didn’t miss it. That type of sourcing happens all the time on the Internet, which was my point that you apparently missed.

  • Clavos

    I didn’t miss it; I dismissed it.

  • Clavos

    I stand corrected and apologize, EB. I DID miss your point.

  • Zedd

    Clav,

    “Just a WAG, but could it be that black experience which you’re forever telling us we whites can’t understand?”

    He seems to understand it. Thought we’d all get his perspective.

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    Did you know there was gambling in Casablanca? ;)

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Clavos, how can we take you seriously when you make comments like “messiah” and the “little people need him”? I am open-minded, but come on, that kind of childish behavior doesn’t do much to convince anyone that the conservatives are open to other viewpoints.

  • Zedd

    Dave,

    “My observation is that most Republicans aren’t at all interested in issues of race one way or another, except to be almost pathetically enthusiastic when they encounter someone who is darked skinned and shares their beliefs.”

    Are you alright? Not being interested in issues of race is a little problematic. Since race matters. So the truth is they don’t care. Not such a good thing.

    Also, the over exuberance is a no no. It displays a lack of acceptance. Why would someones skin excite you? It’s not unlike people who moved into my neighborhood years after I did, telling me I’m welcome. The nerve!! Whites don’t own political thought. It’s not genetic. Why be overtly excited because someone with more melanin than you thinks similarly to you, if you don’t think about race.
    None of what you say can be proven because there aren’t that many Blacks who are active Republicans.

    Also, obviously Dems are not as racist and prejudice as you think. They have the most Black office holders AND they were the first to elect a Black as the nominee.

    I watched the Black Rep convention. It was a gathering of the most unfortunate Blacks in the looks department I had ever seen. Wow!! My brother even called me and said, “what is going on? Their all really ugly.” I’m guessing the teasing over the years made them seek out a different community to belong to…. Someone said it was carny hour. Dang, just unfortunate all around or to use the vernacular, “tow up”!!!

    Lastly, we don’t have DARKED skin. You have Whitened skin. According to evolution. It’s a freebie. Thought I’d help with that.

  • Clavos

    Clavos, how can we take you seriously when you make comments like “messiah” and the “little people need him”?

    I was merely repeating the title he has been given by one of his most prominent supporters, Dawn.

    The little people DO need him to lift them out of their misery; they are in fact, one of his largest constituencies, a substantial portion of his “base,” just as the fundies are a substantial part of McCain’s “base.”

    Lastly, I’m not advocating for anyone; I don’t really care what people (little or otherwise) think of conservatives (or liberals, for that matter).

  • Clavos

    BTW, Dawn, congratulations on your choice of Obama pic in the story; it makes him look positively angelic and the kind of guy who will take care of all of us when he becomes the president.

  • Clavos

    None of what you say can be proven because there aren’t that many Blacks who are active Republicans.

    Exactly Dave’s point, Zedd.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/diana_hartman diana hartman

    #30

    sooo, what was so interesting about it, and what do you make of it? for that matter, why did you post it?

  • http://www.glosslip.com Dawn

    Clavor, I liked that photo too. His smile seems genuine, which I think reflects his spirit. You don’t have to like the man, or his ideology or his political assertions, but he’s certainly a respectable person. For once, I’d like to have someone respectable running the United States. Is that too much to ask?

    Speaking of which, big kudos to McCain for trying to tone down the rhetoric at his rallies. Let’s hope Palin follows suit.

    Regardless of what happens on Nov. 4th, we are all in this situation together, a divided nation helps NO ONE.

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    Just a WAG, but could it be that black experience which you’re forever telling us we whites can’t understand?

    Got him on that one.

  • Heloise

    I found this on Huffpo. I copied it saved to my group:
    63 pages of so-called “Palin Vetting”

    How can they talk about Cindy and Sarah liking each other when they freakin didn’t know each other?

    Cindy, God love her, sounds like a woman who did synthetic drugs for decades. She can hardly hold her lips other than to look like she is not about to imbibe a drink to go with those pills. And am I detecting a pattern here among GOP women? I called Nancy “drug thin” from the first time I ever saw her. Because no one on earth can be that anorexic looking without drugs. I’ve never heard her confess to it. Betty Ford did and Cindy Lou McCain was forced to air her dirty drug habit.

    Heloise

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    The reason the Democrats have been pushing so hard for the youth vote is obvious: the youth vote is more open-minded and less prejudiced, and I mean that in the classic definition of the term.

    I think you’ve got it all wrong here. Democrats aren’t pushing for the youth vote. Take a look around.. who was sitting behind Obama at his rally in OH the other day? Middle aged white women.

    Democrats already have the youth vote. Also, as a percent, young people, esp 19-24, have very low vote turnout. There aren’t that many of them. There’s what a few million who vote each year in that age group? There are 10s of millions of middle aged white women.

    Young vote turnout jumped a full 10% for Kerry and he still lost. Even if Obama can pull out a miraculous 10% on top of Kerry’s 10% it doesn’t win him the election. Every year people say the young vote is going to increase; the election hinges on young people etc etc etc. It never does increase as much as expected and even when it does increase it’s not enough if you can’t win the big demographics that have turnout numbers over twice as high as young vote turnout will ever be.

  • Heloise

    Dave wrote: “I watched the Black Rep convention. It was a gathering of the most unfortunate Blacks in the looks department I had ever seen. Wow!! My brother even called me and said, “what is going on? Their (sic) all really ugly.”

    What a whipping blacks take from whites. You make everyone’s point here Dave, and your bro, exactly. What you’ve written is a racist cousin to my recent anecdote:

    I was talking to some teachers who claim to be unaware of what I call “if-you’re-black-you-must-be-related-to-the-only-other-black-person-I’ve-ever-met syndrome” as racist.

    The fact that he “sees” black as ugly is one of the oldest racist diatribes made quaintly famous by the French who were fond of even today putting black faces on coffee of women with huge red, red, big, big lips and just plain distorted-looking.

    The saddest part, from the token black voice here, is that whites wouldn’t know their racism if it hit them on their red necks.

    Heloise

  • http://www.indyboomer46.blogspot.com Baritone

    Despite McCain’s efforts to tone down the angry and misinformation rhetoric, the campaign has NOT backed off of it’s personal slams against Obama. Both the campaign and the party continue to run their hotly negative ads.

    I’m curious just what all you Obama haters think that Ayers and Obama did together? Do you think maybe they touched tinkles? Do you think that they built bombs on week-ends? Do you think they played catch with grenades? Or do you just think they plotted the violent overthrow of either the government or maybe Dolly World?

    It’s not clear that they ever talked about anything. They served on a couple of boards together. Apparently Ayers held a small fund raiser in his living room. Ayers gave a whopping $200 to Obama’s Senate campaign. Perhaps Ayers advised Obama about the best place to plant hostas in his yard.

    The ONLY reason this is an issue is that the McCainiacs (I like that, BTW) hope it will serve to create doubt in a few undecided minds – like that enlightened woman at the McCain rally who claimed that Obama is an Arab.

    It has been observed by a couple of reporters following the McCain campaign that more and more of those attending the rallies seem to be on the fringe, more ill-informed, hate spewing nutballs than in the past. Whose fault is that, I wonder?

    B

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    The Bradley effect is the only way McCain wins this election and he knows it. Every bit of polling data says Obama will win and history reinforces this conviction. Obama would have to shoot someone or declare himself a commie to lose this election. See my recent article on the subject.

    The McCain campaign isn’t stupid. They know this. They know they’ve lost and the Bradley effect is their only chance. Of course it’s broader than a strict black/white thing. They know they need to get moderate/leaning Obama voters to be scared. They need to make them afraid that Obama is fundamentally un-American. That he does not share their values. That he is different. That he is an ‘unknown.’ That he lacks experience.

    There attempts to do this can be listed as follows:
    -making race an issue again
    -McCain called Obama naive in both debates, he said Obama ‘just doesn’t understand’ 5 times in the first, he even called Obama’s plan dangerous
    -bringing up the Ayers/Wright associations again

  • Clavos

    Heloise @#80:

    Dave wrote: “I watched the Black Rep convention. It was a gathering of the most unfortunate Blacks in the looks department I had ever seen. Wow!! My brother even called me and said, “what is going on? Their (sic) all really ugly.”

    Dave didn’t say that, Zedd, a black woman, did (@#71).

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    Dave wrote: “I watched the Black Rep convention. It was a gathering of the most unfortunate Blacks in the looks department I had ever seen. Wow!! My brother even called me and said, “what is going on? Their (sic) all really ugly.”

    What a whipping blacks take from whites. You make everyone’s point here Dave, and your bro, exactly. What you’ve written is a racist cousin to my recent anecdote:

    I was talking to some teachers who claim to be unaware of what I call “if-you’re-black-you-must-be-related-to-the-only-other-black-person-I’ve-ever-met syndrome” as racist.

    The fact that he “sees” black as ugly is one of the oldest racist diatribes made quaintly famous by the French who were fond of even today putting black faces on coffee of women with huge red, red, big, big lips and just plain distorted-looking.

    The saddest part, from the token black voice here, is that whites wouldn’t know their racism if it hit them on their red necks.

    Heloise

    ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!?!?! This is hilarious.

    Dave didn’t say this. Zedd did. And judging from his comment ‘we don’t have darked skin’ he is black himself.

    So now black people are racist against blacks.

    Could we try to not be so PC here?

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    Dave didn’t say that, Zedd, a black woman, did (@#71).

    You caught it before me! Funny stuff.

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    There attempts to do this can be listed as follows:
    -making race an issue again
    -McCain called Obama naive in both debates, he said Obama ‘just doesn’t understand’ 5 times in the first, he even called Obama’s plan dangerous
    -bringing up the Ayers/Wright associations again

    Quite simply, the McCain campaign ran a clean campaign until it became apparent they couldn’t win with a clean campaign. The fact that they get dirty when it becomes obvious they are going to lose w/o a hail marry is obviously not a coincidence. In fact, I would venture that McCain himself knows this strategy is morally bankrupt. Props to them for avoiding it to this point.

  • Heloise

    Baritone that number of points is 5 to be exact in terms of the points ahead, according to Harris-Lacewell who spoke on Rachel Maddow’s show lat week indicated.

    Daily Kos is keeping due diligent care of the stats and numbers by polls and states that you could ever want. The happy news is that Obama has met and maxed the 5% he needs to score in order to neutralize the “Bradley Effect.”

    He is close to some say 12% ahead of McClone nationwide.

    They are scrambling to keep Bush states!!!

    My recent “Take Cover” article where I put the words “vote for the white guy” in McClone’s mouth, was picked up by New York Times topics page next to SNL pic.

    Heloise

  • Heloise

    Doesn’t matter. Why? Because the other research I cited in that same conversation is the one about the black children who chose white dolls over black dolls every time when the only diff was skin color. The oppressed minority ingest and digest what is foised upon them by the majority.

    It is not an original thought that “blacks are ugly” whether they are GOP or Dems or said by black or white.

    Heloise

  • http://www.maskedmoviesnobs.com El Bicho

    Heloise, you don’t get to keep commenting unless you admit your mistake in attributing Zedd’s comment to Dave and apologize.

    Although since you think you are JFK, maybe you think they are the same person as well

  • Heloise

    I was scanning the comments sorry. But my point is nonetheless TRUE. Yes, blacks are racist against blacks. If you need any proof of it just ask any dark-skinned black person from New Orleans. There is a wide chasm between the blacks who look white in NOLA and those who look black. Yes, they basically hate each other.

    That is the dirty laundry that Cosby and others talk about and folks don’t like.

    Heloise

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    It doesn’t matter. There’s a problem of over analyzing racism and political correctness in this country if a black person can’t call another black person ugly.

    Also, I don’t care if little black girls chose black dolls. As far as I’m concerned dolls are just meant to be white. It’s just tradition I guess. Maybe dolls just look better that way? Maybe whatever dolls the study chose, maybe whatever they were wearing, looked better with white ‘skin.’ Who knows. It’s not a big deal. How does a preference for white dolls tangibly effect anything of value in this world? What are we going to do.. force doll companies to fulfill a black doll sales quota?

  • pleasexcusetheinterruption

    Oh so Bill Crosby is racist too now?

    Geeze I need to turn my racist sensitivity meter up I guess.

  • Heloise

    Dawn like the old 1980s black play I quoted to McCain “Your arms too short to box with God.”

    Something bigger than McCain and Obama will sweep Obama, now it looks like landslide-place, into victory. And people will be “Dancing in the streets” something I saw in dream a long time ago over a monumental event.

    Rachel on Air America is talking about Harriet Meirs as amb to Pakistan? The base, and myself, were hating on her. She is sooooo liberal, dressed up like a conservative. Her nod got shot down and now she rears her ugly head up in Pakistan? Whoa.

    Heloise

    Heloise

  • Heloise

    El Bicho, what I say about JFK and me, I don’t think–I KNOW. That out of the way, I stand by my statement, however, I will apologize to Dave for attributing that quote to him.

    Heloise

  • Heloise

    poster of #91 and 92: don’t look now but you are officially a racist. Welcome to the club, been there done that.

    H

  • Marcia Neil

    The racism of skin color has been heavily covered in all kinds of socio-political contexts, but what about the racism of ‘blue eyes”? Often likening themselves to blue-green al/gae in the now-extensive annals of human affairs, does a majority population of blue-eyed people active within any given locale skew the odds towards major catastrophe, such as a Twin Towers shake-down, or towards the habit of organized crime?

  • Zedd

    Heloise,

    There are ugly people in all races. That particular group was especially hurt. Just an observation.

    As for seeing racism in every corner. That has to stop. it diminishes the focus on real racist activities that effect Blacks in a meaningful way. If Dave watched a show and thought the people in it were ugly, regardless of race, that would be his opinion. What you are asking is NOT to be treated as equal AND you will find yourself being thought of as a pariah. Everyone will dread Blacks if they cant treat them like everyone else. If someone who is Black is ugly, they are ugly (to that person). If a white person thinks all Blacks are ugly, so. I mean really. I happen to like the range of brown and deep deep chocolate skin. So.

    The New-Yorker “incident” was one of those ridiculous false indignations (or just stupidity) . The New Yorker was doing what it does to EVERYONE but because the people were Black, every numb headed loud mouth expressed hurt (eye roll). What they missed was that the New Yorker did Barrack a huge favor by making the notion of his being a potential link to Muslim extremists, ridiculous. The cover was funny. Most of us however sought another opportunity to complain over nothing. The bottom line is, if you want to play with the big boys (or join the rest of society) you’ve got to man up.

  • Condor

    “Albert Einstein helped in the creation of the atomic bomb, but I don’t think anyone considers him a terrorist.”

    Wha….????

    How? E=mc2? Come on. He put forth a theory, which was mathematically confirmed over a number of years. He didn’t invent the bomb, he expressed and indentified a natural occurance.

  • Condor

    “McCain, is another story. I agree, I think this something he’ll regret being a part of.” –
    #56 — October 10, 2008 @ 21:02PM — Cindy D

    How so Cindy D… everybody thinks McCain is going to croak 2 minutes after assuming the office. So if he does regret it, it won’t be for too long.

    On the question of Race and prejudice. We are all prejudice. Face it. History proves it, we see it now. In some way, shape, or form, everyone is. It’s human nature.

    Now… Who am I voting for. Well, who am I not voting for. Obama. Why? I don’t believe in co-presidents and I have this uneasy feeling after observation and reading that Michelle Obama is going to be a co-president. Hillary was a co-president and admitted it publically. I didn’t agree with it then, nor do I now. I don’t vote for co-presidents. I don’t even think it’s constitutional. In fact I wonder if you could be impeached for a practicing co-presidential spouse?

  • Arch Conservative

    “The reason the Democrats have been pushing so hard for the youth vote is obvious: the youth vote is more open-minded and less prejudiced, and I mean that in the classic definition of the term.”

    That’s a steaming pile of horseshit. The reason the “youth vote” is attracted to Obama is because they’re a generation of pussies that have been coddled their whole lives and an Obama presidency gives them the best chance to keep that gravy train a rollin once they leave college. They get to go from living off of mommy and daddy’s dime to living on the federal government’s if Obama has his way.

  • http://www.indyboomer46.blogspot.com Baritone

    Co-president? Twaddle! Republican God Incarnate Ronald Reagan couldn’t wipe his ass without consulting Nancy – and I mean before the onset of his Alzheimers.

    This is obviously gender bias. Guys simply can’t abide the notion that women can be smarter than they are. Michele Obama is one smart and very capable lady. It’s obvious that she can handle more than organizing the White House Easter egg hunt. However, her husband is strong on his own. There will be no co-presidency.

    Should he consult with her on certain issues? Of course. She is just as capable of having insights that could help in the decision making process as anyone else. Most of the people posting and commenting here at BC think they’re smarter than everybody in government and hardly shrink from offering up their considered opinions about pretty much everything. Should a well educated, intelligent and respected woman situated in close proximity to the president keep her perspectives to herself? I think not.

    B

  • http://drdreadful.blogspot.com Dr Dreadful

    Most of the people posting and commenting here at BC think they’re smarter than everybody in government and hardly shrink from offering up their considered opinions about pretty much everything.

    Quoted for truth…!

  • Clavos

    Here’s an interesting quote from an opinion piece by Mark Steyn in the Orange County Register:

    If the more frightening polls are correct, America is about to elect the most left-wing government in history: an Obama Oval Office, a Pelosi House of Representatives, a filibuster-proof Senate … and a year or two down the road maybe three new Supreme Court justices. It would be a transformational administration that would start building (in Michelle Obama’s words) “the world as it should be.”

    Of course, those in favor of a big government, politically correct nanny state will look at this probability as a positive, rather than negative, outlook.

    I don’t make more than $250K a year, but I’m willing to bet the last of my dwindling dollars that my taxes are going up, not down, once Obama and his cohorts are in control. I don’t believe for one second he can simultaneously enact all the ambitious plans he has for enriching the people AND lower taxes for all but the upper middle and upper classes.

    IMO, we are in for a season of class warfare very similar to that of Russia at the dawn of the Bolshevik revolution, and if I were rich, I’d take my money and leave. Now.

  • zingzing

    oh, clavos… are you saying that if obama wins, you’ll leave the country? how… democrat ’04 of you.

  • Clavos

    No, zing, I’m saying the rich should, to protect themselves.

  • Lisa Solod Warren

    Clav has already left the country….. and besides, he doesn’t give a damn, anyway.

    If the rich want to leave, let them. Some will, some won’t. Some of us less rich may well leave if McCain gets elected and we can manage it, some won’t.

    There are fewer rich than there were, at this point, due to Bush. If the rich were really smart, they would demand retribution and jail time for those that helped make them that way. I know I would appreciate a little punishment from the guys that just decimated my kids’ college funds. And here we go again for another tweaked bailout plan when the current one is barely two weeks old. All of it a lousy idea in the first place……

    BTW the NYT today discounts the Bradley effect having the same effect it did back then….but only time will tell.

  • Lisa Solod Warren

    Man, I MUST be exhausted….. I don’t want punishment FROM the assholes how decimated my kids’ funds, I want punishment FOR them:)

    Company all weekend and still recovering from surgery has clearly screwed with my head!

  • Clavos

    Clav has already left the country

    You’re right…I live in Miami – and love it, especially our international milieu; we have people, good food and arts from all over the world.

    There are fewer rich than there were, at this point, due to Bush.

    Actually not true. There are more than ever before, and a lot of them were middle class just a few years ago. There are also MANY more rich worldwide (not that Bush had anything to do with that), especially in the former Soviet countries (I’ve had Russian, Slovenian and Croatian clients over the past several months) and, of course, in the Middle East. China, too, has been growing millionaires like mushrooms these days. Globalizing the world’s economies is resulting in a LOT of new businesses worldwide, and enriching the entire globe.

    And BTW, there are Congressional records showing that Republicans were calling for tightening regulation of Fannie and Freddie as long ago as during the Clinton administration, but they were thwarted by Democrats, especially Barney Frank, in the name of making loans available for the poor to achieve home ownership. Sound familiar?

  • Cannonshop

    #107 Yeah, Lisa, but you support them Anyway, and you back the guy LEAST likely to punish them.

  • Lisa Solod Warren

    If the repubs wanted tightening, why did Bush call for more loans to those who could not pay? As late as 03? and why were the repubs so heavy on deregulation?

  • Clavos

    It wasn’t the Republicans who kept pushing the CRA to pressure Fannie and Freddie to accept risky loans from commercial banks. In fact, “heartless” Phil Gramm loudly argued against the CRA all during the 90s (that evil SOB).

    But the Democrats were not to be deterred; keeping the underclass on the dole and in thrall to them is their main strategy for getting votes and staying in office.

    Here’s a video of excerpts from C-Span broadcasts of Republicans calling for more regulation of the GSEs, while Democrat after Democrat insists they don’t need to be regulated.

  • zingzing

    “But the Democrats were not to be deterred; keeping the underclass on the dole and in thrall to them is their main strategy for getting votes and staying in office.”

    no matter how many times you say that, it still doesn’t make any sense. so a party keeps people poor to keep their votes? and you know about this? and yet, this strategy works? but, yet, as dave says, people don’t stay poor?

    which is it?

  • Clavos

    Doesn’t work?

    Does the underclass vote exclusively for Democrats?

    Are they the champions of the underclass?

    Does the underclass get any smaller year to year?

    Do very many of them get out and up?

    Is the dole enough for any of them to actually improve their lot?

  • zingzing

    the underclass doesn’t vote at all.

    does the underclass get any smaller? i dunno, ask dave.

    do they get up and out? tell it to dave.

  • http://drdreadful.blogspot.com Dr Dreadful

    …Republicans calling for more regulation of the GSEs, while Democrat after Democrat insists they don’t need to be regulated.

    Oh, the irony.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/dan_miller Dan(Miller)

    Baritone,

    In comment #101 you say, Republican God Incarnate Ronald Reagan couldn’t wipe his ass without consulting Nancy – and I mean before the onset of his Alzheimers. I assume that you inadvertently omitted a link supporting that statement. Assuming that there is some factual support, I would be interested to know whether former President Reagan interrupted Mrs. Reagan’s seances with her astrologer to consult on this. It is very important for me to know the truth. And, if you know and can provide a basis for it, whom did former President Clinton consult before cleansing himself, fore and aft?

    These are crucial topics for discussion, and should be fully ventilated. We need all of the salient facts before voting.

    Dan(Miller)

  • Lisa Solod Warren

    Clav, I sat and listened to Bush push for Fannie and Freddie to give loans to low income people who could not afford them, in 2003… telling those people to buy nice houses, houses like the middle class had, and they could do it without any money.

    With a Republican president and a Republican congress, he could have done what he wished, had he wished it. And he did.

    And don’t forget Gramm’s dereg bill pushed through in 2000 while the supreme court was deciding the election.

    You choose your facts…. and ignore others.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writer/dan_miller Dan(Miller)

    Baritone, just a post script to my comment #116 above. On another thread, in comment # 11, you state, There are and will always be nut cases on all sides who write and say pretty nasty shit about candidates they oppose.

    Thanks for elevating the level of the discussion. It certainly needs it; even meaningful scatalogical comments are an improvement.

    Dan(Miller)

  • Clavos

    the underclass doesn’t vote at all.

    Oh please, zing.

  • http://drdreadful.blogspot.com Dr Dreadful

    There’s no point in begging, Clav. He won’t vote if he doesn’t want to.

    ;-)

  • Cali

    no, I don’t believe that. Even if some old people were still racist from way back then. They won’t be here after 50 years or so.
    Racism is dead.
    Barrack Obama is going to win this election. Everyone i’ve talked to says they want change, and he is going to bring it, America needs it.
    By the way, I am not black, nor white. I am not personally attacking any one, just telling the truth.