Today on Blogcritics
Home » Culture and Society » Spirituality » Players, Prayer, And Football Coaches

Players, Prayer, And Football Coaches

Please Share...Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone
No doubt some will see this as simply a continuation of “The Vast Atheist Wing Conspiracy” and lament ad nauseam about the declining state of America thanks to the same such militant atheists. It was however the right call. There was nothing about this decision and the reasons for it that attacked any religions. When the coach is being paid by the school, a government agency, they are a representative of the government, whether they like it or not it is fact. As such a representative, by initiating prayer, especially over the protests of players and parents, they are issuing a governmental order establishing a religion.
Powered by

About TheCO

  • http://www.djradiohead.com DJRadiohead

    I understand technically that a state high school football coach can be considered an agent of the government, but forgive my denseness that is not how I view them.

    People participating in a prayer in one’s presence just doesn’t seem oppressive or unreasonable to me. My job requires me to undertake hours of training to learn to tolerate (and am even encouraged to welcome and celebrate) other people’s differences but if I pray in their presence (and a high school football coach is in the room) I am violating the Constitution?

    I am sure I am oversimplifying some things. I just think fairness should require all of us stretch for one another. Scrapping the prayer altogether doesn’t seem to me to do that.

  • http://sussfr.blogspot.com Matthew T. Sussman

    Prayer made a few kids uncomfortable, so they did away with prayer.

    I’m sure some of the kids were also uncomfortable with getting HIT TO THE GROUND BY A FRIGGIN’ 300 POUND LINEMAN.

    It’s football.

    At some point kids have to learn to deal with life and to coexist with things they do not understand and do not agree with. You’d think getting pushed around by large mammals in hard plastic helmets would teach kids how to handle hard situations.

  • http://iwt.blogspot.com TheCO

    Um, nope. The football coach is in a position of government sponcered authority over those kids. He has the ability to remove any child he likes. He maybe an ethical person and not do it over religious reasons, but he still has the ability to do so. That is what the anti-establishment clasue is about.

    DJR said:

    People participating in a prayer in one’s presence just doesn’t seem oppressive or unreasonable to me. My job requires me to undertake hours of training to learn to tolerate (and am even encouraged to welcome and celebrate) other people’s differences but if I pray in their presence (and a high school football coach is in the room) I am violating the Constitution?

  • http://iwt.blogspot.com TheCO

    Try again. Football is the reason those kids are there. They are not there to be indoctrinated into someone elses faith. They are not there to be ostricized for not sharing the faith of someone else and being too honest to fake it.

    Matthew let the following inanity escape his keyboard:

    I’m sure some of the kids were also uncomfortable with getting HIT TO THE GROUND BY A FRIGGIN’ 300 POUND LINEMAN.

  • http://www.djradiohead.com DJRadiohead

    Then the issue, it seems to me, is the retribution after the fact moreso than the prayer. If a coach punishes non-participants then he is using an established religion to officiate his team. If he prays with the players who want to pray but continues to coach the way he has always coached… what’s the problem?

  • http://sussfr.blogspot.com Matthew T. Sussman

    Theco, you’re using the following words:

    -ostracize
    -indoctrinate

    The kids used the word:
    -uncomfortable

    Now these are high school kids. They have vocab quizzes every week. They’re capable of using those first two words in context, but they didn’t. Do you have some proof that these kids who were uncomfortable with the prayer were ostracized for resisting some kind of indoctrination?

    To say that a high school coach praying before games with the team is an example of the government establishing a religion is hyperbole at best.

  • http://www.djradiohead.com DJRadiohead

    Witnessing a prayer is hardly indoctrination or force-feeding someone’s faith. I had to sit through music appreciation classes where a teacher played opera for an entire hour. Guess what? I still hate opera. But I kept my mouth shut, listened politely and went on about my business.

    The Constitution guarantees we don’t all have to have the same religion. It doesn’t guarantee we won’t ever have to witness someone participating in theirs.

    It doesn’t guarantee we will never have to be in the presence of thoughts or speech with which we do not agree.

  • MCH

    Remember the prayer in the Dallas locker room before the game with Chicago in the movie “NORTH DALLAS 40″?

    Anybody remember what John Matusek yelled out after the “Amen.” ??

    :o)

  • http://iwt.blogspot.com TheCO

    No Matthew,

    The writer of the article used the word uncomfortable, we don’t know what words the players or their parents used, there’s not a single player quoted. Don’t put words in my mouth.

    Matthew T. Sussman on October 13, 2005 07:30 PM:

    Theco, you’re using the following words:

    -ostracize
    -indoctrinate

    The kids used the word:
    -uncomfortable

    Now these are high school kids. They have vocab quizzes every week. They’re capable of using those first two words in context, but they didn’t. Do you have some proof that these kids who were uncomfortable with the prayer were ostracized for resisting some kind of indoctrination?

  • http://iwt.blogspot.com TheCO

    DJ,

    As noted in the article there were no portions of this enforcement by the school that prohibited _player_ initiated prayer. Simply that the coach who _is_ a government official could not lead it.

  • http://sussfr.blogspot.com Matthew T. Sussman

    You put words in their mouth first by using heavy words like “ostracize” and “indoctrinate.”

    I’m going by all the evidence I have to me, which is the story you linked.

    I thought perhaps you knew something I didn’t.

  • http://iwt.blogspot.com TheCO

    Matt,

    What i said was a reasonable extrapolation based on the in general biased against the decision tone of the article. The kids are probably better off without a coach who takes his responsabilities so lightly anyway. If he were pissed off and responsible he should have waited until the end of the season to leave, instead he took the cowards way out and stomped off in a huff a six year old would be ashamed to be caught in.

  • parent coach

    I do not see the harm in praying before a game perhaps that’s a superstition he carries out. I know that all athlete have a superstition and it varies from culture to religion.