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Party Game Review: Slangology

Word games are among the most popular type of party games. Players might build words from letters, match nouns and modifiers, or draw images or give hints to other players trying to guess the words. Slangology from Playroom Entertainment takes word games in a whole new direction by having players make up their own hilarious definitions to wacky terms from "scatatious" to "raisin ranch." Players take turns each round acting as the “Slangmeister,” who draws a card from the deck and reads a slang word. These words come from regional dialects, different time periods, jargon in specialized fields, sports and…

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Word games are among the most popular type of party games. Players might build words from letters, match nouns and modifiers, or draw images or give hints to other players trying to guess the words. Slangology from Playroom Entertainment takes word games in a whole new direction by having players make up their own hilarious definitions to wacky terms from “scatatious” to “raisin ranch.”

largeTuckdie(112112)Players take turns each round acting as the “Slangmeister,” who draws a card from the deck and reads a slang word. These words come from regional dialects, different time periods, jargon in specialized fields, sports and games, and the little-used Latinates of a hefty dictionary, giving something for everyone.

Word aficionados might want to follow up on certain words to find their origins, but Slangology is all about the definitions. When the Slangmeister has read the word, each player writes down his or her own definition for the word, be it “YMMV” (your mileage may vary) or “hanabuttas” (snot).

At its core, Slangology is a bluffing game. The Slangmeister collects the definitions and reads them aloud, including the accurate definition. All of the other players then vote on which definition they believe is right using facedown tokens that may read +2, +3, or -1. Players will watch one another, reading their moves to see who plays where to see who is avoiding their own definitions, which they know to be wrong. Having them read aloud removes any possibility of recognizing handwriting, and the minus chips are a great way to misdirect someone who is too watchful and follows up on votes. When all of the tokens are placed, the real definition is revealed, and players gain scores based on who they duped into voting for their own fake definitions.

slangology2Rather than a point-goal, Slangology’s endgame is something of a time-marker by giving each person several turns as the Slangmeister. Since the game is highly randomized based on the wide range of words, from “manky” (smelly) to “click clack” (an automatic weapon), players’ scores will be all over the place until they learn how to best catch the eye of their opponents. Most of all, players will have a good laugh thinking up their own crazy takes on funny-sounding words. Optional rules have the Slangmeister read the definitions with players making up slang words to match.

Slangology is a party game for three to eight players aged 10 and up, perfect for word-lovers. While much of any language’s slang is considered vulgar, the cards are kept clean, making it suitable for adults and younger players alike. The slang ranges from interesting new vocabulary to hilarious nicknames. People might come away from Slangology with a few words to add to their everyday lives. Even if everything’s gone pear-shaped, no wuckas, everything’ll be cook and curry, even cavi, before yonks.

About Jeff Provine

Jeff Provine is a Composition professor, novelist, cartoonist, and traveler of three continents. His latest book is a collection of local ghost legends, Campus Ghosts of Norman, Oklahoma.
  • Jon Sobel

    This is just yet another variation on the old game of “Dictionary” I used to play when I was a kid – where all you needed was a dictionary and paper and pencils. I guess thinking up your own definitions for obscure words never gets old!