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Party Game Review: Siege Pong

Siege Pong takes the skills and entertainment value of the college-brewed party game Beer Pong and builds upon it a whole new level of strategy. Everyone has their own home rules for bouncing ping pong balls into cups, but Siege Pong warns, “Your homes have been burned, and only the siege remains.” This is a game about tactics and maximizing destruction. To begin a game of Siege Pong, teams build castles by stacking cups mouth-up as “Towers” around bottom-up “Terrain” cups. Building upward creates a more valuable, and arguably more aesthetically pleasing, structure, but flimsy construction or being overly dependent…

Review Overview

88/100

User Rating: 3.4 ( 4 votes)
88
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Siege Pong takes the skills and entertainment value of the college-brewed party game Beer Pong and builds upon it a whole new level of strategy. Everyone has their own home rules for bouncing ping pong balls into cups, but Siege Pong warns, “Your homes have been burned, and only the siege remains.” This is a game about tactics and maximizing destruction.

To begin a game of Siege Pong, teams build castles by stacking cups mouth-up as “Towers” around bottom-up “Terrain” cups. Building upward creates a more valuable, and arguably more aesthetically pleasing, structure, but flimsy construction or being overly dependent on a foundational cup may lead to destruction as the balls begin to fly. As in other forms of the game, Siege Pong is at its core teams taking turns to throw projectiles, sinking a shot into their opponents’ cup to eliminate it. What sets Siege Pong above the others is its Deck of Fate.

Each player begins with a hand of fate cards and draws a fresh card each turn. The varied cards change up the game. Cupgrades allow players to upgrade the value of their towers, gain extra throws through ballistae, and put up defensive planks. Other cards give bonuses to throws to expand the destruction or interrupt play, like the favorite “Assassin!” card that allows a player to throw a ball directly at an opponent in hopes of making him or her lose a turn. Players may also take advantage of Classes such as “The Barbarian,” which allows particularly aggressive players to treat knocked-over cups as sunk, and “The Strategist,” which allows players to choose which cup is removed when a ball is sunk.

The strong medieval theme perhaps best comes through with the Knight cards. These are played on the table, gradually marching their way across the field of battle until they come into contact with an enemy cup or card. Then, as with kamikazes, both the knight and the enemy piece are removed from play.

While wielding cards is an integral part of Siege Pong, there is yet another level of resource-management that makes it unique in the realm of ball-and-cup games. Cards also feature values in coin, which may be cashed in instead of playing the card’s typical action. Players may use the coins to rebuild their castle or cause free destruction, paying to remove an opponent’s stubborn tower, terrain, or card.

With its Deck of Fate, Siege Pong is a much more sophisticated game than its predecessor. Players will need to be mindful of strategies besides skillfully sinking ping pong balls. They must look for every advantage and watch out for advancing knights or special powers raised by their opponents.

Siege Pong is a party game for two or four players. While older players might enjoy a little imbibing as they play, drinking is not a necessary part of Siege Pong, which makes it a suitable, active party game for younger players who have mastered hand-eye coordination and strategizing. As game lengths will depend upon players’ coordination and the sturdiness of the tower build, they will typically run less than an hour, depending on which scenario players choose to follow: Total Destruction, which involves bringing the castles down completely, Heroic Build with its points system, or Spoils of Attrition, which uses the Deck of Fate as a timer ticking down to a sudden end, with the player whose castle remains grandest the laudable winner.

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About Jeff Provine

Jeff Provine is a Composition professor, novelist, cartoonist, and traveler of three continents. His latest book is a collection of local ghost legends, Campus Ghosts of Norman, Oklahoma.