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Obama Administration moving forward with Open Skies Treaty

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The Obama administration has launched an interagency study on how to improve the Open Skies Treaty. There are currently 34 countries, including the U.S., who have joined the treaty.

Each member country can fly inspection missions over the others using unarmed "peace planes." The planes are equipped with photographic equipment to take pictures of military establishments. The idea is to improve military openness and cooperation.

Representatives from all 34 countries met in Vienna last week to discuss treaty issues, such as switching from older photographic equipment to digital sensors. The U.S. is hosting a workshop for treaty members on digital sensor options this summer in Dayton, Ohio.

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivered a video greeting to the conference last week. Rose Gottemoeller, U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Verification, said at the conference's closing, "The United States believes that it is essential for the Open Skies Treaty to remain a vital instrument in our Euro-Atlantic conventional arms control toolbox."  She added, "We will encourage new thinking about applying Open Skies toward emerging challenges and threats…"

Many regions outside of the current Open Skies Treaty could benefit from this cooperative initiative. Consider the military situation in Asia with the fast-rising power of China, and the rival nuclear weapons states of India and Pakistan. An open skies arrangement could be explored with these countries.

Then there are North Korea and South Korea, who need to have more cooperation between their militaries.  Another region is the Middle East. Could Open Skies also have an impact on arms control there?

There is much to explore with Open Skies, both in terms of strengthening the existing treaty and potential creations of similar agreements around the globe.

While the treaty is going to undergo some cost-saving technological adjustments to its aircraft, one aspect of the treaty is unchanging—its dedication to openness and cooperation.

In her Open Skies speech, Gottemoeller noted Vice President Biden's statement on European security which reads, "we need to work together to broaden our commitments to reciprocal transparency about all our military forces, including both conventional and nuclear forces, and other defense assets in Europe, including missile defenses.”

The transparency Biden speaks of is something deep-rooted in American foreign policy. Harold Stassen, who was President Eisenhower's disarmament advisor when the Open Skies concept was first proposed in 1955, once wrote, "The important tools of diplomacy are not the new developments in technology which always change, nothing remaining the same. The key elements are approaches and attitudes…"

For this reason, expect Open Skies to continue to be a significant force in international relations for years to come.

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About William Lambers

William Lambers is the author of several books including Ending World Hunger: School Lunches for Kids Around the World. This book features over 50 interviews with officials from the UN World Food Programme and other charities discussing school feeding programs that fight child hunger. He is also the author of Nuclear Weapons, The Road to Peace: From the Disarming of the Great Lakes to the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, Open Skies for Peace, The Spirit of the Marshall Plan: Taking Action Against World Hunger, School Lunches for Kids Around the World, The Roadmap to End Global Hunger, From War to Peace and the Battle of Britain. He is also a writer for the History News Service. His articles have been published by newspapers including the Cincinnati Enquirer, Des Moines Register, the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Buffalo News, San Diego Union Tribune, the Providence Journal, Free Lance-Star (VA), the Bakersfield Californian, the Washington Post, Miami Herald (FL), Chicago Sun-Times, the Patriot Ledger (MA), Charleston Sunday Gazette Mail (WV), the Cincinnati Post, Salt Lake Tribune (UT), North Adams Transcript (MA), Wichita Eagle (KS), Monterey Herald (CA), Athens Banner-Herald (GA) and the Duluth News Journal. His articles also appear on History News Network (HNN) and Think Africa Press. Mr. Lambers is a graduate of the College of Mount St. Joseph in Ohio with degrees in Liberal Arts (BA) and Organizational Leadership (MS). He is also a member of the Feeding America Blogger Council.
  • http://www.republicofdave.com Dave Nalle

    Pointless posturing. The countries you would want to have join such a treaty will never do so, and so long as they don’t, the whole thing is just meaningless and a waste of time. Like so much we get out of Washington these days it’s hollow symbolism which does no good for anyone.

    Dave

  • wakeuppeople

    hey, but this way they can expand their worldwide, illegal drug cartel. oh, and spray everybody.