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Nintendo 3DS Review: ‘Mario Golf World Tour’

Mushroom Kingdom golf courses choose to disregard proper shot rationale. Instead of aiming for the pithy hole on a rolling green, challenges dictate you must collect coins by sailing the ball through patches of the golden currency. That's not golf. It's “sort of like golf but not really.” Mario Golf has three fantasy (if sport authentic) courses. The rest? They're DLC or the dopey nine cup character circuits. A dynamic aesthetic split moves from the greenery of a cut out forest, the seaside blues of a beach, and dreary rock outcroppings of a mountainous desert. Those create traditional layouts. Nintendo…

Review Overview

three out of five stars

Reviewer's Rating

Summary : “It's a me, Mario!” he says, just before he slips on a sandwich board touting additional content.

User Rating: 4.7 ( 2 votes)
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Mushroom Kingdom golf courses choose to disregard proper shot rationale. Instead of aiming for the pithy hole on a rolling green, challenges dictate you must collect coins by sailing the ball through patches of the golden currency. That’s not golf. It’s “sort of like golf but not really.”

Mario Golf has three fantasy (if sport authentic) courses. The rest? They’re DLC or the dopey nine cup character circuits. A dynamic aesthetic split moves from the greenery of a cut out forest, the seaside blues of a beach, and dreary rock outcroppings of a mountainous desert. Those create traditional layouts.

Nintendo then pries themselves away from tradition. As Microsoft and Sony began distributing piecemeal chunks of their software onto digital marketplaces, Nintendo persevered for the consumer. And now they haven’t. Mario Golf’s cartridge is pathetically slender in content, introducing the Kingdom’s prestigious Castle Club with aimless conversation. There is nothing to do and Shy Guys wandering in a circle are of no value. Hallways are fancy with their décor and usually meaningless in their purpose.

Championship course runs are lonely and solitary, available practice rounds more so. Softened tutorials are chunky mini-games of minimal consequence, and bounding between skill tests may allow the content unlock to drip another purchasable item. One item. Getting two would be a considered the equivalent of a Christmas bonus.

There is an astute calming effect at work inside of Mario Golf. Background rhythms slyly represent head bobbing Koji Kondo themes and pre-swing pointers do the complex shot computations for users. Mild adjustments and slow rolling greens bring the difficult sport into the niceties of Nintendo’s comfort zone.

This is built around competent messaging as Mario and company celebrate your victorious stances, and soften failures by speech bubbling positive vibes. “Keep trying!” bloats a confident Mario. Perseverance is valuable. Life lessons are learned, and more are available in a season pass for $14.99. It’s as if Nintendo is hawking self-improvement materials through shady ads run during daytime television.

Nintendo expects their load bearing online service to keep Mario Golf floating on stacks of 3DS card piles, or at least in the folder dubbed “important” within digital libraries. Worldwide tournaments poke at potential competitors to dive in for another round. Those who stick it out and attend designated trophy ceremony times are likely to splurge on added content. That’s business. Developer Camelot’s prior portable offerings, which presented surface level storytelling and loose RPG number leveling, at least grounded a satisfying bunch of tourneys. This Mario Golf feels perplexed as it shoves five quirky, obstacle dumped, character-specific golfing trails with friendly (and adequate) real world-based holiday itineraries.

Thus, Mario Golf feels distractingly venomous. Inside of its code lies the workings of proficient sport, merely lacking the endowment needed to justify itself. It’s wacky and it’s not, with no one seemingly able to decipher whether Mario Golf should be fitted with course coin boxes. Indecision corrupts the over arching style base, and menus deep DLC spills choice which erodes the initial purchase.

“It’s a me, Mario!” he says, just before he slips on a sandwich board touting additional content for a game you may have dismissed by the time such digital materials become usable.

 

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About Matt Paprocki

Matt Paprocki has critiqued home media and video games for 13 years and is the reviews editor for Pulp365.com. His current passion project is the technically minded DoBlu.com. You can read Matt's body of work via his personal WordPress blog, and follow him on Twitter @Matt_Paprocki.
  • Johnathan Tuppence

    Any conclusions that could possibly be gleaned from this are impossible to find thanks to the two paragraphs’ worth of writing you’ve got here here stretched out to be as verbose and obtuse as possible. “Indecision corrupts the over arching style base, and menus deep DLC spills choice which erodes the initial purchase”? Did you even read what you were typing?

    As for the actual meat of your review, it’d be interesting to hear exactly why you find the majority of the game’s courses to be of little worth, but I can see you’re too busy cracking open your thesaurus and seeing how many different ways you can say “me not like DLC, Nintendo bad” to be bothered with anything else.

    • http://www.doblu.com/ Matt Paprocki

      It’s authentic frontier gibberish.