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Music Review: Yes – Union

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During the late 1980’s and early 1990’s there were two different Yes bands. There was the official group of Chris Squire, Trevor Rabon, Tony Kaye, and Alan White. Then there was the unofficial group of Jon Anderson, Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, and Alan White. Both found themselves in the studio at the same time and Squire and Anderson decided to combine the projects into one release. The resulting album was titled Union.

The music was complex and interesting yet inconsistent. The two Yes bands were very different in sound and style, and while they might have united for the album’s creation, their various contributions made for a disjointed affair. In the final analysis, though when taken separately the tracks are very good. The critical reaction was mixed but the album was nevertheless a commercial success, receiving a gold record award for sales in the United States. The resulting tour was both a huge critical and commercial success.

The first two tracks are in the vein of the pop/rock Yes of 90125. “I Would Have Waited Forever” and “Shock To The System” are both polished rock. “Without Hope, You Cannot Start The Day” was the fifth track and follows much in the same style. They probably should have combined it with the first two tracks, actually, rather than separating them.

“Masquerade” was a late addition to the album as the record company wanted a Steve Howe instrumental. It may have been short at just over two minutes, but he quickly proved why he is considered one of the better guitarists of his era. This acoustic track was nominated for a Grammy for Best Rock Instrumental Performance.

Right in the middle of the album are two back-to-back tracks that are fine examples of creative, experimental progressive rock. “The More We Live – Let Go” and “Angkor Wat” have all the makings of classic Yes with guitar and keyboards combining to lay down the foundation for Jon Anderson’s vocals. “Angkor Wat” incorporated the Cambodian poetry of Pauline Cheng.

The album’s best known track spent six weeks in the Number One position on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks Chart. “Lift Me Up” treads the line between progressive and mainstream rock and was perfect radio fare during the early 1990’s.

The original album ended with “Take The Water To The Mountain.” It begins as a sparse track and gradually builds as instruments are added. The only problem is its length; at just over three minutes, it sounds kind of rushed.

Union is a unique if inconsistent album. The union of Yes would be short-lived as Bill Bruford, Rick Wakeman, and Steve Howe would quickly depart, returning the band to their 1983-1988 configuration. Yet it remains an interesting stop in the career of Yes.

About David Bowling

  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/hazy-dave/ Hazy Dave

    (Replace the second instance of “Alan White” in the first paragraph with “Steve Howe”.)